A Windows XP help forum. PCbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PCbanter forum » Microsoft Windows 7 » Windows 7 Forum
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Acer 5250-BZ853



 
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #16  
Old April 18th 12, 04:59 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
pjp[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 304
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

In article ,
lid says...

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 12:15:55 -0300, pjp
wrote:

Sorry the top post but want to insure you

1st - vacuum it out insuring the heat sinks are cleared



You should *never* use a vacuum cleaner inside a computer. If you do
so, you run the risk of a static electricity discharge frying the
motherboard.

Instead, blow out the dust with a can of compressed air.


A use the "plastic tube thingie" add-on comes with every vacumn cleaner
and I put on it's output nozzle (rather than suck) and if she's really
dusty take it outside cause it'll make a mess

I often wonder if I over-rev the fan(s) sometimes but I've never had one
fail after doing so. I also uplug it from AC.
Ads
  #17  
Old April 18th 12, 03:41 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,913
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 15:47:43 -0500, Char Jackson
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 13:19:28 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:


My view is to avoid risk whenever you can. But we are obviously
different in this regard.


There are different levels of risk.



Certainly true. And I recommend avoiding all levels that you can
readily avoid.


An air compressor is fine, but very few of us have one. So for all
practical purposes, canned air is what's best.


That would be fine if canned air worked, but in my view it doesn't. It
only dislodges a tiny fraction of what needs to be removed.



That's not my experience at all. Does it remove everything? No,
nothing will remove everything. But it removes the great majority of
what's there.

  #18  
Old April 18th 12, 03:44 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,913
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 21:47:14 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

In message , Char Jackson
writes:
On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 08:46:17 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 12:15:55 -0300, pjp
wrote:

Sorry the top post but want to insure you

1st - vacuum it out insuring the heat sinks are cleared


You should *never* use a vacuum cleaner inside a computer. If you do
so, you run the risk of a static electricity discharge frying the
motherboard.


I agree in theory, but in practice I'm not nearly so strict. I've used
a vacuum cleaner well over a thousand times over the years and never


I think I have seen vacs specially designed for use with computers.
Expensive (overly so, I think), but presumably static-dissipative. I'm
talking about mains (US: line) powered ones, not the USB-powered mini
ones that are really just for cleaning the keyboard.



Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?


  #19  
Old April 18th 12, 04:50 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,572
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:41:36 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 15:47:43 -0500, Char Jackson
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 13:19:28 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:


My view is to avoid risk whenever you can. But we are obviously
different in this regard.


There are different levels of risk.



Certainly true. And I recommend avoiding all levels that you can
readily avoid.


That's ridiculous, considering the amount of risk we're talking about
here, which is about as close to zero as you can get. There's risk
with canned air, as well. Do you avoid that, too? Probably not.

An air compressor is fine, but very few of us have one. So for all
practical purposes, canned air is what's best.


That would be fine if canned air worked, but in my view it doesn't. It
only dislodges a tiny fraction of what needs to be removed.



That's not my experience at all. Does it remove everything? No,
nothing will remove everything. But it removes the great majority of
what's there.


If that's your experience, you'd probably be shocked at what it
DOESN'T remove. The loose dust bunnies are easily removed, but they
aren't the problem.

I routinely see systems where the CPU heat sink fins are packed
tightly with a combo of dust, cat hair, and who knows what else. That
stuff laughs at me when I reach for canned air. When it comes out,
it's in small chunks, almost cement-like.

--

Char Jackson
  #20  
Old April 19th 12, 07:09 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Andy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 224
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

My solution for packed hair ect is a small air nozzle on my air compressor.
done properly it does no damage and gets rid of the build up.


--
AL'S COMPUTERS
"Char Jackson" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:41:36 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 15:47:43 -0500, Char Jackson
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 13:19:28 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:


My view is to avoid risk whenever you can. But we are obviously
different in this regard.

There are different levels of risk.



Certainly true. And I recommend avoiding all levels that you can
readily avoid.


That's ridiculous, considering the amount of risk we're talking about
here, which is about as close to zero as you can get. There's risk
with canned air, as well. Do you avoid that, too? Probably not.

An air compressor is fine, but very few of us have one. So for all
practical purposes, canned air is what's best.

