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hiding extensions by default



 
 
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  #16  
Old November 27th 17, 04:10 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,808
Default hiding extensions by default

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:34:26 -0600, wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:24:23 -0600, Char Jackson
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 19:11:47 -0600,
wrote:

I always thought that hiding extensions was stupid too. But I do wish MS
would allow hiding by filename. Those goddamn "System Volume
Information" files annoy the f**k out of me and appear on every
partition, every flash drive, and where ever else MS can shove them. I
DO NOT use that drive wasting crap anyhow, and have it disabled
everywhere.


Windows uses SVI, so if you use Windows you're probably (indirectly)
using SVI.

But I still got to see that clutter on everything.....
Since it's disabled, I'd think they would either not create them, or at
least give us a way to hide them. Hiding the Recycle Bin would be useful
too. Again, I dont use it. When I delete something, I want it GONE....


By default, the SVI folders are not visible, so you've chosen to see
them.


I know I can disable ALL system files, but I do want to see most of them
when I am inside the Windows folder. But I dont want to see these SVI
files almost everywhere. If you know of a way to hide them, please tell
me how.

The SVI folders are all empty.


How are you verifying that? Windows Explorer isn't going to help, but
you can use a few other methods. I use Treesize Free to explore in
there, but Linux should also work. Be careful, though, some folks report
that their PC will no longer boot after mucking around in there.

Anyway, even if you disable System Restore, I've never seen an empty SVI
Folder. There's always at least a couple of things in there.

Thats because I disabled SVI.


I'm not sure what that means. What steps did you take?

But if I
right click on a SVI and choose properties, they are empty.


Right, Windows Explorer is trained to hide the SVI contents.

--

Char Jackson
Ads
  #17  
Old November 27th 17, 06:19 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
No_Name
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default hiding extensions by default

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:10:10 -0600, Char Jackson
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:34:26 -0600, wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:24:23 -0600, Char Jackson
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 19:11:47 -0600,
wrote:

I always thought that hiding extensions was stupid too. But I do wish MS
would allow hiding by filename. Those goddamn "System Volume
Information" files annoy the f**k out of me and appear on every
partition, every flash drive, and where ever else MS can shove them. I
DO NOT use that drive wasting crap anyhow, and have it disabled
everywhere.

Windows uses SVI, so if you use Windows you're probably (indirectly)
using SVI.

But I still got to see that clutter on everything.....
Since it's disabled, I'd think they would either not create them, or at
least give us a way to hide them. Hiding the Recycle Bin would be useful
too. Again, I dont use it. When I delete something, I want it GONE....

By default, the SVI folders are not visible, so you've chosen to see
them.


I know I can disable ALL system files, but I do want to see most of them
when I am inside the Windows folder. But I dont want to see these SVI
files almost everywhere. If you know of a way to hide them, please tell
me how.

The SVI folders are all empty.


How are you verifying that? Windows Explorer isn't going to help, but
you can use a few other methods. I use Treesize Free to explore in
there, but Linux should also work. Be careful, though, some folks report
that their PC will no longer boot after mucking around in there.

Anyway, even if you disable System Restore, I've never seen an empty SVI
Folder. There's always at least a couple of things in there.

Thats because I disabled SVI.


I'm not sure what that means. What steps did you take?

But if I
right click on a SVI and choose properties, they are empty.


Right, Windows Explorer is trained to hide the SVI contents.


Maybe there is somethimg inside of them. My win98 comp will delete them
from flash drives. I can do a USB boot to linux on one of my XP machines
(not on my laptop though, since that dont support booting from USB). I
can and have removed all the SVI files from a linux boot, but they just
come right back when I boot to XP again.

I dont remember how I disabled SVI. I do all that tweaking one thing at
a time and the next time I do a new install of XP I cant remember how I
did stuff. Not long ago, I started a text file with notes to do stuff
like that. I may cut some text from this newsgroup, or some website, or
just type in what to do, to fix some XP annoyance. I should have started
doing that years ago, but I didn't. All I know there is a way inside the
controls to shut off SVI. Or maybe I used Tweak-UI.... or some other
tweaking software for XP....

