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Excellent article about Linux



 
 
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  #31  
Old December 29th 18, 07:56 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Roger Blake[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, mechanic wrote:
Then the machine with upgraded Win10 will be logged in the
appropriate MSFT server and reactivation is automatic at any
reinstall of the Win10. This argument was all sorted out about five
versions ago (of Win10).


It did not work in this case. Microsoft support was also unable
to get it to work.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)

NSA sedition and treason -- http://www.DeathToNSAthugs.com
Don't talk to cops! -- http://www.DontTalkToCops.com
Badges don't grant extra rights -- http://www.CopBlock.org
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  #32  
Old December 29th 18, 08:06 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Peter Kozlov[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, Roger Blake wrote:
On 2018-12-29, Peter Kozlov wrote:
IoT is here.


Not in my house it isn't. IoT is a terrible, terrible idea. Hordes
of cheap, poorly-designed internet-connected devices most of which
will never see security updates. What could possibly go wrong?

And without needing a host like Windows as the middleman
we're all better off. The cloud is the host and the device is now the
node. The devices are getting a lot smarter now.


All this "cloud" nonsense is just marketspeak for using someone else's
hardware as a server. A return to the server and terminal computing of
the 1970s.


If you have an Android phone and you take photos, those photos upload to
Google and your storage on the local device is not hampered by the
storage limitations of you local device.

Google's excellent AI is the result of cloud computing analysis which is
far greater than the mobile device itself.

When someone sends you mail, the cloud routes it all and places it in
your inbox. The next time your device polls for new email, you then
retrieve it.

On my iPhone, I have access to 50 million songs. I don't have to store
them all. I just have access to them all. I use YouTube Music. When I
like a song others are suggested and in general it's good at picking
songs I will like. That's a benefit of could computing.

When I request an Uber, the cloud calculates all the drivers near me and
the destination I have. It then finds me a driver suitable for my
destination. And this is international. That's the cloud. It's not just
the server client model of yesterday. We have cloud based file systems
and work units that span many machines into clusters. Cloud is much more
advanced technology.

Now small devices, the IoT, have lightweight operating systems of their
own. Devices that used to require a PC as sync point are going away if
not already gone. Now the device itself is capable of syncing with the
cloud. My iPhone is a good example of this. It has a direct relationship
with YouTube Music. The videos I like are downloaded directly from the
iPhone from YouTube. I no longer need a client, like a Mac or Windows. I
can be a Linux user and still enjoy the benefits of the iPhone or
Android as a separate issue.

You can call this market speak if you like. I say you're wrong about
that, but I don't see that at matters at all anyway. It's a benefit
offered to everyone. If you're excited about this opportunity and wish
to downplay it, that's your choice. I like "cloud" computing.

--
Peter Kozlov
  #33  
Old December 29th 18, 08:45 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

IoT is here.


Not in my house it isn't. IoT is a terrible, terrible idea. Hordes
of cheap, poorly-designed internet-connected devices most of which
will never see security updates. What could possibly go wrong?


not all iot devices are cheap crap. many of them get regular automatic
updates.

win10 also has automatic security updates, except there are those who
criticize that, some of whom actively disable it.

And without needing a host like Windows as the middleman
we're all better off. The cloud is the host and the device is now the
node. The devices are getting a lot smarter now.


All this "cloud" nonsense is just marketspeak for using someone else's
hardware as a server.


or your own hardware, and it's not nonsense. there's a lot of
functionality that is not possible any other way.

A return to the server and terminal computing of
the 1970s.


not really.
  #34  
Old December 29th 18, 08:45 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Peter Kozlov
wrote:

IoT is here.


Not in my house it isn't. IoT is a terrible, terrible idea. Hordes
of cheap, poorly-designed internet-connected devices most of which
will never see security updates. What could possibly go wrong?

And without needing a host like Windows as the middleman
we're all better off. The cloud is the host and the device is now the
node. The devices are getting a lot smarter now.


All this "cloud" nonsense is just marketspeak for using someone else's
hardware as a server. A return to the server and terminal computing of
the 1970s.


If you have an Android phone and you take photos, those photos upload to
Google and your storage on the local device is not hampered by the
storage limitations of you local device.