That would be fine if canned air worked, but in my view it doesn't. It
only dislodges a tiny fraction of what needs to be removed.



That's not my experience at all. Does it remove everything? No,
nothing will remove everything. But it removes the great majority of
what's there.


If that's your experience, you'd probably be shocked at what it
DOESN'T remove. The loose dust bunnies are easily removed, but they
aren't the problem.

I routinely see systems where the CPU heat sink fins are packed
tightly with a combo of dust, cat hair, and who knows what else. That
stuff laughs at me when I reach for canned air. When it comes out,
it's in small chunks, almost cement-like.

--

Char Jackson



  #21  
Old April 19th 12, 07:12 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Allen Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 451
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:44:59 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 21:47:14 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

In message , Char Jackson
writes:
On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 08:46:17 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 12:15:55 -0300, pjp
wrote:

Sorry the top post but want to insure you

1st - vacuum it out insuring the heat sinks are cleared


You should *never* use a vacuum cleaner inside a computer. If you do
so, you run the risk of a static electricity discharge frying the
motherboard.

I agree in theory, but in practice I'm not nearly so strict. I've used
a vacuum cleaner well over a thousand times over the years and never


I think I have seen vacs specially designed for use with computers.
Expensive (overly so, I think), but presumably static-dissipative. I'm
talking about mains (US: line) powered ones, not the USB-powered mini
ones that are really just for cleaning the keyboard.



Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?

Try typing computer vacuum cleaners into Google. There are plenty and
plenty of reviews. The number things that can be most effective are
preventative. SHCS is the number one cause of congestive computer
buildup. Second hand cigarette smoke will cause that dust to stick.
Keep the air in the room as dust free by adding cheap solutions.

http://www.americanallergysupply.com...ir-cleaner.htm

I use several of these that I made myself. Fan,filter,tape. I have
four running at all times in my computer room and can say they work
better then any commercial filter on the market.


  #22  
Old April 19th 12, 07:19 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Allen Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 451
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 02:09:53 -0400, "Andy" wrote:

My solution for packed hair ect is a small air nozzle on my air compressor.
done properly it does no damage and gets rid of the build up.


What size and make is your compressor. I was thinking of attaching
connections to an air ball to use a nozzle. I'd have to cut off that
tire inflating end first obviously.
  #23  
Old April 19th 12, 04:37 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,913
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 02:12:47 -0400, Allen Drake
wrote:

On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:44:59 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?

Try typing computer vacuum cleaners into Google. There are plenty and
plenty of reviews.



Thanks. I googled it yesterday, and found lots of ads and some
reviews. But what I had hoped to find and didn't find was an article
by an *expert*, not necessarily about any particular computer vacuum
cleaner, but discussing the effectiveness and risk (or lack or risk)
of using any such machine.


The number things that can be most effective are
preventative. SHCS is the number one cause of congestive computer
buildup. Second hand cigarette smoke will cause that dust to stick.



Fortunately there's no cigarette smoke in our house, second hand or
not. I stopped smoking 44 years ago, and we don't permit any guests to
smoke here.

  #24  
Old April 19th 12, 08:50 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Allen Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 451
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 08:37:17 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Thu, 19 Apr 2012 02:12:47 -0400, Allen Drake
wrote:

On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:44:59 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?

Try typing computer vacuum cleaners into Google. There are plenty and
plenty of reviews.



Thanks. I googled it yesterday, and found lots of ads and some
reviews. But what I had hoped to find and didn't find was an article
by an *expert*, not necessarily about any particular computer vacuum
cleaner, but discussing the effectiveness and risk (or lack or risk)
of using any such machine.


I don't think it's all that complicated so I wouldn't hold my breath
looking for an "Expert". You could make your own and become an expert
yourself I love inventing little gadgets and such. You could mount
small plastic tubes at several points throughout your system and
connect a vacuum pump.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5nT9oc1Oi5I


The number things that can be most effective are
preventative. SHCS is the number one cause of congestive computer
buildup. Second hand cigarette smoke will cause that dust to stick.



Fortunately there's no cigarette smoke in our house, second hand or
not. I stopped smoking 44 years ago, and we don't permit any guests to
smoke here.


