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Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 16th 18, 07:33 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network, I want
complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders, and files
on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there that can do this
automatically? (And please, I don't want to rehash the potential security
issues with this approach). I just want a simple utility program, and would
prefer not to to have to go through all the command line stuff like TAKEOWN,
ICACLS, etc, etc. And I want to do this for the entire C: partition. And
yes, I am aware of the security risks.


Ads
  #2  
Old September 16th 18, 07:58 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,970
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

In message , Bill in Co
writes:
OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network, I want
complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders, and files
on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there that can do this
automatically? (And please, I don't want to rehash the potential security
issues with this approach). I just want a simple utility program, and would
prefer not to to have to go through all the command line stuff like TAKEOWN,
ICACLS, etc, etc. And I want to do this for the entire C: partition. And
yes, I am aware of the security risks.


I don't know about the others, but Take Ownership can be inserted into
the right-click menu (for both folders and files), rather than having to
use the command line; I forget how I did it, but I'm sure someone will
say.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

She's showing her age a little bit. I always say she doesn't have teething
troubles, she has denture troubles! - Timothy West (on their narrowboat!), RT
2014-March
  #3  
Old September 16th 18, 01:30 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
SC Tom[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,986
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)



"Bill in Co" wrote in message
...
OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network, I want
complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders, and
files on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there that can
do this automatically? (And please, I don't want to rehash the potential
security issues with this approach). I just want a simple utility
program, and would prefer not to to have to go through all the command
line stuff like TAKEOWN, ICACLS, etc, etc. And I want to do this for the
entire C: partition. And yes, I am aware of the security risks.


Here's the "Take Ownership" reg file that John mentioned. I haven't tried it
on the whole C: drive, but it works well for the large number of files I've
used it on:

==============================

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\takeownership\command]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\takeownership\comm and]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\takeownership\comm and]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\takeownership\co mmand]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F /t"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\"
/grant administrators:F /t"

==========================================

Watch word wrap on the longer lines.
--

SC Tom


  #4  
Old September 16th 18, 01:55 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,078
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership,permissions, etc)

SC Tom wrote:


"Bill in Co" wrote in message
...
OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network, I
want complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders,
and files on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there
that can do this automatically? (And please, I don't want to rehash
the potential security issues with this approach). I just want a
simple utility program, and would prefer not to to have to go through
all the command line stuff like TAKEOWN, ICACLS, etc, etc. And I
want to do this for the entire C: partition. And yes, I am aware of
the security risks.


Here's the "Take Ownership" reg file that John mentioned. I haven't
tried it on the whole C: drive, but it works well for the large number
of files I've used it on:

==============================

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\takeownership\command]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\takeownership\comm and]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\dllfile\shell\takeownership\comm and]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant administrators:F"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\takeownership]
@="Take ownership"
"HasLUAShield"=""
"NoWorkingDirectory"=""

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\takeownership\co mmand]
@="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\" /grant
administrators:F /t"
"IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\"
/grant administrators:F /t"

==========================================

Watch word wrap on the longer lines.


Being a .reg file, you save the text with that file extension
and then right-click the file and select "Merge" from the menu.

https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...-shortcut.html

Paul

  #5  
Old September 16th 18, 02:22 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,767
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

"Bill in Co" wrote

| And I want to do this for the entire C: partition. And
| yes, I am aware of the security risks.
|

I gave you a link. I don't remember how that
worked out. I've used it myself to remove
restrictions from all C files and even was able
to delete from winsxs with abandon.

Aside from that, why not just set up the
Administrator account and be that user?
Also, as I mentioned before, you can create
FAT32 data partitions where file restrictions
can't work. Anything copied/moved to FAT32
will be stripped of leg irons.


  #6  
Old September 16th 18, 02:41 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 280
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership,permissions, etc)

On 16/09/2018 07:33, Bill in Co wrote:

OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network


You must be on a network, otherwise how are you posting here?