What I do know,s is that a new install of XP needs a lot of tweaking and
modifying to get rid of the annoyances and to make it run the way I
like. XP loves to collect garbage, like SVI crap, info about what I
click on, not to mention all the crap in the Recycle bin and browser
cache. Tweak-UI helps, but dont do it all. In Win98, I made a batchfile
to clear away all the garbage in one step, but thats not so easy in XP..
I suppose it gets worse in every newer version of Windows. It's no
wonder that some people reinstall their OS yearly. For every gb of
useful data, Microsoft adds 5gb of crap, that most people dont know how
to remove.



  #18  
Old November 27th 17, 04:38 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
David E. Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 888
Default hiding extensions by default

On 11/26/2017 7:02 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 15:05:01 -0800, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

On 11/26/2017 9:39 AM, Ralph Fox wrote:
On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 08:02:23 -0800, David E. Ross wrote:

Has anyone been able to change that default in Windows 7 so that Rename
includes the extension when hightlighting the file name? More often
than not, that is what I want because I often want to copy the complete
file name for use in text, in a search, or other such purpose without
actually changing the name.


To copy the complete file name, include the "press Ctrl+A" below.

Right-click Rename press Ctrl+A press Ctrl+C


No. While in Rename, Ctrl-A has no effect.


Strange. For me, it works as expected in 7, 8.1, and 10.


Aha! It works for files in folders but not for files on my desktop.

--
David E. Ross
http://www.rossde.com/

Am I the only one who noticed the following?
* President Trump issued executive orders
that increase health-care costs.
* The Republicans in Congress propose to
eliminate itemized deductions for
health-care costs.
  #19  
Old November 28th 17, 09:51 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,808
Default hiding extensions by default

On Mon, 27 Nov 2017 07:38:29 -0800, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

On 11/26/2017 7:02 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 15:05:01 -0800, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

On 11/26/2017 9:39 AM, Ralph Fox wrote:
On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 08:02:23 -0800, David E. Ross wrote:

Has anyone been able to change that default in Windows 7 so that Rename
includes the extension when hightlighting the file name? More often
than not, that is what I want because I often want to copy the complete
file name for use in text, in a search, or other such purpose without
actually changing the name.


To copy the complete file name, include the "press Ctrl+A" below.

Right-click Rename press Ctrl+A press Ctrl+C

No. While in Rename, Ctrl-A has no effect.


Strange. For me, it works as expected in 7, 8.1, and 10.


Aha! It works for files in folders but not for files on my desktop.


I had to put a file on my otherwise clean desktop to see for myself, but
you're right, on Win 7 anyway. I didn't try the others but I assume they
all work the same. Good catch.

--

Char Jackson
  #22  
Old November 28th 17, 07:54 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
No_Name
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default hiding extensions by default

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 13:42:55 -0600, Wildman wrote:

I was being respectful toward frequent contributor "Paul", who has
related his experience that just looking around caused one of his
systems to be unbootable into Windows, unless I'm misunderstanding what
he said. But yes, at least in my case, just looking around has never
caused me any issues.


I mean no disrespect either but, I sand by what I
said. "Mucking around" does not occur as long as
the file system remains read-only. Period.


"Read Only" means nothing for a folder. Something got screwed up on my
Win98 machine, so anything I downloaded was going to a some stupid
folder that was buried inside of "doicuments and settings". The files
were supposed to go to D:\DOWNLOAD. I reset this on my browser and
somehow it kept sending the files to that stupis folder. I deleted that
unwanted folder, but it would be recreated again. So, I made that folder
a READ ONLY folder, thinking I couold not write to it, so my browser
would ask me where to put the download file. WRONG. Read Only means
nothing on a folder. The downloads still went there.

