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How to use Acronis to backup o/s ?



 
 
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  #196  
Old January 30th 09, 01:56 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richie Hardwick[_2_]
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Posts: 159
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:42:10 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:36:45 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:32:05 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:22:36 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:18:09 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:12:30 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:07:54 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

So... what was all that about how to clone a drive/disk to a single
partition, and then doing it again later to another partition... so
that one could keep "generational copies"??

I personally don't think you can do that. Maybe you can???

You own Casper, don't you? TRY it.

****, okay, I'll try it and report back.

Don't bother. It can be done... I did it yesterday to test it out.

Keeping multiple images with Acronis is much simpler if one wants that
ability.

Richie Hardwick

You can't boot the Copy, I just tried it.
I can boot my Clone, not my Copy.

You tried something else.

Nope. I used "Copy a specific drive".

To be bootable, it's gotta be in the Primary partition.

Trust me: ALL such copies will be "bootable" (an EXACT duplicate)
except for the above limitation - they HAVE to be if they are going to
be "reverse-clonable" to restore the system partition.

My second drive has D and E.

My copy is on D

It wouldn't boot.

That's all I know.


You did something wrong. It worked on mine yesterday and it just
worked again.

On TWO internal drives (I have four counting my system drive - plus
two externals).

Richie


Is the partition you booted from marked "Active" when you look in disk
management?

Ps It's hard to do something wrong when I just copied C to D.

I unplugged my C drive and plugged the second drive in that connector
on my MB.

"No boot device available"


DID you go into your BIOS and make SURE the new disk is first in the
boot order????
Ads
  #197  
Old January 30th 09, 02:09 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richie Hardwick[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 21:04:29 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:56:28 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:42:10 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:36:45 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:32:05 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:22:36 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:18:09 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:12:30 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:07:54 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

So... what was all that about how to clone a drive/disk to a single
partition, and then doing it again later to another partition... so
that one could keep "generational copies"??

I personally don't think you can do that. Maybe you can???

You own Casper, don't you? TRY it.

****, okay, I'll try it and report back.

Don't bother. It can be done... I did it yesterday to test it out.

Keeping multiple images with Acronis is much simpler if one wants that
ability.

Richie Hardwick

You can't boot the Copy, I just tried it.
I can boot my Clone, not my Copy.

You tried something else.

Nope. I used "Copy a specific drive".

To be bootable, it's gotta be in the Primary partition.

Trust me: ALL such copies will be "bootable" (an EXACT duplicate)
except for the above limitation - they HAVE to be if they are going to
be "reverse-clonable" to restore the system partition.

My second drive has D and E.

My copy is on D

It wouldn't boot.

That's all I know.

You did something wrong. It worked on mine yesterday and it just
worked again.

On TWO internal drives (I have four counting my system drive - plus
two externals).

Richie

Is the partition you booted from marked "Active" when you look in disk
management?

Ps It's hard to do something wrong when I just copied C to D.

I unplugged my C drive and plugged the second drive in that connector
on my MB.

"No boot device available"


DID you go into your BIOS and make SURE the new disk is first in the
boot order????


I didn't have to. I took out the C drive plug and plugged in the Copied
drive.


Check again. If you have any other drives connected at bootup - even
USB drives - they might have moved up in the boot order.
  #198  
Old January 30th 09, 02:13 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richie Hardwick[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 21:05:46 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:49:07 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:42:10 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:36:45 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:32:05 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:22:36 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:18:09 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 19:12:30 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:07:54 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

So... what was all that about how to clone a drive/disk to a single
partition, and then doing it again later to another partition... so
that one could keep "generational copies"??

I personally don't think you can do that. Maybe you can???

You own Casper, don't you? TRY it.

****, okay, I'll try it and report back.

Don't bother. It can be done... I did it yesterday to test it out.

Keeping multiple images with Acronis is much simpler if one wants that
ability.

Richie Hardwick

You can't boot the Copy, I just tried it.
I can boot my Clone, not my Copy.

You tried something else.

Nope. I used "Copy a specific drive".

