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Macrium Reflect Question



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 28th 18, 03:27 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
G Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Macrium Reflect Question

My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive
and a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.
--
G Ross
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  #2  
Old December 28th 18, 04:01 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Big Al[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,297
Default Macrium Reflect Question

On 12/28/18 9:27 AM, G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound.* I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive.* My drive is set up as a C: drive and
a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I have
to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.

Clone will dupe the drive.

In the time it took to get your first response, you could have cloned
the drive already and just looked at what it did. "the proof is in the
pudding" logic.




  #3  
Old December 28th 18, 04:17 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Big Al[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,297
Default Macrium Reflect Question

On 12/28/18 10:01 AM, Big Al wrote:
On 12/28/18 9:27 AM, G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound.* I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive.* My drive is set up as a C: drive
and a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.

Clone will dupe the drive.

In the time it took to get your first response, you could have cloned
the drive already and just looked at what it did.** "the proof is in the
pudding" logic.


Sorry, I'm not trying to be nasty, the clone operation will not destroy
any data on your current drive, and obviously you've allocated the 2nd
drive to be erased and cloned, so no harm there. I would have just
cloned it and seen what happened.

When I did my first clone I was moving from an 80G to 100G on an old
laptop. New 100G was expendable obviously and I knew the clone would
not hurt my data. I did it, swapped the drives and found it worked and
never went back. I did it another time later as the 100G was a 7200RPM
and it ran a bit hotter than I wanted.

I was using Acronis by the way and it would resize up or down IIRC.

Al.

  #4  
Old December 28th 18, 04:29 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,197
Default Macrium Reflect Question

Big Al wrote:
On 12/28/18 9:27 AM, G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive
and a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.


Clone will dupe the drive.

In the time it took to get your first response, you could have cloned
the drive already and just looked at what it did. "the proof is in the
pudding" logic.


Yup. Full auto. Rock and roll :-)

No screwing around.

All done for you.

No need for *any* spoon feeding of any kind.

*******

Macrium supports drag and drop of single partitions
from the source "line" on the screen to the destination "line".

In addition, using tick boxen, you can select an entire
line of partitions, and clone over. On OS drives, just
for your own peace of mind, tick all the boxes (including the
MBR box) and bring everything over.

If you clone a 1TB HDD to a 500GB SSD, it helps if
the C: partition is the *last* partition on the 1TB
drive, as you can have the length of the last partition
trimmed to fit automatically. If the "fattest" partition
is in the middle of the disk, it's going to take
more work to get a desired result.

You can drag and drop single partitions, in that case.

If you drag and drop stuff, boot the Macrium emergency boot CD,
then select the "Boot Repair" item from the Macrium CD,
while only the output cloned drive is present. After
boot repair, you shouldn't have a problem getting the
cloned drive to boot.

When you clone an entire drive by tick-box-method, boot
repair is automatically done for you. If you're attempting
to do "Partition Management" by dragging and dropping a single
partition at a time, Macrium cannot "guess" what you're
doing, which is why the manual boot repair from the CD
might be a good idea as your next step.

*******

For simple clones between like-sized drives, just
tick all the boxes and go for it.

Paul
  #5  
Old December 31st 18, 11:14 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
G. Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Macrium Reflect Question

G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive and
a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I have
to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.


Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross


a



  #6  
Old January 1st 19, 03:52 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,197
Default Macrium Reflect Question

G. Ross wrote:
G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive and
a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I have
to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.


Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross


Assuming the feature is still present, see the dialog
box at the bottom of this page.

https://blog.macrium.com/techie-tues...i=a8ebc97e3f0e

"If running chkdsk is unsuccessful, force Macrium Reflect to continue on Error 23.

Select Other tasks Edit defaults Advanced.
Select "Ignore bad sectors".
Click OK.
"

That would be the equivalent (sort of) of using gddrescue.