I finally fixed it by reinstalling the browser.

  #23  
Old November 28th 17, 08:01 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
No_Name
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default hiding extensions by default

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:39:31 -0600, Char Jackson
wrote:

I was being respectful toward frequent contributor "Paul", who has
related his experience that just looking around caused one of his
systems to be unbootable into Windows, unless I'm misunderstanding what
he said. But yes, at least in my case, just looking around has never
caused me any issues.

-


I have a small Hex Editor that will read anything. As long as I ONLY
READ it, nothing gets screwed up. Most of the time binary files are not
readable anyhow, but the header will contain some regular text, showing
me that the file is a .jpg image or a .exe file, etc...

I often use that to open something in my browser cache. Those cache
files have no extensions, and maybe I want to save an image that a
website wont allow downloading. Using the hex editor, I can see if a
file is an image type. If it is, I can rename it with the extension and
view it. The file sizes usually tell me if the cache item is htm (text)
or more likely an image or sound file, etc...

  #24  
Old November 28th 17, 08:01 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,356
Default hiding extensions by default

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:39:31 -0600, Char Jackson
wrote:


On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 11:35:18 -0600, Wildman wrote:


On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:10:10 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:


On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:34:26 -0600, wrote:

The SVI folders are all empty.

How are you verifying that? Windows Explorer isn't going to help, but
you can use a few other methods. I use Treesize Free to explore in
there, but Linux should also work. Be careful, though, some folks report
that their PC will no longer boot after mucking around in there.


There is no danger in "reading" a file system no matter
what method or OS you are using. The mucking around
you mentioned would only occur if the user done something
that caused the file system to be written to.


I was being respectful toward frequent contributor "Paul", who has
related his experience that just looking around caused one of his
systems to be unbootable into Windows, unless I'm misunderstanding what
he said. But yes, at least in my case, just looking around has never
caused me any issues.



I was just "looking around" in my garage the other day. I was looking
for something and didn't look where I was going, so I tripped and fell
on the floor.

Fortunately, I didn't break anything, but I did have (and still have)
some issues--bruises and pain. vbg

  #25  
Old November 28th 17, 08:42 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Wildman[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 409
Default hiding extensions by default

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:39:31 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 11:35:18 -0600, Wildman wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:10:10 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:34:26 -0600, wrote:

The SVI folders are all empty.

How are you verifying that? Windows Explorer isn't going to help, but
you can use a few other methods. I use Treesize Free to explore in
there, but Linux should also work. Be careful, though, some folks report
that their PC will no longer boot after mucking around in there.


There is no danger in "reading" a file system no matter
what method or OS you are using. The mucking around
you mentioned would only occur if the user done something
that caused the file system to be written to.


I was being respectful toward frequent contributor "Paul", who has
related his experience that just looking around caused one of his
systems to be unbootable into Windows, unless I'm misunderstanding what
he said. But yes, at least in my case, just looking around has never
caused me any issues.


I mean no disrespect either but, I sand by what I
said. "Mucking around" does not occur as long as
the file system remains read-only. Period.

--
Wildman GNU/Linux user #557453
The cow died so I don't need your bull!
  #26  
Old November 28th 17, 09:25 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,479
Default hiding extensions by default

Wildman wrote:
On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:39:31 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 11:35:18 -0600, Wildman wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 21:10:10 -0600, Char Jackson wrote:

On Sun, 26 Nov 2017 20:34:26 -0600, wrote:

The SVI folders are all empty.
How are you verifying that? Windows Explorer isn't going to help, but
you can use a few other methods. I use Treesize Free to explore in
there, but Linux should also work. Be careful, though, some folks report
that their PC will no longer boot after mucking around in there.
There is no danger in "reading" a file system no matter
what method or OS you are using. The mucking around
you mentioned would only occur if the user done something
that caused the file system to be written to.

