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Excellent article about Linux



 
 
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  #61  
Old December 30th 18, 04:06 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,066
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 12/29/18 7:38 AM, Big Bad Bob wrote:
On 12/28/18 19:13, T wrote:
On 12/28/18 10:56 AM, Anonymous wrote:

A tour of elementary OS, perhaps the Linux world’s best hope for
the mainstream.

https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018/12/a-tour-of-elementary-os-perhaps-the-linux-worlds-best-hope-for-the-mainstream/


** It's systemd.* VOMIT!!!* DRY HEAVES!!!


I had the same reaction when I went from Scientific Linux (RHEL clone)
to Fedora.

Guess what?* Once you learn it and get past the cussing phase,
you will adore it.* So cowboy up!


no.* switch to FreeBSD or Devuan, instead.

"New" and/or "Shiny" does NOT equal "Better" and systemd forced WAY too
many people to re-learn for NO good reason, which is a *WASTE* *OF*
*TIME*.* If I spent a lot of time learning how to configure a system
with SysV startup, WHY should _I_ *HAVE* to CHANGE because a bunch of
self-centered MORONS "felt" as if I NEEDED to?

And I say that about a LOT of things "modern" *spit* since 2008-ish.
Change for the sake of change.* *NO* !!!* If it WORKS, _DO_ _NOT_
_BREAK_ _IT_ I say!!!* And that goes TRIPLE for what was done to UIs
through the 2D FLATTY FLAT FLATSO FLUGLY-ness, vs 3D skeuomorphic.* It's
not "modern".* It's ******.



It is not broken. It is actually a vast improvement. This is
not apparent until you pull all your hair out and learn new
works your mom would wash your mouth out with soap over and
actually learn the thing. I had to write two of them
myself to learn. I swore a lot. Cowboy up!


Ads
  #62  
Old December 30th 18, 06:10 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
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Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Peter Kozlov
wrote:

Some people like to keep things under their own control and retain
a modicum of privacy.


nothing about the cloud prevents that. in fact, encryption is often the
default.


I think SnapChat is encrypted end to end. I don't see the point of being
stuck in the past. I welcome and embrace new technologies. If it does
something I will benefit from, why wouldn't I want it?


exactly.

some people are stuck in the past and don't want to change. worse, they
base that on incorrect information about how things work.
  #63  
Old December 30th 18, 06:10 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
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Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Peter Kozlov
wrote:

or your own hardware, and it's not nonsense. there's a lot of
functionality that is not possible any other way.

It is markeing nonsense.

there is nothing nonsense about it.

the cloud provides functionality not otherwise possible.

you personally might not be interested, but the rest of the world is.

Citation needed. Who are you to make such a declaration?


the widespread popularity of many, many different cloud services is
ample proof.


There are something like 2 billion mobile devices users and I think
that's the active number. That's a hell of a lot.


yep, and then there are all the laptops and desktops and other systems,
all of which are online.

facebook has roughly 2.3 billion users and just about everyone has at
least one email account. many people have throwaways.

nearly all businesses have web sites, and for those that don't, there's
usually information to be found online.

just about everyone uses the internet in some form or another, except
those who live on a remote island.
  #64  
Old December 30th 18, 06:10 AM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
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Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Carlos E. R.
wrote:

As I said, product activation alone is enough to
keep me away from Microsoft products aside from any other considerations.


then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.


Well, no, that's not totally true. I know you don't like Linux, but as
the thread has Linux on the subject line, and I'm replying on a Linux
group, I feel entitled to say that there is no activation needed to use
or update Linux :-P


i like linux for what it's good at, servers. i have six servers, all
running linux.

linux is not good for a desktop os. mac and windows are vastly more
capable, with a much wider selection of software, and generally much,
much better quality.

Also, I bought an Android tablet some time ago that required no
activation or subscription. Yes, it runs Android, but needs no google ID
to get updates, albeit not from Google Play.


that's the exception, not the rule, and it would be surprising and also
undesirable if there was *no* activation at all.

one key advantage of being linked to a google or apple id is that a
stolen device can be remotely wiped and/or deactivated, leaving the
thief with nothing more than something to part out.
  #65  
Old December 30th 18, 06:10 AM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
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Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

microsoft *can't* revoke activation because they feel like it.