Note: I do *not* recommend running CHKDSK as a method to
nuke and pave file systems (as the top of that article
suggests). You can experience severe tire damage doing
that. Hundreds of thousands of errors could result.
CHKDSK is a good thing to do on *healthy* hardware and
systems. Don't be kicking *sick* stuff with CHKDSK.
This is generally true of any tool which attempts
"repair in-place" - you could lose your only copy if
damage or total failure is the result.

*Always* try to make a clone first, even if it's a
crappy clone. Make sure you've rescued as many files
as possible. Then, if some subsequent experiments
result in total destruction of the source drive, you
still have (most of) the files.

I would be torturing you with tales about using
Linux "gddrescue" as the way to do this, but try
Macrium with the "Ignore bad sectors", then see
how many files you got. It could be that the disk
is mechanically too sick to get past that point, and
then using gddrescue would end the same way.

(sector by sector copy with a tool for the purpose, under Linux)
https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

(available as the gddrescue package, with ddrescue executable maybe)
(Can be installed from package manager, doesn't need compile)
(rescued.log has a terse format recording success/failure of copy)

# first, grab most of the error-free areas in a hurry:
./ddrescue -n /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log
# then try to recover as much of the dicy areas as possible:
./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

*******

You *can* compare disks afterwards, using hashdeep
and generating checksums for every file. (That
will help tell you what clusters didn't copy.)

But read the Hashdeep manual page thoroughly - you
will need the obscure command line parameters to turn off
checking of "Reparse Points" and "Named Pipes". The
file system is littered with crap that will prevent
a hashdeep checksum run from completing.

Do your hashdeep on the "dest" disk first, and perfect
your technique of generating a manifest on the working
disk. You don't want to tune up your hashdeep skill
set on the sick disk - it might take too many runs
until you figure out how to use it well.

And if I knew of a better option than hashdeep, I'd
be selling that. Hashdeep is useful, but it's not
as friendly as it could be.

Good luck with your sick disk,

Paul
  #7  
Old January 1st 19, 12:53 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,309
Default Macrium Reflect Question

In message , G. Ross
writes:
[]
Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross

See Paul's reply for if it is failing to read files because there's
something wrong with the disc. If it's just failing because it's trying
to read files that Windows is using, then don't try running it from
within Windows anyway, but boot the system into Macrium from the Macrium
CD, which you have made, haven't you ... (-:

a

b?


--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, VO5 (I came, I saw, I washed my hair) - Mik from S+AS Limited
), 1998
  #8  
Old January 1st 19, 01:28 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,197
Default Macrium Reflect Question

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , G. Ross
writes:
[]
Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross

See Paul's reply for if it is failing to read files because there's
something wrong with the disc. If it's just failing because it's trying
to read files that Windows is using, then don't try running it from
within Windows anyway, but boot the system into Macrium from the Macrium
CD, which you have made, haven't you ... (-:


By using VSS shadow copy, it should be able to copy
anything on the hard drive. That's the default method.

It's possible if you were doing something to files during
the quiescence period (the ten seconds during which a VSS
shadow copy is prepared), you have the possibility of
capturing the old version of a file or the new version
of the file. You'll still capture something.

Any files created after a VSS snapshot is taken, are written to
disk, but are not backed up by Macrium. They will be picked up
in the next backup however. Just as a file created a day
from now, would be picked up in a backup made a week from now.

If there is a known subsystem that cannot be quiesced, there should
be a VSS failure message indicating no provider is available.
For example, if your desktop machine was running a Microsoft Exchange
server, I wouldn't expect that to end well. There are some items
that need more research, when it comes to configuring backups
for them.

For desktops, this is normally pretty easy and there are enough
provider types to handle everything for you.

And there's no difference between cloning and imaging. They
can both use VSS.

If VSS is unavailable (you trashed it on purpose), the backup
software will try to use PSS (PS Snap), but any busy files
are likely to cause a problem. PSS would be acceptable for
non-OS drive copies, as an example (where the files are normally
"not busy").

If there's a good reason for a copy to not be possible,
an error message should indicate as much. If something
just stops dead or rails, suspect hardware.