Google's excellent AI is the result of cloud computing analysis which is
far greater than the mobile device itself.

When someone sends you mail, the cloud routes it all and places it in
your inbox. The next time your device polls for new email, you then
retrieve it.

On my iPhone, I have access to 50 million songs. I don't have to store
them all. I just have access to them all. I use YouTube Music. When I
like a song others are suggested and in general it's good at picking
songs I will like. That's a benefit of could computing.

When I request an Uber, the cloud calculates all the drivers near me and
the destination I have. It then finds me a driver suitable for my
destination. And this is international. That's the cloud. It's not just
the server client model of yesterday. We have cloud based file systems
and work units that span many machines into clusters. Cloud is much more
advanced technology.

Now small devices, the IoT, have lightweight operating systems of their
own. Devices that used to require a PC as sync point are going away if
not already gone. Now the device itself is capable of syncing with the
cloud. My iPhone is a good example of this. It has a direct relationship
with YouTube Music. The videos I like are downloaded directly from the
iPhone from YouTube. I no longer need a client, like a Mac or Windows. I
can be a Linux user and still enjoy the benefits of the iPhone or
Android as a separate issue.

You can call this market speak if you like. I say you're wrong about
that, but I don't see that at matters at all anyway. It's a benefit
offered to everyone. If you're excited about this opportunity and wish
to downplay it, that's your choice. I like "cloud" computing.


well said, and those examples are just scratching the surface of what
can be done.

some people just like to hate.
  #35  
Old December 29th 18, 08:45 PM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

nonsense. win10 works when not connected to any network and microsoft
*cannot* deactivate anyone at random because they feel like it, and
since there is no requirement to be online, there isn't any way they
could even if they wanted to.


The number of Windows 10 installations not connected to the internet
is miniscule.


it doesn't matter how many there are.

your claim was a win10 system was 'a terminal on microsoft's network':

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:
Basically with Windows 10 your PC is a terminal on
Microsoft's network


since win10 works offline without issue, that is clearly false, and
it's also false even when connected to the internet.

there are many reasons to not like win10, but that isn't one of them.

Once you are connected, they have control. Microsoft can
change their activation policy, as well as what happens to non-activated
systems, at any time.


actually, they can't.

if microsoft tried to randomly deactivate systems, there would be a
*lot* of backlash and a lot of lawsuits, plus whatever they did would
be ineffective for any system that's offline, as above.

As I said, product activation alone is enough to
keep me away from Microsoft products aside from any other considerations.


then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.

and it's not just software. cellphones, cable tv and many other
products require activation to work.
  #36  
Old December 29th 18, 09:20 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Roger Blake[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, Peter Kozlov wrote:
If you have an Android phone and you take photos, those photos upload to
Google and your storage on the local device is not hampered by the
storage limitations of you local device.


I don't have a smartphone, Android or otherwise.

Google's excellent AI is the result of cloud computing analysis which is
far greater than the mobile device itself.


I'm not interested in having a device that listens to everything around
it and uploads it.

When someone sends you mail, the cloud routes it all and places it in
your inbox. The next time your device polls for new email, you then
retrieve it.


I've been managing mail servers for decades. What you insist on
referring to as "the cloud" as though it is some magical thing
is just a collection of servers.

On my iPhone, I have access to 50 million songs. I don't have to store
them all.


I'm not interested in that. I prefer to store my own stuff rather than
trust it to someone else's server and network.

like a song others are suggested and in general it's good at picking
songs I will like. That's a benefit of could computing.


This and all of the things you refer to are simply exchanging data
with remote servers. That's what we did in the 1970s using terminals
connecting to computer service bureaus. (I was there.)

When I request an Uber, the cloud calculates all the drivers near me and


"The cloud" again is just someone else's server, or collection of servers.

You can call this market speak if you like. I say you're wrong about
that, but I don't see that at matters at all anyway. It's a benefit
offered to everyone. If you're excited about this opportunity and wish
to downplay it, that's your choice. I like "cloud" computing.


