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Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 14th 18, 07:26 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
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Posts: 2,906
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

Hi All,

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time? It use to be in
Task Manager, Performance.

Many thanks,
-T
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  #2  
Old June 14th 18, 08:46 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 7,573
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

T wrote:
Hi All,

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time? It use to be in
Task Manager, Performance.

Many thanks,
-T


There's more than one way.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...dows-10-a.html

And mine still seems to be working in 17134.xxx

https://s33.postimg.cc/m3xdj0xwf/uptime.gif

Paul
  #3  
Old June 14th 18, 09:11 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
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Posts: 2,906
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

On 06/14/2018 12:46 PM, Paul wrote:
T wrote:
Hi All,

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time?* It use to be in
Task Manager, Performance.

Many thanks,
-T


There's more than one way.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...dows-10-a.html


And mine still seems to be working in 17134.xxx

https://s33.postimg.cc/m3xdj0xwf/uptime.gif

** Paul


Thank you!

I wonder if this is a home versus pro issue?

  #4  
Old June 14th 18, 09:16 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Andy Burns[_6_]
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Posts: 722
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

T wrote:

Paul wrote:

T wrote:

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time?* It use to be in
Task Manager, Performance.


And mine still seems to be working in 17134.xxx
https://s33.postimg.cc/m3xdj0xwf/uptime.gif


I wonder if this is a home versus pro issue?


No, same place on my 1803 home.
  #5  
Old June 14th 18, 09:43 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
😉 Good Guy 😉
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Posts: 324
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

On 14/06/2018 19:26, T wrote:
Hi All,

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time? It use to be in
Task Manager, Performance.

Many thanks,
-T


You are a rogue trader who should be arrested and locked away for
defrauding seniors and other unsuspecting Windows users.

You don't even know how to ask a question on a public newsgroup. The
language used is that of rogue traders. I wouldn't go near them!!!1


/--- This email has been checked for viruses by
Windows Defender software.
//https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/comprehensive-security/



--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.

  #6  
Old June 14th 18, 09:55 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
VanguardLH[_2_]
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Posts: 9,764
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

T wrote:

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time? It use to be in Task
Manager, Performance.


Alternatively, in a command shell, you could run:

systeminfo.exe | find "Time:"

That doesn't tell you the uptime. That tells you when the current
Windows instance got loaded (System Boot Time). There will probably be
a long delay while it reads the hotfix information (which you don't want
to see just to see uptime).

Another choice is to run:

net statistics (workstartion|server)

Does not matter if you specify stats for workstation or server mode. It
is the first output line you want that says the stats were compiled
"since" the boot timestamp, so you could modify the above command to:

net statistics workstation | find "since"

Systeminfo and net measure from slightly different points in the Windows
load hence they can be off by several seconds depending on how speedy is
the Windows load. Works in Windows 7. Probably still be available in
Windows 10.

If you don't want to do the in-head math to computer the length of time
from the boot time until now, and because you, a tech guy, should
already be familiar with SysInternals' tools, use psinfo to tell you the
uptime, as in:

psinfo | find "Uptime:"

You can use Powershell to get you the uptime by querying the
W32_OperatingSystem WMI class, as in:

Get-WmiObject win32_operatingsystem | select csname, @{LABEL='LastBootUpTime';EXPRESSION={$_.ConverttoD ateTime($_.lastbootuptime)}}

Another PS method is:

Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -Property LastBootUpTime

but the LastBootTime attribute isn't in human readable format. A
problem with querying the WMI property is that is might measure only
from when the OS got started, not from when it got loaded. For example,
I've read the WMI property measures from when the OS came out of SUSPEND
state. That is, the uptime could be from when the OS got loaded or when
it last came out of SUSPEND state. I never suspend or use any power
saving mode for my computer as it would interfere with scheduled tasks,
especially backups (since way too many backup programs want to use their
own scheduler process instead of Task Scheduler). Instead I use a power
plan that merely spins down the HDDs and turns off video to save power
but the computer is still running to remain usable for unattended tasks.
Since I don't suspend my computers, I cannot test if the WMI property
reports time from boot or time from last not-suspended.
  #7  
Old June 14th 18, 10:12 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,906
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

On 06/14/2018 01:55 PM, VanguardLH wrote:
T wrote:

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time? It use to be in Task
Manager, Performance.


Alternatively, in a command shell, you could run:

systeminfo.exe | find "Time:"

That doesn't tell you the uptime. That tells you when the current
Windows instance got loaded (System Boot Time). There will probably be
a long delay while it reads the hotfix information (which you don't want
to see just to see uptime).

Another choice is to run:

net statistics (workstartion|server)

Does not matter if you specify stats for workstation or server mode. It
is the first output line you want that says the stats were compiled
"since" the boot timestamp, so you could modify the above command to:

net statistics workstation | find "since"

Systeminfo and net measure from slightly different points in the Windows
load hence they can be off by several seconds depending on how speedy is
the Windows load. Works in Windows 7. Probably still be available in
Windows 10.

If you don't want to do the in-head math to computer the length of time
from the boot time until now, and because you, a tech guy, should
already be familiar with SysInternals' tools, use psinfo to tell you the
uptime, as in:

psinfo | find "Uptime:"

You can use Powershell to get you the uptime by querying the
W32_OperatingSystem WMI class, as in:

Get-WmiObject win32_operatingsystem | select csname, @{LABEL='LastBootUpTime';EXPRESSION={$_.ConverttoD ateTime($_.lastbootuptime)}}

Another PS method is:

Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -Property LastBootUpTime

but the LastBootTime attribute isn't in human readable format. A
problem with querying the WMI property is that is might measure only
from when the OS got started, not from when it got loaded. For example,
I've read the WMI property measures from when the OS came out of SUSPEND
state. That is, the uptime could be from when the OS got loaded or when
it last came out of SUSPEND state. I never suspend or use any power
saving mode for my computer as it would interfere with scheduled tasks,
especially backups (since way too many backup programs want to use their
own scheduler process instead of Task Scheduler). Instead I use a power
plan that merely spins down the HDDs and turns off video to save power
but the computer is still running to remain usable for unattended tasks.
Since I don't suspend my computers, I cannot test if the WMI property
reports time from boot or time from last not-suspended.


Thank you!
  #8  
Old June 14th 18, 10:13 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,906
Default Where did Where's Waldo put Up Time in 1803?

On 06/14/2018 01:16 PM, Andy Burns wrote:
T wrote:

Paul wrote:

T wrote:

in W10-1803, where did they move Up Time?* It use to be in
Task Manager, Performance.

And mine still seems to be working in 17134.xxx
https://s33.postimg.cc/m3xdj0xwf/uptime.gif


I wonder if this is a home versus pro issue?


No, same place on my 1803 home.


Thank you

Customer never reboot her computer. I set her
backup to reboot at 01:00, so maybe ...

 




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