And when problems like this arise, it's not a time for a lot
of experiments. If the cloning tool has an option to "ignore
bad sectors", that's about as good as gddrescue, and may be
quicker to implement. If the cloning still fails, now
you're taking a risk by booting your Linux OS drive and
running gddrescue from there. I had a case once, where turning
off the power, meant the hard drive did not start on the
next power cycle, and 40GB of data was gone. That's how suddenly
it can happen with known badass disk drives (Maxtor 40GB). I
tried to leave the power up as long as I could, took the chance,
and lost. The drive could no longer be seen in the BIOS
or the OS. There were no burn marks or visible
symptoms (some failures back then, there was a burn
mark on the motor controller IC).

In 2018, we can use a USB stick with Linux on it, so
the power doesn't have to be cycled. If the drive is
SATA, there's no hardware RESET signal, so the SATA drive
will be unpreturbed by your OS change. If the drive is
IDE ribbon cable type, the cable has a RESET signal,
and during RESET, the Service Area is reloaded and
the CPU on the disk drive reboots. And in that case,
you're taking as much risk with the IDE drive as you
would by power cycling it. SATA is a little better, in
that you can change OSes, without the drive spinning
down.

Paul
  #9  
Old January 1st 19, 04:56 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,309
Default Macrium Reflect Question

In message , Paul
writes:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , G. Ross
writes:
[]
Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error
Read Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I
disabled firewall, had already turned off any running programs.
Turned off windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It
still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross

See Paul's reply for if it is failing to read files because there's
something wrong with the disc. If it's just failing because it's
trying to read files that Windows is using, then don't try running it
from within Windows anyway, but boot the system into Macrium from the
Macrium CD, which you have made, haven't you ... (-:


By using VSS shadow copy, it should be able to copy
anything on the hard drive. That's the default method.


[rest of good stuff - VSS, PSS - snipped.]

I tend to forget about VSS etc., because I always make my Macrium images
having booted from the Macrium CD, in which situation VSS _isn't_ of
course the default method. I also use this - and apologies to readers
who are fed up of me doing this - as a reminder to people to make the
damn CD! (In the past - though not so much recently - I got fed up of
seeing, for example, comparisons of all sorts of backup/image/whatever
softwares, where little or no mention was _made_ of the necessity to
make the software's bootable CD. Whatever the software in question -
Macrium, Acronis, EaseUS, others, even Microsoft's own built-in.)

Of course, if G. Ross is _only_ cloning, rather than making an image,
s/he could indeed proceed without ever using a Macrium boot CD.
Personally, I'd use the occasion where I was about to clone - whether
due to a failing drive, or just because I was fitting a bigger drive (or
an SSD) - as an opportunity to make an image anyway, but that does
(almost) imply you have a third drive on which to put the image, which
some people won't have.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I'm a self-made man, thereby demonstrating once again the perils of unskilled
labor..." - Harlan Ellison
  #10  
Old January 2nd 19, 02:01 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
G Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Macrium Reflect Question

Paul wrote:
G. Ross wrote:
G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive and
a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I have
to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.


Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross


Assuming the feature is still present, see the dialog
box at the bottom of this page.

https://blog.macrium.com/techie-tues...i=a8ebc97e3f0e

"If running chkdsk is unsuccessful, force Macrium Reflect to continue on Error 23.

Select Other tasks Edit defaults Advanced.
Select "Ignore bad sectors".
Click OK.
"

That would be the equivalent (sort of) of using gddrescue.

Note: I do *not* recommend running CHKDSK as a method to
nuke and pave file systems (as the top of that article
suggests). You can experience severe tire damage doing
that. Hundreds of thousands of errors could result.
CHKDSK is a good thing to do on *healthy* hardware and
systems. Don't be kicking *sick* stuff with CHKDSK.
This is generally true of any tool which attempts
"repair in-place" - you could lose your only copy if
damage or total failure is the result.

*Always* try to make a clone first, even if it's a
crappy clone. Make sure you've rescued as many files
as possible. Then, if some subsequent experiments
result in total destruction of the source drive, you
still have (most of) the files.