I want
complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders, and files
on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there that can do this
automatically?


Not both C: and registry, AFAIK.

I just want a simple utility program, and would
prefer not to to have to go through all the command line stuff like TAKEOWN,
ICACLS, etc, etc. And I want to do this for the entire C: partition.


As I previously explained, you can use TAKEOWN and ICACLS to give the
Administrators group both Ownership and Full Control to the entire C:
drive, and you should only have to do it once. The important thing is
to *add* Full Control for the Administrators group, leaving the
*existing* permissions of other users unchanged. The problem is that
the GUI method of doing this - rt-click C:, Properties, Security,
etc - *replaces* existing permissions throughout the sub-heirarchy,
and that breaks things, which is why you should only use it for
non-system non-vital subdirectories.

To do the same for the Registry, you or A N Other would have to write a
script, probably VBScript or JavaScript.
  #7  
Old September 16th 18, 02:54 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 280
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership,permissions, etc)

On 16/09/2018 14:41, Java Jive wrote:

To do the same for the Registry, you or A N Other would have to write a
script, probably VBScript or JavaScript.


Or rather, these days it would be PowerShell ...

https://powertoe.wordpress.com/2010/...th-powershell/
  #8  
Old September 16th 18, 03:34 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,078
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership,permissions, etc)

Mayayana wrote:
"Bill in Co" wrote

| And I want to do this for the entire C: partition. And
| yes, I am aware of the security risks.
|

I gave you a link. I don't remember how that
worked out. I've used it myself to remove
restrictions from all C files and even was able
to delete from winsxs with abandon.

Aside from that, why not just set up the
Administrator account and be that user?
Also, as I mentioned before, you can create
FAT32 data partitions where file restrictions
can't work. Anything copied/moved to FAT32
will be stripped of leg irons.


There isn't a one to one mapping, going from NTFS
to FAT32. There are "details" you've skipped over.
This is why no partition management company can
blithely offer this capability, of making NTFS
into FAT32. Whereas the other direction is "OK".

Yes, it's true that you can "selectively" pave
over patches of your file system with TakeOwn or
similar. But there are also parts that
"resist being touched".

The OP wants to "pave everything in sight", and that's
just not practical. If you're willing to "win small battles"
but "never win the war", you can.

Would the OP be happy later, if he cannot get into
System Volume Information ? I'm sure his blood pressure
would go through the roof. But once inside that
folder, there are files in there which if touched,
could destroy the file system (they're not really files).
Is it worth the risk to go in there ? Well, you decide
(keep backups!!!).

*******

What's really amazing, in the history of Windows,
is WinXP being installable on either NTFS or FAT32.
And the OS is "feature complete" in both cases.
Including a working implementation of Volume Shadow Service,
even though FAT32 cannot represent files larger than
4GB in size. If I run Macrium on WinXP, it seems to have
no problem using VSS to back up a 72GB C: FAT32 partition.
The one shortcoming in WinXP, is shadows are not persistent
across reboots. And I don't know if this is related
to the NTFS/FAT32 differences or not.

The handling of System Volume Information on Windows 7,
is "definitely different". There's no comparison between
the WinXP contents and the Windows 7 contents there. But
I've not really had any interest in going spelunking there
(since the accident).

In WinXP, it's easy to go looking in there. In Windows 7, not
so much. I *destroyed* a C: volume by looking in SVI
on a Windows C: . A recent attempt to reproduce the failure,
no failure resulted. This is why, if you're going to be
an "atom smasher", better have backups. The morning
that happened to me, I'd made a backup only two hours
earlier, purely on a lark (the backup wasn't planned,
and I had no idea I was going looking in SVI that day).
It was sheer coincidence I had something to restore with.
CHKDSK couldn't fix whatever happened to the file system.
It was trashed (which sure smells to me like a VSS related issue).
VSS records file system deltas, which is why there could
be "severe tire damage" if you futz with one of those
that happens to be persistent (i.e. you touched it
while the OS was offline). I wasn't *writing* the
shadows, only *reading* them.