To be bootable, it's gotta be in the Primary partition.

Trust me: ALL such copies will be "bootable" (an EXACT duplicate)
except for the above limitation - they HAVE to be if they are going to
be "reverse-clonable" to restore the system partition.

My second drive has D and E.

My copy is on D

It wouldn't boot.

That's all I know.

You did something wrong. It worked on mine yesterday and it just
worked again.

On TWO internal drives (I have four counting my system drive - plus
two externals).

Richie

Is the partition you booted from marked "Active" when you look in disk
management?

Ps It's hard to do something wrong when I just copied C to D.

I unplugged my C drive and plugged the second drive in that connector
on my MB.

"No boot device available"


Don't know what to tell you. It works fine here, so I absolutely KNOW
you're doing something wrong.

I even used Casper to make an "incremental clone" of yesterday's after
I installed a .NET update and a Defender update today.


Did you make an incremental Clone or incremental Copy?

You said you booted off a copy, not a clone.


sigh

I used COPY A SPECIFIC DRIVE.

I copied to an EXISTING PARTITION

Then I restarted, set the boot order, and booted to that partition.

I did it with a system disk with only a single partition AND a system
disk with two partitions (used Acronis Disk Director to add the second
partition).

Worked either way.

When I made the incremental clone, I used the shortcut from the first
COPY TO A SPECIFIC DRIVE to make it.
  #199  
Old January 30th 09, 03:11 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Bill in Co.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,106
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

WaIIy wrote:
On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 13:04:51 -0700, "Bill in Co."
wrote:

Mike Torello wrote:
"Bill in Co." wrote:

Mike Torello wrote:
"Bill in Co." wrote:

Again... download and take the time to digest the material in the
user
guide. It is quite simple to follow - easier than one of Anna's
treatises... and might even include less text.

Too simple, to the point of being a bit too simplistic, although the
general
ideas are covered.

I'm talking about what partition copying IS, or is NOT. I've used
ATI,
BING, and PM, so I think I've got a pretty good understanding of the
*underlying concepts* here which have nothing to do with the specific
program being used, except as to which technique is or is not being
used.

You can keep this conversation alive if you like. I am satisfied that
the partition copying results in an IDENTICAL copy.

Pony up the bucks, try it out and report back if/when you find
differently. Until then all you can do is guess - and continue to
qualify your guesses with the disclaimer that you've never used the
program.

Actually, it won't take any guessing if you (or whoever) just check it
out
yourself.

To see if it is a bonafide sector-by-sector partition copy, look at the
sizes of the two partitions (i.e., on the source and destination drive)
after the operation is complete. And also look at the copied folder
date
and time stamps, and see if they are the same as on the source
partition.
A true generational copy will also maintain the original folder and
subfolder dates, in addition to the sizes of the partitions themselves
(note: size of the partition, and NOT the amount of the data inside;
BIG
difference there).

You are wrong again (who woulda thunk it!?). A partition/disk can be
cloned with the resulting clone being either larger, smaller or the
same size as the original.


That is NOT a partition copy, at the disk sector level. They are not
identical.

Also, did you, or did you not, check the folder dates on the destination
drive, to see if they were identical to those on the source drive
partition?
I notice you didn't address that, and it would be useful to know. You
could easily check it in windows explorer.


I just checked and my C drive C:\Windows folder is dated June 20, 2008
1:48 PM and so is my C:\Windows on my backup, cloned drive.


I am NOT talking about the case of cloning a source drive, which makes a
perfect clone of the source drive.

I *am* talking about partition copying, apparently called "Copy Drive" in
Casper. Like the case mentioned where the source drive partition size was
supposedly 27 GB *in capacity* and the destination drive partition was
supposedly 37 GB in capacity (and NOT the amount of DATA).

Both types of information (disk partition capacity and used data space) can
be determined by using Windows Explorer with a right mouse click on the
drive letter in windows explorer and reading the information there.

And presumably there ARE different folder AND subfolder dates of the folders
on the destination drive (which I am saying will all be date stamped with
the date the copy is made!). THAT is what specifically needs to be
checked.