I would be torturing you with tales about using
Linux "gddrescue" as the way to do this, but try
Macrium with the "Ignore bad sectors", then see
how many files you got. It could be that the disk
is mechanically too sick to get past that point, and
then using gddrescue would end the same way.

(sector by sector copy with a tool for the purpose, under Linux)
https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

(available as the gddrescue package, with ddrescue executable maybe)
(Can be installed from package manager, doesn't need compile)
(rescued.log has a terse format recording success/failure of copy)

# first, grab most of the error-free areas in a hurry:
./ddrescue -n /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log
# then try to recover as much of the dicy areas as possible:
./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

*******

You *can* compare disks afterwards, using hashdeep
and generating checksums for every file. (That
will help tell you what clusters didn't copy.)

But read the Hashdeep manual page thoroughly - you
will need the obscure command line parameters to turn off
checking of "Reparse Points" and "Named Pipes". The
file system is littered with crap that will prevent
a hashdeep checksum run from completing.

Do your hashdeep on the "dest" disk first, and perfect
your technique of generating a manifest on the working
disk. You don't want to tune up your hashdeep skill
set on the sick disk - it might take too many runs
until you figure out how to use it well.

And if I knew of a better option than hashdeep, I'd
be selling that. Hashdeep is useful, but it's not
as friendly as it could be.

Good luck with your sick disk,

Paul

When I tried using the Macrium disk, it got to the same place and the
error message sounded like a plumbing problem--"Read Failed--Broken
Pipe" whatever that means.

Update: I have the disk, but it does not have the option to ignore
bad sectors, so I used the one on my computer and set that option. No
luck. This time it said "clone failed--read failed--no such file or
directory".

Guess I'll have to reload Acronis and try that. I had stopped using
that because it puts things on the computer that are nearly impossible
to remove.

Thanks for all the hand-holding.

I also have a macrium Boot disk I made which loads Linux. Have never
used it and am not familiar with Linux so did not try it.

--
G Ross
  #11  
Old January 2nd 19, 06:38 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,197
Default Macrium Reflect Question

G Ross wrote:
Paul wrote:
G. Ross wrote:
G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive and
a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have
to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.

Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross


Assuming the feature is still present, see the dialog
box at the bottom of this page.

https://blog.macrium.com/techie-tues...i=a8ebc97e3f0e


"If running chkdsk is unsuccessful, force Macrium Reflect to
continue on Error 23.

Select Other tasks Edit defaults Advanced.
Select "Ignore bad sectors".
Click OK.
"

That would be the equivalent (sort of) of using gddrescue.

Note: I do *not* recommend running CHKDSK as a method to
nuke and pave file systems (as the top of that article
suggests). You can experience severe tire damage doing
that. Hundreds of thousands of errors could result.
CHKDSK is a good thing to do on *healthy* hardware and
systems. Don't be kicking *sick* stuff with CHKDSK.
This is generally true of any tool which attempts
"repair in-place" - you could lose your only copy if
damage or total failure is the result.

*Always* try to make a clone first, even if it's a
crappy clone. Make sure you've rescued as many files
as possible. Then, if some subsequent experiments
result in total destruction of the source drive, you
still have (most of) the files.

I would be torturing you with tales about using
Linux "gddrescue" as the way to do this, but try
Macrium with the "Ignore bad sectors", then see
how many files you got. It could be that the disk
is mechanically too sick to get past that point, and
then using gddrescue would end the same way.

(sector by sector copy with a tool for the purpose, under Linux)
https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

(available as the gddrescue package, with ddrescue executable maybe)
(Can be installed from package manager, doesn't need compile)
(rescued.log has a terse format recording success/failure of copy)

# first, grab most of the error-free areas in a hurry:
./ddrescue -n /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log
# then try to recover as much of the dicy areas as possible:
./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

*******

You *can* compare disks afterwards, using hashdeep
and generating checksums for every file. (That
will help tell you what clusters didn't copy.)

But read the Hashdeep manual page thoroughly - you
will need the obscure command line parameters to turn off
checking of "Reparse Points" and "Named Pipes". The
file system is littered with crap that will prevent
a hashdeep checksum run from completing.

