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Putting a WD2500JB IDE on my XP PC



 
 
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  #16  
Old January 21st 14, 11:10 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Paul
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Posts: 18,281
Default Putting a WD2500JB IDE on my XP PC

BillW50 wrote:
On 1/21/2014 3:46 PM, Paul wrote:
BillW50 wrote:
On 1/20/2014 7:22 PM, Paul wrote:
Modern drives, have S.M.A.R.T . And the drive has a thermistor
located somewhere in the unit, to measure the drive temperature.
You no longer have to "feel" the drive to detect overheating,
as you can read out the drive temperature via SMART. If you're
reading 60C, that would spell serious trouble. My drives
right now are at 31C (below body temperature).

Did you ever see that Google study they did about hard drives? They
found higher drive temperature drives tend to be more reliable than
cooler running drives. This is the opposite belief of most experts.
And do you have a lot of experience with portable computers like
laptops and tablets?

This tablet for example, the drive isn't doing much so far and it is
running at 116F (47C) already. That is a bit lower than what my
portable machines run at. As running at 124F (51C) is usually more
the norm. And I often have temps running like 135F (57C) during
defrag or cloning the drive. And I have dozens of these devices and
they all run at these temperatures. Nor am I suffering any problems
with any hard drive failures either.


But the Google study is invalid. No humidity measurements.

http://i43.tinypic.com/156eash.gif


Hmm... so you believe that humidity affects the reliability of hard
drives? I haven't actually pondered this theory before. So how do you
believe that humidity effects hard drive reliability?


Hard drives have a breather hole, which equalizes atmospheric pressure
on either side of the HDA. The drive is constantly "breathing" in and out.

I have no idea how the materials inside the drive could be affected.
Neither do I have a plain English explanation anywhere, as to
what that graph is meant to imply.

The Google study is done, without much in the way of control or
measurement of humidity. Making the study amusing, but useless.

Paul
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  #17  
Old January 22nd 14, 01:36 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
BillW50
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,556
Default Putting a WD2500JB IDE on my XP PC

On 1/21/2014 5:10 PM, Paul wrote:
BillW50 wrote:
On 1/21/2014 3:46 PM, Paul wrote:
BillW50 wrote:
On 1/20/2014 7:22 PM, Paul wrote:
Modern drives, have S.M.A.R.T . And the drive has a thermistor
located somewhere in the unit, to measure the drive temperature.
You no longer have to "feel" the drive to detect overheating,
as you can read out the drive temperature via SMART. If you're
reading 60C, that would spell serious trouble. My drives
right now are at 31C (below body temperature).

Did you ever see that Google study they did about hard drives? They
found higher drive temperature drives tend to be more reliable than
cooler running drives. This is the opposite belief of most experts.
And do you have a lot of experience with portable computers like
laptops and tablets?

This tablet for example, the drive isn't doing much so far and it is
running at 116F (47C) already. That is a bit lower than what my
portable machines run at. As running at 124F (51C) is usually more
the norm. And I often have temps running like 135F (57C) during
defrag or cloning the drive. And I have dozens of these devices and
they all run at these temperatures. Nor am I suffering any problems
with any hard drive failures either.

But the Google study is invalid. No humidity measurements.

http://i43.tinypic.com/156eash.gif


Hmm... so you believe that humidity affects the reliability of hard
drives? I haven't actually pondered this theory before. So how do you
believe that humidity effects hard drive reliability?


Hard drives have a breather hole, which equalizes atmospheric pressure
on either side of the HDA. The drive is constantly "breathing" in and out.


Yes, but only if the atmosphere charges in regards to the internal
pressure of the hard drive. Let's say no pressure difference takes place
and only humidity change takes place, could that transfer between the
breather hole? In my experience with ultra high vacuum systems, yes it
could. This is a super huge extreme in regards to atmosphere pressures.
But in regards to atmosphere pressures, it would take many hours to have
any effect at all. And probably weeks till they are both equal.

I have no idea how the materials inside the drive could be affected.
Neither do I have a plain English explanation anywhere, as to
what that graph is meant to imply.


English isn't your native language? Or are you saying it is?

The Google study is done, without much in the way of control or
measurement of humidity. Making the study amusing, but useless.


I dunno, I have been in the middle of manufacturing of components
including ICs and all, electronic design, etc. And while I had nothing
to do with hard drive engineering or manufacturing, it isn't all that
different than tape drives, electronic components, etc. And I can't
think of anything that is inside of a hard drive that would change the
reliability in regards with humidity (I am totally almost ignorant when
it comes to chemistry - so maybe this is the missing piece). But if you
can think of anything, I am very interested in hearing about the theory.

--
Bill
Motion Computing LE1700 Tablet ('09 era) - Thunderbird v12
Centrino Core2 Duo L7400 1.5GHz - 2GB RAM - Windows 8 Professional
 




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