I was being respectful toward frequent contributor "Paul", who has
related his experience that just looking around caused one of his
systems to be unbootable into Windows, unless I'm misunderstanding what
he said. But yes, at least in my case, just looking around has never
caused me any issues.


I mean no disrespect either but, I sand by what I
said. "Mucking around" does not occur as long as
the file system remains read-only. Period.


Well, it surprised the hell out of me.

I was using the "sum" command on the large files
I found in System Volume Information. All of the
large files have a sum of "00000". I thought that
was pretty neat. These could well have been some
representation of a shadow copy.

Well, after I summed those files in SVI (which is *read*
not write), I could no longer boot Windows 7. The
automatic repair tried three times to repair it,
the third pass being a block by block CHKDSK
scan (takes an hour). And nada. Could not recover.
Since I had a backup that coincidentally had
been made only two hours before, I just restored,
rather than make a lifetime research project of it.
I wasn't planning on trashing the OS that day,
and got really lucky on having a backup.

So while I still feel perfectly safe using Linux
for both read and write on NTFS, the experience
did shake my confidence just a tiny bit. And
I feel there is some property of those files
that isn't "normal". The checksum of exactly
zero on each (1GB or so) file, was pretty
weird. What was it reading ? Dunno.

I wouldn't think of writing to those files.
I know better than that. Reading them would change
the "Last Accessed" time, that's assuming Linux
even enables that. On Windows, you can disable
Last Accessed tracking if you want, without side effects
(I think people do that for SSD drive usage).

Paul
  #27  
Old November 28th 17, 11:39 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
No_Name
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 139
Default hiding extensions by default

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 23:01:12 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

If you open mystery files in IrfanView, then - at least if it's one of
the common image formats, I'm not sure if it now does it for other types
- if it is a type it recognises, it will popup something like "xxx is a
.jpg file with incorrect extension. Rename?" (Even if you say no [in
which case it doesn't rename!], it still _displays_ them.)


Hmmmmmm, I never knew that was possible. I'll have to try it. Seems
easier than using the Hex Editor. With the Hex Editor, I still dont know
which .jpg I found, till I open it. Much of the time they are something
useless like a facebook icon or advertisment.

I have always used Acdsee for image viewing, but I have installed and
occasionally used Infranview.

  #28  
Old November 29th 17, 12:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 943
Default hiding extensions by default

In message ,
writes:
[]
I have a small Hex Editor that will read anything. As long as I ONLY
READ it, nothing gets screwed up. Most of the time binary files are not
readable anyhow, but the header will contain some regular text, showing
me that the file is a .jpg image or a .exe file, etc...

I often use that to open something in my browser cache. Those cache
files have no extensions, and maybe I want to save an image that a
website wont allow downloading. Using the hex editor, I can see if a
file is an image type. If it is, I can rename it with the extension and
view it. The file sizes usually tell me if the cache item is htm (text)
or more likely an image or sound file, etc...

If you open mystery files in IrfanView, then - at least if it's one of
the common image formats, I'm not sure if it now does it for other types
- if it is a type it recognises, it will popup something like "xxx is a
..jpg file with incorrect extension. Rename?" (Even if you say no [in
which case it doesn't rename!], it still _displays_ them.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Someone once said that scientists and prostitutes get paid for doing what they
enjoy. - Prof Stepehen Hawking in RT 2013/12/7-13
  #29  
Old November 29th 17, 05:30 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,808
Default hiding extensions by default

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:01:31 -0700, Ken Blake
wrote:

On Tue, 28 Nov 2017 12:39:31 -0600, Char Jackson
wrote:

But yes, at least in my case, just looking around has never
caused me any issues.



I was just "looking around" in my garage the other day. I was looking
for something and didn't look where I was going, so I tripped and fell
on the floor.

Fortunately, I didn't break anything, but I did have (and still have)
some issues--bruises and pain. vbg


LOL Keeping it real.

--

Char Jackson
 




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