Do your hashdeep on the "dest" disk first, and perfect
your technique of generating a manifest on the working
disk. You don't want to tune up your hashdeep skill
set on the sick disk - it might take too many runs
until you figure out how to use it well.

And if I knew of a better option than hashdeep, I'd
be selling that. Hashdeep is useful, but it's not
as friendly as it could be.

Good luck with your sick disk,

Paul

When I tried using the Macrium disk, it got to the same place and the
error message sounded like a plumbing problem--"Read Failed--Broken
Pipe" whatever that means.

Update: I have the disk, but it does not have the option to ignore bad
sectors, so I used the one on my computer and set that option. No
luck. This time it said "clone failed--read failed--no such file or
directory".

Guess I'll have to reload Acronis and try that. I had stopped using
that because it puts things on the computer that are nearly impossible
to remove.

Thanks for all the hand-holding.

I also have a macrium Boot disk I made which loads Linux. Have never
used it and am not familiar with Linux so did not try it.


So you're using an older version of Macrium then. Which
should still have worked.

The oldest Macrium had a Linux emergency boot disc which
is used during restores to a new hard drive.

Later versions (starting in Ver.5?) use a WinPE based disc,
the same "OS" as runs on a Windows installer DVD. When you
prepare one of those, it takes 500MB of downloads for the
"kit" from Microsoft, that Macrium uses that to make the boot
materials (normally about 300MB worth to a CD).

The most recent "useful to me" version is Macrium version 6,
as version 7 removed the MRIMG to VHD converter.

You'll need to make a new emergency boot CD when this
is installed, but for the purposes of an emergency clone
done via the running OS, no additional downloads would be needed.
It's backup/restore that benefits from a new CD. Or if you
really really wanted to do the clone offline, you could make
the new CD and try it. Cloning should really work "hot" and
that's the way I always do it. Cloning via the CD is reserved
for those cases when the wind is blowing the wrong way.

http://updates.macrium.com/reflect/v...ls6.3.1852.htm

http://updates.macrium.com/reflect/v6/ReflectDLv6.exe === stub installer

gives downloader 6.0.553.0, select a 32 bit or 64 bit version,
plus WinPE5 or WinPE10 to make emergency boot CDs.

v6.3.1849_reflect_setup_free_x86.exe 44,303,520 bytes === size estimates

v6.3.1849_reflect_setup_free_x64.exe 46,645,904 bytes === size estimates

It really shouldn't work any better, whether you get
1849 or 1852, but you can try it if you want.

For my purposes, that's as far as I'd go on version,
as I really liked the MRIMG to VHD capability (allows
doing P2V and bringing physical disks into virtual
environments).

*******

As you would expect, a pipe is a connection between two
computer processes, and has a limited size buffer between
the two things. A broken pipe implies one of the parties
died. Normally, you would expect if each party was
being monitored, a semi-intelligent error message
would result (the dying party perhaps generating a log).

Macrium does keep a log file, if you can find it.

Note that Windows 10 has some pretty bizarre file system
extensions, whereas Windows 7 is still reasonably good.
I don't think this is some "structure" that's caused
indigestion, as the indigestion should happen during
partition analysis, rather than right in the middle
of a cluster copy operation. Macrium tries to do things
sequentially, first doing a sweep to compute what
clusters need to be copied, and then copying the
clusters in order like 1,4,7,23. Unused portions
of the disk don't need to be copied - except for
cases where you were expecting an "undelete" program
to recover data at some later date. Not copying
white space means undelete won't work on the clone
(normally, not a big deal).

HTH,
Paul
  #12  
Old January 2nd 19, 01:26 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
G Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Macrium Reflect Question

Paul wrote:
G Ross wrote:
Paul wrote:
G. Ross wrote:
G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive and
a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have
to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.

Got it hooked up and it works fine for 30% then stops with error Read
Failed. Said was blocked from reading files in root. I disabled
firewall, had already turned off any running programs. Turned off
windows defender and windows firewall and antivirus. It still stalls
at 30%.
What else should I do?