Of course they can. If not due to concious activity, due to bugs
in their activation system.


no, they can't.

the moment microsoft revokes someone's activation because they feel
like it is the moment a lawyer gets a phone call.

all of the tech blogs and major news outlets will run it as a lead
story. it would be suicide for microsoft to even consider it.

bugs can happen, but that's an entirely separate issue, unrelated to
activation.

you complained about iot devices not getting security updates and now
you're complaining about microsoft offering security updates. can't
have it both ways.


On my computer I want control of updates. Microsoft has largely removed
the ability to do that. In the Home version you have no control at all.
Some limited control in Pro.


microsoft, google and others are in a *much* better position to track
and manage security exploits and necessary patches than end users.

you criticized iot devices as not having any security updates, which
can pose a major risk (a valid concern), but yet you want to block
security updates on your own systems. that's a contradiction.

that's not due to microsoft deciding to deactivate a system.


Even if due to deficiencies in their activation system it is completely
unacceptable.

nothing is perfect and sometimes things don't work as expected.


Then an activation system that can lock the user out of his or her
own computer is not acceptable.

most of the time it's due to the user doing something wrong or their
system is misconfigured and refusing to accept responsibility. less
often, it's buggy software.


An activation system that can lock the user out of his or her own
computer is not acceptable.


except that the activation system doesn't do that.

users often lock themselves out, usually by forgetting their password
or ****ing up some access policy. that's not microsoft's fault.

there is no conspiracy to control what users do.


I didn't say there was a conspiracy.


you're going on as if there is one.

you're claiming that microsoft and other companies have control they
don't actually have, such as remotely enabling or disabling computers
and apps, which has all the makings of a conspiracy.

then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.

Not FOSS. None of the software that I use requires activation.


that's not representative of the industry and you know it.


Oh, how many web servers run Apache on top of Linux? You said NEARLY ALL
SOFTWARE TODAY has activation in some form. You are lying. There are thousands
of FOSS operating systems and applications used throughout the industry
and you know it.


you know quite well it meant end user software (ms office, photoshop,
etc.), not apache or other server software. only server admins deal
with apache, not the masses, and some server software *does* require
activation.

that would be you.


No, that would be you. You continue lying through your teeth.


nope, and resorting to ad hominems means you're grasping.

mainstream software, the stuff that people actually use to do real


You are lying once again. You did not say "mainstream software" - you
said "NEARLY ALL SOFTWARE TODAY." You of course have been caught in
a blatant lie, so you move the goalposts.


nope. you are trying to weasel out of not understanding what was
written.

As I said, NONE of the software that I use requires activation.


yippie for you, but you're not representative of the entire industry.

microsoft office and adobe photoshop, two of the most widely used apps
on the planet (and most widely pirated) *do* require activation.

countless other apps do as well.

i didn't say smartphone, but regardless, activation is required to use
them and other products.


You are conflating subscribing to a service with activating a piece of
software running on a device that you own. Lies, lies, and more lies.


nope.

smartphones need to be activated even without cellular service to be
used as a portable wifi-only computer, music player, etc. tablets might
not even have a cellular radio, but also require activation.
  #66  
Old December 30th 18, 06:10 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:

your loss. they're very capable devices that can do all sorts of things
that were once considered impossible.


I don't see it as a loss. Nothing they provide is worth the tracking and
surveillance aspects. There is nothing a smartphone can do that I need
or want.


the 'tracking and surveillance' can be disabled, and it doesn't do what
you think it does.

the entire concept is ludicrous. it's tinfoil hat material.


As in Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty Four" it may not be listening all the
time, but you don't know when or where it might be.


now you're backpedaling about the listening all the time.

you conveniently snipped it, so here it is again, because it's *so*
detached from reality that it needs to be repeated:

In article , Roger Blake
wrote:
I'm not interested in having a device that listens to everything around
it and uploads it.


seriously, wtf.