Windows 7 isn't designed to work on FAT32, so right
away, I could see VSS based backup programs, having
to fall back to PSSNAP, then telling you the pagefile
is open and the backup must stop now. It's fun to
pretend Win7 could run on FAT32, but unless provision
was made in the same way as on WinXP, it's just not
going to happen. And the Junction/Reparse practical
usage on Vista+, lays extra mines in the minefield
for you to trip on. Nobody really minds "tripping"
on a Junction point when they run into one, and
utilities vary on how "elegantly" they step
over the mines. Robocopy makes it a user responsibility,
to know they need to switch on the "step over" function.

If you used Robocopy to copy Win7 C: to a Win7 D: and
62 junction points were missing (because they were
stepped over), how happy will Win7 be on an attempt to
boot from the Win7 D: you made ? My guess is, not very
happy. It should crash just as the desktop tries to start.

Doing a complete paving job in a case like this,
involves filling a lot of tiny potholes along the way.
It's not "one command, for the win".

Paul
  #9  
Old September 16th 18, 11:08 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,767
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

"Paul" wrote

| There isn't a one to one mapping, going from NTFS
| to FAT32. There are "details" you've skipped over.
| This is why no partition management company can
| blithely offer this capability, of making NTFS
| into FAT32. Whereas the other direction is "OK".
|
I didn't mean converting to FAT32. We had a similar
discussion recently. some people think it's nuts, but I
like to use FAT32 data partitions with Win7+ or
Linux, rather than wrestle with file restrictions I
have no use for. So I'm not saying convert to FAT32.
I'm just saying have storage area that's FAT32.


  #10  
Old September 16th 18, 11:38 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 280
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership,permissions, etc)

On 16/09/2018 23:08, Mayayana wrote:

some people think it's nuts,


It is. This is really, really bad advice, and I'm going to ram it back
down your throat every time you give it.

but I
like to use FAT32 data partitions with Win7+ or
Linux, rather than wrestle with file restrictions I
have no use for. So I'm not saying convert to FAT32.
I'm just saying have storage area that's FAT32.


Given a choice between creating an NTFS or a FAT32 data partition, FAT32
offers NOTHING that NTFS does not ...

NTFS + Audit trail so that, if there's a power outage, the system has
maximum chance of autorecovering

FAT32 - You sure as hell better remember to run CHKDSK after a power
outage, otherwise your chances of recovery, already uncertain, are
significantly further reduced.

NTFS + Security which, on a data partition, YOU can specify to suit your
needs.

FAT32 - No security at all, any fool can hack it.

And so on. Quit giving this **** advice.
  #11  
Old September 16th 18, 11:48 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

Mayayana wrote:
"Paul" wrote

There isn't a one to one mapping, going from NTFS
to FAT32. There are "details" you've skipped over.
This is why no partition management company can
blithely offer this capability, of making NTFS
into FAT32. Whereas the other direction is "OK".

I didn't mean converting to FAT32. We had a similar
discussion recently. some people think it's nuts, but I
like to use FAT32 data partitions with Win7+ or
Linux, rather than wrestle with file restrictions I
have no use for. So I'm not saying convert to FAT32.
I'm just saying have storage area that's FAT32.


For the data partitions I don't see any advantage to using FAT32, as I
haven't run into any ownership or permissions issues with the "data". So
the problem is not with the "data", but with the system files and folders
access, the stuff residing on the C: partition. And, of course, the
registry.


  #12  
Old September 17th 18, 12:42 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

Bill in Co wrote:
OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network, I want
complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders, and
files on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there that can
do this automatically? (And please, I don't want to rehash the potential
security issues with this approach). I just want a simple utility
program, and would prefer not to to have to go through all the command
line stuff like TAKEOWN, ICACLS, etc, etc. And I want to do this for
the entire C: partition. And yes, I am aware of the security risks.