It is market speak, and I do not see it as a benefit. I prefer to keep
as much as possible under my own control.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)

NSA sedition and treason -- http://www.DeathToNSAthugs.com
Don't talk to cops! -- http://www.DontTalkToCops.com
Badges don't grant extra rights -- http://www.CopBlock.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  #37  
Old December 29th 18, 09:20 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Roger Blake[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, nospam wrote:
some people just like to hate.


Some people like to keep things under their own control and retain
a modicum of privacy.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)

NSA sedition and treason -- http://www.DeathToNSAthugs.com
Don't talk to cops! -- http://www.DontTalkToCops.com
Badges don't grant extra rights -- http://www.CopBlock.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  #38  
Old December 29th 18, 09:22 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Roger Blake[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, nospam wrote:
or your own hardware, and it's not nonsense. there's a lot of
functionality that is not possible any other way.


It is markeing nonsense. Conceptually it is no different than using
a terminal to log into a computer service bureau in 1975 because
your local device doesn't have sufficient storage or power on its
own.

not really.


Yes, really.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)

NSA sedition and treason -- http://www.DeathToNSAthugs.com
Don't talk to cops! -- http://www.DontTalkToCops.com
Badges don't grant extra rights -- http://www.CopBlock.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  #39  
Old December 29th 18, 09:28 PM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Roger Blake[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, nospam wrote:
since win10 works offline without issue, that is clearly false, and
it's also false even when connected to the internet.


No, it is not false when connected to the internet. Not while Microsoft
can control your "activation" status, what updates are delivered and
when, and has the ability to monitor how the computer is used.

if microsoft tried to randomly deactivate systems, there would be a
*lot* of backlash and a lot of lawsuits, plus whatever they did would
be ineffective for any system that's offline, as above.


I have seen Windows systems that would not even let the user log in
and refused to do anything without being activated. (Not Windows 10,
at least not yet.)

then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.


Not FOSS. None of the software that I use requires activation. Now
who is spreading falsehoods?

and it's not just software. cellphones, cable tv and many other
products require activation to work.


I don't use a smartphone and don't have cable TV.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)

NSA sedition and treason -- http://www.DeathToNSAthugs.com
Don't talk to cops! -- http://www.DontTalkToCops.com
Badges don't grant extra rights -- http://www.CopBlock.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  #40  
Old December 29th 18, 10:04 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Spooge
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 33
Default Excellent article about Linux

On Sat, 29 Dec 2018 20:20:42 -0000 (UTC), Roger Blake, tweeted:
On 2018-12-29, nospam wrote:
some people just like to hate.


Some people like to keep things under their own control and retain
a modicum of privacy.


Hopefully, your waitress never says "The usual?" to you.
Be an invasion of privacy

I like my iPhone, let it know where I am.
My wife knows where I am too.

--
[ ] Safeguard this message - it is an important historical document.
[ ] Delete after reading -- Subversive Literature.
[x] Ignore and go back to what you were doing.
  #41  
Old December 29th 18, 11:03 PM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

since win10 works offline without issue, that is clearly false, and
it's also false even when connected to the internet.


No, it is not false when connected to the internet. Not while Microsoft
can control your "activation" status, what updates are delivered and
when, and has the ability to monitor how the computer is used.


microsoft *can't* revoke activation because they feel like it.

you complained about iot devices not getting security updates and now
you're complaining about microsoft offering security updates. can't
have it both ways.

if microsoft tried to randomly deactivate systems, there would be a
*lot* of backlash and a lot of lawsuits, plus whatever they did would
be ineffective for any system that's offline, as above.


I have seen Windows systems that would not even let the user log in
and refused to do anything without being activated. (Not Windows 10,
at least not yet.)


that's not due to microsoft deciding to deactivate a system.

nothing is perfect and sometimes things don't work as expected.

most of the time it's due to the user doing something wrong or their
system is misconfigured and refusing to accept responsibility. less
often, it's buggy software.

there is no conspiracy to control what users do.

then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.


Not FOSS. None of the software that I use requires activation.


that's not representative of the industry and you know it.

Now
who is spreading falsehoods?


that would be you.

mainstream software, the stuff that people actually use to do real
work, requires activation in some form, including ms windows, ms
office, adobe photoshop, adobe lightroom, corel paintshop pro, avid
media composer, vmware and much more. email requires activating an
account with an email provider. google docs requires a google account.
the list goes on...

and it's not just software. cellphones, cable tv and many other
products require activation to work.