At a minimum it has
to be listening for keywords to activate the AI functions and you don't
really know when or where it may be doing more.


keyword detection is done locally, but if that bothers you, it can be
disabled, as can the assistant entirely.

Devices such as Alexa
and Google Home don't even have the battery concern.


but they do have the bandwidth concern, and people have sniffed it and
found nothing.

they are also not smartphones. you're moving the goalposts.

smartphones do a wide range of things. they're a computer that fits in
a pocket.

an amazon echo is basically a voice assistant, which is far more
limited than a phone, although better at being an assistant.

different devices optimized for different tasks.

Then of course there
is the GPS function that tracks everywhere you go.


it doesn't, but again, if that bothers you, location services can be
disabled, either on a per-app basis or globally, and change that at any
time for any reason.

the downside is that some apps might not work well (or at all), but
that's the tradeoff each person makes for themselves and the apps they
choose to use.

and keep in mind that the cell carrier knows everywhere you go based on
cell tower pings, even if you have a 'dumb phone' that does not have a
gps. surveillance cameras are also common, both for businesses and
residential. in china, they're using facial recognition to identify
jaywalkers, no phone required.

(How else is Siri
going to recommend restaurants that are near you?)


'near you' doesn't require any tracking. it only needs to know where
you are *right* *now*, and the siri request is anonymous anyway.

if you don't want siri (or any other app) to know where you are right
now or at any other time, then disable location services for specific
apps or systemwide.

as i said, some apps might not work properly with location off, but
that's up to each user to decide.

and with location services disabled, you can still get restaurant
recommendations, weather, etc. for a particular location simply by
specifying the location, e.g., "what's the weather in los angeles?" or
"what time is it in london?"

You might want to look up a guy named Ed Snowden if you believe that
being concerned about mass surveillance is merely "tinfoil hat material."


i'm quite familiar with ed snowden.

i'm also quite familiar with how mobile devices actually work, not how
the fear mongers think they work.

the cloud is much more than 'just a collection of servers'.


It is not. I've been working in technology for over 40 years and the
internet for over 35 years. If it looks like a duck and quacks like a
duck... guess what, it's a duck.


not all ducks are the same, nor are duck recipes.

in other words, what matters is what the server actually *does* for the
user, which is a very wide range of things.

there is no single 'cloud service'.

another thing you're missing is it being always-on, which is a game
changer. gone are the days of dial-up and modems, and back in the '70s,
those were often acoustic.

it's more reliable than anything you could possibly do with your own
system, unless you have a similar budget as they do, which is extremely
unlikely.


Nonsense. It is not difficult to implement one's own effective backup
regimen.


not at the level of a cloud backup service, whose entire business model
is data reliability. such services can't afford to lose data, otherwise
they go out of business.

for example:
https://aws.amazon.com/s3/faqs/#How_durable_is_Amazon_S3
Amazon S3 Standard, S3 Standard*IA, S3 One Zone-IA, and S3 Glacier
are all designed to provide 99.999999999% durability of objects over
a given year. This durability level corresponds to an average annual
expected loss of 0.000000001% of objects. For example, if you store
10,000,000 objects with Amazon S3, you can on average expect to incur
a loss of a single object once every 10,000 years. In addition,
Amazon S3 Standard, S3 Standard-IA, and S3 Glacier are all designed
to sustain data in the event of an entire S3 Availability Zone loss.

nothing a home user could possibly do can come anywhere close to that.

and if a home user *did* want offsite backups, either they shuttle
drives back and forth (a pain, so it won't be done often enough), or
they'd that thing called 'the cloud'...

If you think no one has ever lost anything in "thuh cloud"
you're delusionary. Start with the people who lost their stuff with
due to a bug in the Windows 10 1809 update.


the win10 1809 data loss bug was not a cloud issue and most people were
not affected anyway.

of those who were, only those without backups lost data.

in fact, those who *did* have cloud backups were likely the ones with
the most up to date backups.

you weren't streaming music or video in the 1970s, locally or the cloud.