Same here. I don't quite remember just how many years it was for me
but I can say I never smoked in my adult life and I will be 65 in
July.
  #25  
Old April 19th 12, 10:43 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,633
Default Acer 5250-BZ853 (now ESD-safe vacuum cleaners)

In message , Ken Blake
writes:
[]
Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?


No, but I've had a quick look: the prices are even more eye-watering
than I remembered:
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/work-area/7199879/

That has some .pdf files which might say something useful (I haven't
looked).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G.5AL-IS-P--Ch++(p)Ar@T0H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A closed mouth gathers no foot.
  #26  
Old April 21st 12, 07:26 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
charlie[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 707
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On 4/19/2012 2:12 AM, Allen Drake wrote:
On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:44:59 -0700, Ken
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 21:47:14 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

In , Char Jackson
writes:
On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 08:46:17 -0700, Ken
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 12:15:55 -0300,
wrote:

Sorry the top post but want to insure you

1st - vacuum it out insuring the heat sinks are cleared


You should *never* use a vacuum cleaner inside a computer. If you do
so, you run the risk of a static electricity discharge frying the
motherboard.

I agree in theory, but in practice I'm not nearly so strict. I've used
a vacuum cleaner well over a thousand times over the years and never

I think I have seen vacs specially designed for use with computers.
Expensive (overly so, I think), but presumably static-dissipative. I'm
talking about mains (US: line) powered ones, not the USB-powered mini
ones that are really just for cleaning the keyboard.



Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?

Try typing computer vacuum cleaners into Google. There are plenty and
plenty of reviews. The number things that can be most effective are
preventative. SHCS is the number one cause of congestive computer
buildup. Second hand cigarette smoke will cause that dust to stick.
Keep the air in the room as dust free by adding cheap solutions.

http://www.americanallergysupply.com...ir-cleaner.htm

I use several of these that I made myself. Fan,filter,tape. I have
four running at all times in my computer room and can say they work
better then any commercial filter on the market.



Vacuum cleaners are made for computer and other cleaning of even powered
up electronic equipment. The chief differences are carbon or another
semi conductive material added to the plastic, and spark suppression
capacitors on the brushes, as well as anti static bags.

Long ago, I got into a big hassle over this type of specialty vacuum
cleaners.
It had to do with (of all things) the paper bags. Seems that the GSA
rotated suppliers and wanted to substitute vacuum cleaners that were the
household type. When we finally got it through their heads that the
vacuum cleaners were special purpose, naturally the contract would be
expired, the order cancelled, and we'd have to start the process all
over again. We had something like ten thousand bags in inventory for the
original vacuum cleaners. (Antistatic bags, to boot!)

Finally, we had a stack of paper about a foot high documenting our
efforts, and a GSA exec wandered by on a tour, asking about problems.
Shortly after we showed the tour group the stack of paper, a dozen of
the correct vacuum cleaners showed up, current contract or not. We
didn't even get a bill!.

So yes, small shoulder carry vacuum cleaners suitable for computer use
are made. The price those days was almost twice that of a similar model
without the anti static and noise suppression options. About $100
instead of $59.95
  #27  
Old April 21st 12, 03:03 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Allen Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 451
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 02:26:45 -0400, charlie wrote:

On 4/19/2012 2:12 AM, Allen Drake wrote:
On Wed, 18 Apr 2012 07:44:59 -0700, Ken
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 21:47:14 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

In , Char Jackson
writes:
On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 08:46:17 -0700, Ken
wrote:

On Tue, 17 Apr 2012 12:15:55 -0300,
wrote:

Sorry the top post but want to insure you

1st - vacuum it out insuring the heat sinks are cleared


You should *never* use a vacuum cleaner inside a computer. If you do
so, you run the risk of a static electricity discharge frying the
motherboard.

I agree in theory, but in practice I'm not nearly so strict. I've used
a vacuum cleaner well over a thousand times over the years and never

I think I have seen vacs specially designed for use with computers.
Expensive (overly so, I think), but presumably static-dissipative. I'm
talking about mains (US: line) powered ones, not the USB-powered mini
ones that are really just for cleaning the keyboard.


Yes, I've seen those too. How effective they are at eliminating
static, I don't know. But if you, or anyone else, could point me to a
web site that discusses their effectiveness, I'd like to read more
about it.