I don't use a smartphone and don't have cable TV.


i didn't say smartphone, but regardless, activation is required to use
them and other products.
  #42  
Old December 29th 18, 11:03 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

or your own hardware, and it's not nonsense. there's a lot of
functionality that is not possible any other way.


It is markeing nonsense.


there is nothing nonsense about it.

the cloud provides functionality not otherwise possible.

you personally might not be interested, but the rest of the world is.

Conceptually it is no different than using
a terminal to log into a computer service bureau in 1975 because
your local device doesn't have sufficient storage or power on its
own.


it's very different in all sorts of ways.

not really.


Yes, really.


no, not really.

your knowledge of the cloud is fueled by wildly incorrect and outdated
information, and what's worse, is you aren't interested in learning
about what it actually is and what can be done.

it's not 1975 anymore.
  #43  
Old December 29th 18, 11:03 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

If you have an Android phone and you take photos, those photos upload to
Google and your storage on the local device is not hampered by the
storage limitations of you local device.


I don't have a smartphone, Android or otherwise.


your loss. they're very capable devices that can do all sorts of things
that were once considered impossible.

Google's excellent AI is the result of cloud computing analysis which is
far greater than the mobile device itself.


I'm not interested in having a device that listens to everything around
it and uploads it.


where did you get the ridiculous idea that a phone listens to
everything around it and then uploads it? seriously, wtf???

the entire concept is ludicrous. it's tinfoil hat material.

not only would the battery be dead in a short time, but the cell system
would be overloaded with billions of people uploading all that data.

and then where does all that data go and who is going to analyze it
all? do you even realize how much data that would be? (no).

When someone sends you mail, the cloud routes it all and places it in
your inbox. The next time your device polls for new email, you then
retrieve it.


I've been managing mail servers for decades. What you insist on
referring to as "the cloud" as though it is some magical thing
is just a collection of servers.


the cloud is much more than 'just a collection of servers'.

that's like saying a computer is 'just a collection of transistors'.

On my iPhone, I have access to 50 million songs. I don't have to store
them all.


I'm not interested in that. I prefer to store my own stuff rather than
trust it to someone else's server and network.


it's more reliable than anything you could possibly do with your own
system, unless you have a similar budget as they do, which is extremely
unlikely.

like a song others are suggested and in general it's good at picking
songs I will like. That's a benefit of could computing.


This and all of the things you refer to are simply exchanging data
with remote servers. That's what we did in the 1970s using terminals
connecting to computer service bureaus. (I was there.)


you weren't streaming music or video in the 1970s, locally or the cloud.

When I request an Uber, the cloud calculates all the drivers near me and


"The cloud" again is just someone else's server, or collection of servers.


missing the point entirely.

You can call this market speak if you like. I say you're wrong about
that, but I don't see that at matters at all anyway. It's a benefit
offered to everyone. If you're excited about this opportunity and wish
to downplay it, that's your choice. I like "cloud" computing.


It is market speak, and I do not see it as a benefit. I prefer to keep
as much as possible under my own control.


nothing about the cloud prevents that.
  #44  
Old December 29th 18, 11:03 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,508
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

Some people like to keep things under their own control and retain
a modicum of privacy.


nothing about the cloud prevents that. in fact, encryption is often the
default.
  #45  
Old December 29th 18, 11:25 PM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Nomen Nescio[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

or your own hardware, and it's not nonsense. there's a lot of
functionality that is not possible any other way.


It is markeing nonsense.


there is nothing nonsense about it.

the cloud provides functionality not otherwise possible.

you personally might not be interested, but the rest of the world is.


Citation needed. Who are you to make such a declaration?

Conceptually it is no different than using
a terminal to log into a computer service bureau in 1975 because
your local device doesn't have sufficient storage or power on its
own.


it's very different in all sorts of ways.

not really.


Yes, really.


no, not really.

your knowledge of the cloud is fueled by wildly incorrect and
outdated information, and what's worse, is you aren't interested in
learning about what it actually is and what can be done.

it's not 1975 anymore.

 




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