That is irrelevent. From an architectural standpoint it is the same
type of client-server concept. You have a local device whose limitaions
require computing power and storage at a remote location. The actual
application does not change the fundamental concept, nor does it change
simply because you are using a smartphone with "thuh cloud" instead of
a terminal connecting to a remote mainframe.


it's not irrelevant at all.

there's a *huge* difference between an always-on device with a several
hundred wireless megabit link and fits in a pocket, versus a dumb 24x80
text-only terminal with dial-up using 300 baud acoustic modem.

what can be done today is nothing short of amazing.

also, the remote system might be *less* capable than the local one.
consider a high end workstation with multiple gpus connecting to a
lowly file server to back up the final version of the project.

missing the point entirely.


I would say you do not even have a point.


then you'd be wrong on that too.

nothing about the cloud prevents that.


When processing and storage is taking place on someone else's servers
(which once again is all that "thuh cloud" really is), then you effectively
do not have control. You really have no idea where your data is being
stored, who will have access to it under what conditions, or even if
you will have access to it in the future.


not true.

again, the cloud can be a lot of things, including being hosted on
one's own equipment, not someone else's servers.

local or remote, always encrypt anything for which you want to limit
access.

not using the cloud will not stop someone from examining a local hard
drive.
  #67  
Old December 30th 18, 07:27 AM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Peter Kozlov[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 2018-12-29, nospam wrote:
In article , Carlos E. R.
wrote:

As I said, product activation alone is enough to
keep me away from Microsoft products aside from any other considerations.

then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.


Well, no, that's not totally true. I know you don't like Linux, but as
the thread has Linux on the subject line, and I'm replying on a Linux
group, I feel entitled to say that there is no activation needed to use
or update Linux :-P


i like linux for what it's good at, servers. i have six servers, all
running linux.


Linux is crushing it on the server side.

linux is not good for a desktop os. mac and windows are vastly more
capable, with a much wider selection of software, and generally much,
much better quality.


The Mac and certainly Windows could learn a thing or two from Linux.
Linux is versatile. You have your choice of desktop environments and
total control over the file systems.

Apple on the other hand has the cash and the resources to build custom
hardware and advance their ideas into products. They have the retail
footprint to reach the masses. The iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch
are all testaments of these capabilities. Once Apple decides they are no
longer interested in something, think Aperture, it just gets killed and
that's a shame.

Also, I bought an Android tablet some time ago that required no
activation or subscription. Yes, it runs Android, but needs no google ID
to get updates, albeit not from Google Play.


that's the exception, not the rule, and it would be surprising and also
undesirable if there was *no* activation at all.

one key advantage of being linked to a google or apple id is that a
stolen device can be remotely wiped and/or deactivated, leaving the
thief with nothing more than something to part out.


Google is crushing it for services. Siri isn't even close to Google's
assistant. Apple needs to step up their game. Google's presentation and
Io with the AI making an appointment for the user was jaw dropping
amazing. Huawei has under the screen finger print scanning. I like touch
id more so that face id.

--
Peter Kozlov
  #68  
Old December 30th 18, 09:47 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mike Scott
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 29/12/2018 17:37, Wolf K wrote:
On 2018-12-29 03:20, Mike Scott wrote:
On 28/12/2018 22:31, Nomen Nescio wrote:
...
**I will not go beyond Windows 7.* ....



Unfortunately, some organizations seem to think they don't need to
support anything else. Two come instantly to mind that cause me some
grief. Supply your own company names :-)

Car GPS unit updates require windows - they don't even support vista
now. Fortunately I have an old laptop that sits in the cupboard, but
its time is running out.

Music score electronic downloads. (Linux? Tough! That was the attitude
when I complained).

The first I could sort-of understand. The second, just laziness or
maybe management ignorance. I strongly suspect there's a breed of
programmer that's too lazy (or just too incompetent) to abstract out
the OS interface from their code.


Seems to me that you expect a lot from the epopel who develop the free
stuff.


Who said anything about "free"?

Both are paid-for services. Both suffer from blinkered design decisions
and/or bad implementation.


But there seems nothing the user can do -- there are no alternatives
to those suppliers.


There are alternatives, such as rolling your own (which you can do with
Linux, if you have the skills). At one time, everything was an


I have the skills, or can acquire them - I don't have the time to
reinvent every wheel that someone elsewhere has made something other
than round.