G.Ross

Assuming the feature is still present, see the dialog
box at the bottom of this page.

https://blog.macrium.com/techie-tues...i=a8ebc97e3f0e


"If running chkdsk is unsuccessful, force Macrium Reflect to
continue on Error 23.

Select Other tasks Edit defaults Advanced.
Select "Ignore bad sectors".
Click OK.
"

That would be the equivalent (sort of) of using gddrescue.

Note: I do *not* recommend running CHKDSK as a method to
nuke and pave file systems (as the top of that article
suggests). You can experience severe tire damage doing
that. Hundreds of thousands of errors could result.
CHKDSK is a good thing to do on *healthy* hardware and
systems. Don't be kicking *sick* stuff with CHKDSK.
This is generally true of any tool which attempts
"repair in-place" - you could lose your only copy if
damage or total failure is the result.

*Always* try to make a clone first, even if it's a
crappy clone. Make sure you've rescued as many files
as possible. Then, if some subsequent experiments
result in total destruction of the source drive, you
still have (most of) the files.

I would be torturing you with tales about using
Linux "gddrescue" as the way to do this, but try
Macrium with the "Ignore bad sectors", then see
how many files you got. It could be that the disk
is mechanically too sick to get past that point, and
then using gddrescue would end the same way.

(sector by sector copy with a tool for the purpose, under Linux)
https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

(available as the gddrescue package, with ddrescue executable maybe)
(Can be installed from package manager, doesn't need compile)
(rescued.log has a terse format recording success/failure of copy)

# first, grab most of the error-free areas in a hurry:
./ddrescue -n /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log
# then try to recover as much of the dicy areas as possible:
./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

*******

You *can* compare disks afterwards, using hashdeep
and generating checksums for every file. (That
will help tell you what clusters didn't copy.)

But read the Hashdeep manual page thoroughly - you
will need the obscure command line parameters to turn off
checking of "Reparse Points" and "Named Pipes". The
file system is littered with crap that will prevent
a hashdeep checksum run from completing.

Do your hashdeep on the "dest" disk first, and perfect
your technique of generating a manifest on the working
disk. You don't want to tune up your hashdeep skill
set on the sick disk - it might take too many runs
until you figure out how to use it well.

And if I knew of a better option than hashdeep, I'd
be selling that. Hashdeep is useful, but it's not
as friendly as it could be.

Good luck with your sick disk,

Paul

When I tried using the Macrium disk, it got to the same place and the
error message sounded like a plumbing problem--"Read Failed--Broken
Pipe" whatever that means.

Update: I have the disk, but it does not have the option to ignore bad
sectors, so I used the one on my computer and set that option. No
luck. This time it said "clone failed--read failed--no such file or
directory".

Guess I'll have to reload Acronis and try that. I had stopped using
that because it puts things on the computer that are nearly impossible
to remove.

Thanks for all the hand-holding.

I also have a macrium Boot disk I made which loads Linux. Have never
used it and am not familiar with Linux so did not try it.


So you're using an older version of Macrium then. Which
should still have worked.

The oldest Macrium had a Linux emergency boot disc which
is used during restores to a new hard drive.

Later versions (starting in Ver.5?) use a WinPE based disc,
the same "OS" as runs on a Windows installer DVD. When you
prepare one of those, it takes 500MB of downloads for the
"kit" from Microsoft, that Macrium uses that to make the boot
materials (normally about 300MB worth to a CD).

The most recent "useful to me" version is Macrium version 6,
as version 7 removed the MRIMG to VHD converter.

You'll need to make a new emergency boot CD when this
is installed, but for the purposes of an emergency clone
done via the running OS, no additional downloads would be needed.
It's backup/restore that benefits from a new CD. Or if you
really really wanted to do the clone offline, you could make
the new CD and try it. Cloning should really work "hot" and
that's the way I always do it. Cloning via the CD is reserved
for those cases when the wind is blowing the wrong way.

http://updates.macrium.com/reflect/v...ls6.3.1852.htm

http://updates.macrium.com/reflect/v6/ReflectDLv6.exe === stub installer

gives downloader 6.0.553.0, select a 32 bit or 64 bit version,
plus WinPE5 or WinPE10 to make emergency boot CDs.

v6.3.1849_reflect_setup_free_x86.exe 44,303,520 bytes === size estimates

v6.3.1849_reflect_setup_free_x64.exe 46,645,904 bytes === size estimates

It really shouldn't work any better, whether you get
1849 or 1852, but you can try it if you want.