Thanks for all the comments and helpful suggestions. In addition to those,
and in case anybody else is interested, I did find some utilities that will
directly accomplish these tasks rather easily, which I've listed below:

For Folder and File Ownership: (adds a right mouse shortcut)

https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...-shortcut.html

For Registry Key Ownership:

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...-registry-keys

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...ry-keys-easily


  #13  
Old September 17th 18, 02:52 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,767
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

"Bill in Co" wrote

| and in case anybody else is interested, I did find some utilities that
will
| directly accomplish these tasks rather easily, which I've listed below:
|
| For Folder and File Ownership: (adds a right mouse shortcut)
|
| https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...-shortcut.html
|
| For Registry Key Ownership:
|
|
https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...-registry-keys
|
|
https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...ry-keys-easily
|

Those seem to be single item approaches, which is
what you said you didn't want. They also limit you
in terms of what you can change, restricting changes
in Program Files, System, etc.

I gave you a link last week. You said it didn't work.
Did you actually try it? If you're wary of 3rd-party
software then try it on a test box first. On the other
hand, what you're linking to is unknown 3rd-party
software.

-------------------------------------------

NT6 Restriction Fix
www.jsware.net/jsware/nt6fix.php5

I just tested it myself to confirm that it works OK:

Boot Win7-64 SP1 as fake admin. (That is, any
Administrator account other than the one with
username "Administrator".)

- Right-click FixNT6.exe and click "Run as Administrator".

- Enter path of C:\Program Files\Windows Media Player
- Check box for recursive restriction removal.
- Select Administrators.
- Click "Set Free" button.

WMP files all now have the same permissions as
before except that Administrators have full control.

Delete WMP folder. Reboot. Still no WMP folder.
Yippee!

I then did the same with C:\Windows\Branding.
Successfully deleted. You could do all of Program
Files if you wanted to, but that's not a great idea.
Why reduce security for things like IE when you
have no need to replace the EXE anyway?

Important notes:

* FixNT6.exe needs to be run elevated as a fake admin.

* Freeing things for all users can often be done by
first freeing them for all admins, but it's not dependable
and it's not advisable. It's assumed that you're normally
running as a fake admin. If you run as a common user
it would make no sense to remove restrictions.

* Freeing Registry keys is almost exactly the same
operation, but I didn't include it because it's undependable
unless you create the key yourself. Since the restrictions
are in HKLM\Software\ and those rarely need to be changed,
I left that function out of NT6Fix. If you really want to
free up masses of those keys then your other links might
be useful.

* I wrote NT6Fix for myself when I first started dealing
with Vista/7 and trying to figure out what could be done
to salvage them. The whole point is exactly what you
were asking for: A very simple method to recursively
remove restrictions on large areas of C:\.

Still, I'd think twice before doing too much. If you
free up something like C:\Windows\System32\, what
value is that going to be to you? On the other hand,
it would allow malware to do things like replace system
libraries. That's not a likely risk, but protection is
still protection. If you wanted to do something like
delete the Windows Update files (which I do on XP)
then it would make more sense to just free those
specific files.
But Win7 is very brittle. Any deleting of system files
should be done on an experimental basis where possibly
losing the whole system is not a problem.

For anyone who's curious, the basic code for FixNT6
is here, as a VB6 project:

www.jsware.net/jsware/vbcode.php5#perms2

That webpage explains the basics. The download
also has an extensive readme file and the code
includes commments.

The gist of it is that of numerous, convoluted
methods MS have cooked up to adjust permissions,
the method I used was the simplest one I could
find and works dependably. It uses the standard
Windows API functions to go through several steps:

* Apply for permission to change ownership.
* Take ownership.
* Change permissions.
* Give back permission to change ownership.

It's a bizarre system. You have full control to
"own" an item but must jump through hoops to
do it. Once you officially own the item you can
change permissions. It's sort of like having
a wacky robot guarding your house who recognizes
you but won't shut itsellf off until you "step into the
magic circle" and sing "Over the Rainbow". But
once you do that, the robot recognizes your
authority over it and you have free run of the
house!