--
Mike Scott
Harlow, England
  #69  
Old December 30th 18, 11:17 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Michael Logies
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 171
Default Excellent article about Linux

On Sun, 30 Dec 2018 01:01:33 -0000 (UTC), Roger Blake
wrote:

At a minimum it has
to be listening for keywords to activate the AI functions and you don't
really know when or where it may be doing more.


More people should use them:
https://safety.google/privacy/privacy-controls/
  #70  
Old December 30th 18, 11:36 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
The Natural Philosopher[_2_]
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Posts: 118
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 29/12/2018 19:06, Peter Kozlov wrote:
If you have an Android phone and you take photos, those photos upload to
Google and your storage on the local device is not hampered by the
storage limitations of you local device.


No, they dont.

Google's excellent AI is the result of cloud computing analysis which is
far greater than the mobile device itself.

When someone sends you mail, the cloud routes it all and places it in
your inbox. The next time your device polls for new email, you then
retrieve it.


No, it doesn't.

On my iPhone, I have access to 50 million songs. I don't have to store
them all. I just have access to them all. I use YouTube Music. When I
like a song others are suggested and in general it's good at picking
songs I will like. That's a benefit of could computing.


'could' computing? 'could' be secure I guess..

When I request an Uber, the cloud calculates all the drivers near me and
the destination I have. It then finds me a driver suitable for my
destination. And this is international. That's the cloud. It's not just
the server client model of yesterday. We have cloud based file systems
and work units that span many machines into clusters. Cloud is much more
advanced technology.

Now small devices, the IoT, have lightweight operating systems of their
own. Devices that used to require a PC as sync point are going away if
not already gone. Now the device itself is capable of syncing with the
cloud. My iPhone is a good example of this. It has a direct relationship
with YouTube Music. The videos I like are downloaded directly from the
iPhone from YouTube. I no longer need a client, like a Mac or Windows. I
can be a Linux user and still enjoy the benefits of the iPhone or
Android as a separate issue.

You can call this market speak if you like. I say you're wrong about
that, but I don't see that at matters at all anyway. It's a benefit
offered to everyone. If you're excited about this opportunity and wish
to downplay it, that's your choice. I like "cloud" computing.


You are just fundanentally a lazy **** whio is happy to let bad
programmers ru(i)n your life.

Your choice.

-- Peter Kozlov



--
"The most difficult subjects can be explained to the most slow witted
man if he has not formed any idea of them already; but the simplest
thing cannot be made clear to the most intelligent man if he is firmly
persuaded that he knows already, without a shadow of doubt, what is laid
before him."

- Leo Tolstoy

  #71  
Old December 30th 18, 11:38 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
The Natural Philosopher[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 118
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 30/12/2018 01:04, Roger Blake wrote:
I have no need or desire for any of the things you describe.


Apple : the company that constantly tells me of things I never knew I
didn’t want to buy off them.

--
Truth welcomes investigation because truth knows investigation will lead
to converts. It is deception that uses all the other techniques.
  #72  
Old December 30th 18, 11:39 AM posted to alt.privacy.anon-server,alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
The Natural Philosopher[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 118
Default Excellent article about Linux

On 30/12/2018 05:10, nospam wrote:
some people are stuck in the past and don't want to change. worse, they
base that on incorrect information about how things work.


Some people are stuck in 'progress' and need to change all the time
needlessly. worse, they base that on incorrect information about how
things work.

--
Truth welcomes investigation because truth knows investigation will lead
to converts. It is deception that uses all the other techniques.
  #73  
Old December 30th 18, 02:12 PM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Peter Kozlov
wrote:

As I said, product activation alone is enough to
keep me away from Microsoft products aside from any other
considerations.

then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.

Well, no, that's not totally true. I know you don't like Linux, but as
the thread has Linux on the subject line, and I'm replying on a Linux
group, I feel entitled to say that there is no activation needed to use
or update Linux :-P


i like linux for what it's good at, servers. i have six servers, all
running linux.