UNLESS both the source and destination partitions are identical in SIZE
(meaning capacity) and all folder/subfolder datetime stamps, they are NOT
really identical.


  #200  
Old January 30th 09, 03:14 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Bill in Co.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,106
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

Mike Torello wrote:
WaIIy wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2009 23:19:41 -0600, Mike Torello
wrote:

WaIIy wrote:

On Wed, 28 Jan 2009 20:41:49 -0700, "Bill in Co."
wrote:

WaIIy wrote:
On Wed, 28 Jan 2009 13:35:38 -0700, "Bill in Co."
wrote:

WaIIy wrote:

I have the option to clone the drive or copy it. I copied it to an
existing partition on my second internal drive.

I think the message for copying reads something like "copy a
partition"
so I just copied the whole C drive which is one partition to
an existing partition on my second drive (which has 2 partitions).

OK, then presumably Casper handles it behind the scenes by first
deleting that partition and then creating it WHEN it copies the
source
drive partition to the destination drive. (In contrast, using
Boot
It NG, which
does less hand holding, *you* must FIRST mark that space as
"Unallocated" on the destination drive (or delete the partition
there),
and only THEN will it
do the partition copy operation.

In my case, I copied (not cloned) the C drive to a partition (D) on
my
destination drive. I have D and E on my destination drive.


The existing partition I copied to was and is 37 gigs, the copy
takes
up 27 gigs

That's because the pre-existing partition there was deleted in the
copy
partition operation (and effectively recreated as this new and
smaller
one).

"Was and is" The destination drive had partition D of 37 gigs. The
copy was 27 gigs. The partition is still 37 gigs.
Casper didn't touch it.

Then it's not a true "partition copy" in the normal usage of the term,
since the source and destination partitions are NOT identical. If
what
you said is true, then apparently it's only copying the data contents
of
what's inside the partition, and is NOT making identical partitions.
(I'm talking about the size of the partition here, NOT the total size
of
the data inside!. For example, my main C: partition is 40 GB in
size,
but only half of it is in use at this point (about 20 GB of data).


I agree, the partitions are not identical.

The stuff in them seems to be, although my copy is not bootable from
the
outset.

I "think" "possibly" it can be made bootable, but not quite sure.

It's gotta be. What about when you copy a single-partitioned system
disk to a partition on a second drive.

It's not an image. If it ain't bootable, what good is it as a
backup!?


I'm talking the "Copy" not the clone.


From looking at both options as they appear in the User Guide, there's
no difference.


Sigh, I think you're hopeless. Didn't you just say that? :-)


  #201  
Old January 30th 09, 03:32 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Rob Talley
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Posts: 47
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 21:29:06 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:13:42 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:


I used COPY A SPECIFIC DRIVE.


me too

I copied to an EXISTING PARTITION


Me too

Then I restarted, set the boot order, and booted to that partition.

I did it with a system disk with only a single partition AND a system
disk with two partitions (used Acronis Disk Director to add the second
partition).

Worked either way.

When I made the incremental clone, I used the shortcut from the first
COPY TO A SPECIFIC DRIVE to make it.


I asked if the partition you booted to was (is) marked "Active"
is it?


Healthy, Active and Primary
  #202  
Old January 30th 09, 03:38 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richie Hardwick[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:11:57 -0700, "Bill in Co."
wrote:

I just checked and my C drive C:\Windows folder is dated June 20, 2008
1:48 PM and so is my C:\Windows on my backup, cloned drive.


I am NOT talking about the case of cloning a source drive, which makes a
perfect clone of the source drive.

I *am* talking about partition copying, apparently called "Copy Drive" in
Casper. Like the case mentioned where the source drive partition size was
supposedly 27 GB *in capacity* and the destination drive partition was
supposedly 37 GB in capacity (and NOT the amount of DATA).

Both types of information (disk partition capacity and used data space) can
be determined by using Windows Explorer with a right mouse click on the
drive letter in windows explorer and reading the information there.