For my purposes, that's as far as I'd go on version,
as I really liked the MRIMG to VHD capability (allows
doing P2V and bringing physical disks into virtual
environments).

*******

As you would expect, a pipe is a connection between two
computer processes, and has a limited size buffer between
the two things. A broken pipe implies one of the parties
died. Normally, you would expect if each party was
being monitored, a semi-intelligent error message
would result (the dying party perhaps generating a log).

Macrium does keep a log file, if you can find it.

Note that Windows 10 has some pretty bizarre file system
extensions, whereas Windows 7 is still reasonably good.
I don't think this is some "structure" that's caused
indigestion, as the indigestion should happen during
partition analysis, rather than right in the middle
of a cluster copy operation. Macrium tries to do things
sequentially, first doing a sweep to compute what
clusters need to be copied, and then copying the
clusters in order like 1,4,7,23. Unused portions
of the disk don't need to be copied - except for
cases where you were expecting an "undelete" program
to recover data at some later date. Not copying
white space means undelete won't work on the clone
(normally, not a big deal).

HTH,
Paul

I am using (or trying to use) v 6.3.1855

--
G Ross
  #13  
Old January 2nd 19, 02:35 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,197
Default Macrium Reflect Question

G Ross wrote:


I am using (or trying to use) v 6.3.1855


OK, a search shows this solution.

https://support.macrium.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=5459

OS based image - failed, broken pipe
OS based clone - failed, broken pipe
CD based clone - failed, broken pipe
CD based image - works (but who knows how well) , enable ignore errors

By using the CD, you can convert your drive to an MRIMG.

After the MRIMG completes, you then restore it to
the second hard drive.

This will require storage for the MRIMG, plus
the new drive you are copying to, for the restoration.
A total of two disks, or one disk via File Sharing,
plus your second disk for the actual restore.

To be honest with you, I would be quite surprised if this works.
It's unlikely that just one software situation works properly
and the others don't. Doesn't make sense. Two out of four
combos should work.

*******

If this doesn't work, it would be time to use a competing backup
software, or use gddrescue from a Linux LiveCD.

If I had the proper "broken" drive to test this, I would
have tried it by now. I have dead drives, but they no longer
respond, so I can't use those for test. And the "spongy" hard
drives are still CRC error free, so I can't use those either.
It takes "just the right conditions" to reproduce your
problem, and I have no simulator here for it (when doing
fault simulation, you can use things such as error simulators
to test that software works properly).

Paul
  #14  
Old January 3rd 19, 04:10 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
G Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Macrium Reflect Question

G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive
and a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.

Re-installed Acronis. It would not clone the disk either on automatic
or manual. No explanation, just said "Clone Failed".
So I will just use the same setup until the disk dies, Put in the new
disk, set up windows from my original (unused) windows disk and go
from there.
Thanks again for all the help and suggestions.

--
G Ross
  #15  
Old January 3rd 19, 04:34 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,197
Default Macrium Reflect Question

G Ross wrote:
G Ross wrote:
My hard disk occasionally emits a squealing sound. I want to clone it
to a same size, same brand drive. My drive is set up as a C: drive
and a D: Drive.
Question: Will Macrium set on clone set up the two drives or will I
have to format and set them up myself before cloning?
Thanks in advance.

Re-installed Acronis. It would not clone the disk either on automatic
or manual. No explanation, just said "Clone Failed".
So I will just use the same setup until the disk dies, Put in the new
disk, set up windows from my original (unused) windows disk and go from
there.
Thanks again for all the help and suggestions.


There's gddrescue if you want it.

Paul
 




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