Linux is crushing it on the server side.


yep, as well as embedded devices, such as routers and iot devices,
although those mostly aren't what one would consider a linux box. it's
not like someone is going to install libre office on a thermostat even
though the thermostat runs linux.

linux is not good for a desktop os. mac and windows are vastly more
capable, with a much wider selection of software, and generally much,
much better quality.


The Mac and certainly Windows could learn a thing or two from Linux.
Linux is versatile.


they're all versatile, but in different ways.

no single product is ideal for every task.
choose the best tool for the job.

You have your choice of desktop environments and
total control over the file systems.


there's full control over the file system, however, system files have
restrictions for security (which can be overridden when needed), just
like on linux.

Apple on the other hand has the cash and the resources to build custom
hardware and advance their ideas into products.


and that's exactly what they're doing, including designing arm-based
processors for ios devices and assorted other chips in many other
products. they have more than 10,000 employees doing chip design.

they're also doing something in the automotive space, but exactly what
nobody knows, other than those directly involved and they ain't talking
(and probably don't know the full scope themselves either).

They have the retail
footprint to reach the masses. The iPod, iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch
are all testaments of these capabilities. Once Apple decides they are no
longer interested in something, think Aperture, it just gets killed and
that's a shame.


it's not that apple wasn't interested in aperture, but rather not
enough users were.

aperture didn't sell in sufficient numbers. products that don't sell
well are eventually discontinued. there's no point in putting resources
into something that isn't generating revenue to support it.

lightroom won that race for a variety of reasons, including having very
tight integration with photoshop and being faster than aperture,
although aperture's speed did improve in later versions.

Also, I bought an Android tablet some time ago that required no
activation or subscription. Yes, it runs Android, but needs no google ID
to get updates, albeit not from Google Play.


that's the exception, not the rule, and it would be surprising and also
undesirable if there was *no* activation at all.

one key advantage of being linked to a google or apple id is that a
stolen device can be remotely wiped and/or deactivated, leaving the
thief with nothing more than something to part out.


Google is crushing it for services. Siri isn't even close to Google's
assistant. Apple needs to step up their game. Google's presentation and
Io with the AI making an appointment for the user was jaw dropping
amazing.


it was (although somewhat canned), but that's a very different product
than google assistant, siri, cortana, alexa, etc.

Huawei has under the screen finger print scanning. I like touch
id more so that face id.


fingerprint scanning through the display is not that fast and not that
accurate either.

apple's face id is more secure than a fingerprint sensor and very
convenient in winter months when people are wearing gloves.

unfortunately, face unlock on other phones is not very good. samsung's
can be spoofed with a selfie taken on another phone, something which
was demoed minutes after it was announced, in the hands-on area.
  #74  
Old December 30th 18, 03:11 PM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Dan Purgert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 78
Default Excellent article about Linux

Roger Blake wrote:
On 2018-12-29, nospam wrote:
then you won't be using computers anymore, since nearly all software
today has activation in some form due to rampant piracy.


Not FOSS. None of the software that I use requires activation. Now
who is spreading falsehoods?


I kinda want to write something now that has an "activation" code.

"Please email '..." // autoresponse "glad you grabbed
the software, the passcode is 12345. Source here (link)".

I'm bad at programming though, so whatever it is would probably be
useless .


--
|_|O|_| Registered Linux user #585947
|_|_|O| Github: https://github.com/dpurgert
|O|O|O| PGP: 05CA 9A50 3F2E 1335 4DC5 4AEE 8E11 DDF3 1279 A281
  #75  
Old December 30th 18, 08:28 PM posted to alt.os.linux,comp.os.linux.misc,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,498
Default Excellent article about Linux

In article , Wolf K
wrote:

Linux is crushing it on the server side.


yep, as well as embedded devices, such as routers and iot devices,
although those mostly aren't what one would consider a linux box. it's
not like someone is going to install libre office on a thermostat even
though the thermostat runs linux


AIUI, these embedded versions of Linux are basically kernel plus custom
code. IOW, you'd have to add code to run anything other than thermostat
control.


yep (although it varies as to how much), which is why an embedded
device that uses linux is very different than a linux box on someone's
desk or in a server closet.
 




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