And presumably there ARE different folder AND subfolder dates of the folders
on the destination drive (which I am saying will all be date stamped with
the date the copy is made!). THAT is what specifically needs to be
checked.

UNLESS both the source and destination partitions are identical in SIZE
(meaning capacity) and all folder/subfolder datetime stamps, they are NOT
really identical.


YOU are a moron. A thick-skulled idiot. A fool. A buffoon. A
clown. Take your pick.

You apparently haven't even taken the time to look at the User Guide.

Go play with BING - or yourself. Whichever gives you the biggest
thrill. You have no credibility when it comes to talking about Casper
with people who own it and use it.
  #203  
Old January 30th 09, 03:40 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richie Hardwick[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 159
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 21:16:25 -0500, WaIIy wrote:

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:09:24 -0600, Richie Hardwick
wrote:


Check again. If you have any other drives connected at bootup - even
USB drives - they might have moved up in the boot order.


It's always good to double check.

I only had two drives connected.

Actually, only the one which I put in the place of my regular C drive
on the motherboard.

I unplugged my C drive.


I can only tell you that whatever I try here - and I've tried
everything Casper can do - it freakin' works.

I guarantee that you are screwing something up.

Master/Slave jumper????
  #204  
Old January 30th 09, 04:06 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Bill in Co.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,106
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD

Richie Hardwick wrote:
On Thu, 29 Jan 2009 20:11:57 -0700, "Bill in Co."
wrote:

I just checked and my C drive C:\Windows folder is dated June 20, 2008
1:48 PM and so is my C:\Windows on my backup, cloned drive.


I am NOT talking about the case of cloning a source drive, which makes a
perfect clone of the source drive.

I *am* talking about partition copying, apparently called "Copy Drive" in
Casper. Like the case mentioned where the source drive partition size
was
supposedly 27 GB *in capacity* and the destination drive partition was
supposedly 37 GB in capacity (and NOT the amount of DATA).

Both types of information (disk partition capacity and used data space)
can
be determined by using Windows Explorer with a right mouse click on the
drive letter in windows explorer and reading the information there.

And presumably there ARE different folder AND subfolder dates of the
folders
on the destination drive (which I am saying will all be date stamped with
the date the copy is made!). THAT is what specifically needs to be
checked.

UNLESS both the source and destination partitions are identical in SIZE
(meaning capacity) and all folder/subfolder datetime stamps, they are NOT
really identical.


YOU are a moron. A thick-skulled idiot.


That's right, go for the ad hominems, Richie. And that says more about
you, than me, (but I imagine that concept is a bit advanced for you).

You apparently haven't even taken the time to look at the User Guide.


True, I don't have it, or Casper installed at this point. I was asking
about it, but getting some pretty ambiguous answers, yourself included.

If no one here understands what a sector-to-sector copy is, which is the
only true and identical partition copy process, I can't help that.


  #205  
Old January 30th 09, 05:46 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Bill in Co.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,106
Default Using Casper 5 disk-cloning program to clone multi-partitioned HDD



If no one here understands what a sector-to-sector copy is, which is the
only true and identical partition copy process, I can't help that.


I guess this is a bit incomplete. Let me expand on this. Why would
anyone care or want it? For two reasons:

1). It completely and accurately preserves the integrity of the source
partition, and is an EXACT copy. And that can be useful for debugging
purposes. (If you've ever "been there", you know what I mean, but that is
another topic)

2). Because the partition copy operation is done disk sector-by-sector at
the disk partition level, and NOT at just the files level, ALL the original
folder AND subfolder date/time stamps are preserved in the destination
drive's partition. That is part and parcel of maintaining an accurate and
complete generational copy.

=====

Incidentally, I just found a copy of the Casper Guide (pdf file) and looked
at it, and, as expected, it doesn't really explain this well. It's a
superficial explanation, at best, which is probably ok for the average Joe,
since all he generally just wants to make a clone of his source disk should
that disk fail, end of story.

But the option in Casper that is more related to what I'm talking about
would have to be the "Copy a Drive" option, which isn't even really
explained in the manual (it's just mentioned).


 




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