If they are effective, and not *too* expensive, I would consider
buying one. Do you remember what prices you saw?

Try typing computer vacuum cleaners into Google. There are plenty and
plenty of reviews. The number things that can be most effective are
preventative. SHCS is the number one cause of congestive computer
buildup. Second hand cigarette smoke will cause that dust to stick.
Keep the air in the room as dust free by adding cheap solutions.

http://www.americanallergysupply.com...ir-cleaner.htm

I use several of these that I made myself. Fan,filter,tape. I have
four running at all times in my computer room and can say they work
better then any commercial filter on the market.



Vacuum cleaners are made for computer and other cleaning of even powered
up electronic equipment. The chief differences are carbon or another
semi conductive material added to the plastic, and spark suppression
capacitors on the brushes, as well as anti static bags.

It's those damn motors that run wide open all the time and generate
static and noise that I hate. The computer is nothing but a vacuum
cleaner with hardware stuffed inside.

I don't own a household vacuum cleaner that uses bags.Right or wrong
for some reason I figured the new bagless ones were better.


Long ago, I got into a big hassle over this type of specialty vacuum
cleaners.
It had to do with (of all things) the paper bags. Seems that the GSA
rotated suppliers and wanted to substitute vacuum cleaners that were the
household type. When we finally got it through their heads that the
vacuum cleaners were special purpose, naturally the contract would be
expired, the order cancelled, and we'd have to start the process all
over again. We had something like ten thousand bags in inventory for the
original vacuum cleaners. (Antistatic bags, to boot!)


SIOW you got stuck holding the bag You got reamed


Finally, we had a stack of paper about a foot high documenting our
efforts, and a GSA exec wandered by on a tour, asking about problems.
Shortly after we showed the tour group the stack of paper, a dozen of
the correct vacuum cleaners showed up, current contract or not. We
didn't even get a bill!.


Not a bad ending-Good.

So yes, small shoulder carry vacuum cleaners suitable for computer use
are made. The price those days was almost twice that of a similar model
without the anti static and noise suppression options. About $100
instead of $59.95


Probably not enough competition. There are countless numbers of HH
VCs on the market.
  #28  
Old April 21st 12, 04:03 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,913
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 10:03:14 -0400, Allen Drake
wrote:


I don't own a household vacuum cleaner that uses bags.Right or wrong
for some reason I figured the new bagless ones were better.




I've often seen ads for vacuum cleaners in which the seller proudly
states that they are bagless. I've never understood that pride. To me,
it seems that not having a bag that you can throw away with the
collected dirt means that emptying the vacuum cleaner is far dirtier
and more troublesome.

What am I missing?

  #29  
Old April 21st 12, 04:11 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_53_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 147
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On 4/21/2012 5:03 PM, Ken Blake wrote:
On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 10:03:14 -0400, Allen
wrote:


I don't own a household vacuum cleaner that uses bags.Right or wrong
for some reason I figured the new bagless ones were better.




I've often seen ads for vacuum cleaners in which the seller proudly
states that they are bagless. I've never understood that pride. To me,
it seems that not having a bag that you can throw away with the
collected dirt means that emptying the vacuum cleaner is far dirtier
and more troublesome.

What am I missing?


Having to buy bags, what else?

--
Alias
  #30  
Old April 21st 12, 06:34 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Allen Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 451
Default Acer 5250-BZ853

On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 08:03:37 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Sat, 21 Apr 2012 10:03:14 -0400, Allen Drake
wrote:


I don't own a household vacuum cleaner that uses bags.Right or wrong
for some reason I figured the new bagless ones were better.




I've often seen ads for vacuum cleaners in which the seller proudly
states that they are bagless. I've never understood that pride. To me,
it seems that not having a bag that you can throw away with the
collected dirt means that emptying the vacuum cleaner is far dirtier
and more troublesome.

What am I missing?


I have an old "Green Machine" that is also a rug cleaner. It has been
working fine for what seems to be over 10 years. It has no bag and has
a large container that looks like it would hold more then any bag.
From what I remember the bag cleaners don't suck as much as the bag
gets full. It is a bit of a pain to empty but I do it out on my back
deck every few months or so. I've been waiting for it to die so I can
look into a newer model that might work better. You might be right
about the old style being more convenient.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2014 PCbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.