  #14  
Old September 17th 18, 06:30 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
mike[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,046
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership,permissions, etc)

On 9/16/2018 4:42 PM, Bill in Co wrote:
Bill in Co wrote:
OK, I've about reached my limit with Windows 7 and its rules and
regulations. Since I am the only user and I am not on a network, I want
complete and unfettered access to all registry settings, folders, and
files on MY computer. Isn't there any utility program out there that can
do this automatically? (And please, I don't want to rehash the potential
security issues with this approach). I just want a simple utility
program, and would prefer not to to have to go through all the command
line stuff like TAKEOWN, ICACLS, etc, etc. And I want to do this for
the entire C: partition. And yes, I am aware of the security risks.


Thanks for all the comments and helpful suggestions. In addition to those,
and in case anybody else is interested, I did find some utilities that will
directly accomplish these tasks rather easily, which I've listed below:

For Folder and File Ownership: (adds a right mouse shortcut)

https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...-shortcut.html

For Registry Key Ownership:

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...-registry-keys

https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...ry-keys-easily


Might as well download this too:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/junctionbox/files/

You'll need it when you start getting recursive directories.
  #15  
Old September 17th 18, 06:38 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default Removing all registry, folder, and file restrictions (ownership, permissions, etc)

Mayayana wrote:
"Bill in Co" wrote

and in case anybody else is interested, I did find some utilities that
will directly accomplish these tasks rather easily, which I've listed
below:

For Folder and File Ownership: (adds a right mouse shortcut)

https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorial...-shortcut.html

For Registry Key Ownership:


https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...-registry-keys


https://www.thewindowsclub.com/regow...ry-keys-easily


Those seem to be single item approaches, which is
what you said you didn't want. They also limit you
in terms of what you can change, restricting changes
in Program Files, System, etc.

I gave you a link last week. You said it didn't work.
Did you actually try it? If you're wary of 3rd-party
software then try it on a test box first. On the other
hand, what you're linking to is unknown 3rd-party
software.

-------------------------------------------

NT6 Restriction Fix
www.jsware.net/jsware/nt6fix.php5

I just tested it myself to confirm that it works OK:

Boot Win7-64 SP1 as fake admin. (That is, any
Administrator account other than the one with
username "Administrator".)

- Right-click FixNT6.exe and click "Run as Administrator".

- Enter path of C:\Program Files\Windows Media Player
- Check box for recursive restriction removal.
- Select Administrators.
- Click "Set Free" button.

WMP files all now have the same permissions as
before except that Administrators have full control.

Delete WMP folder. Reboot. Still no WMP folder.
Yippee!

I then did the same with C:\Windows\Branding.
Successfully deleted. You could do all of Program
Files if you wanted to, but that's not a great idea.
Why reduce security for things like IE when you
have no need to replace the EXE anyway?

Important notes:

* FixNT6.exe needs to be run elevated as a fake admin.

* Freeing things for all users can often be done by
first freeing them for all admins, but it's not dependable
and it's not advisable. It's assumed that you're normally
running as a fake admin. If you run as a common user
it would make no sense to remove restrictions.

* Freeing Registry keys is almost exactly the same
operation, but I didn't include it because it's undependable
unless you create the key yourself. Since the restrictions
are in HKLM\Software\ and those rarely need to be changed,
I left that function out of NT6Fix. If you really want to
free up masses of those keys then your other links might
be useful.

* I wrote NT6Fix for myself when I first started dealing
with Vista/7 and trying to figure out what could be done
to salvage them. The whole point is exactly what you
were asking for: A very simple method to recursively
remove restrictions on large areas of C:\.

Still, I'd think twice before doing too much. If you
free up something like C:\Windows\System32\, what
value is that going to be to you? On the other hand,
it would allow malware to do things like replace system
libraries. That's not a likely risk, but protection is
still protection. If you wanted to do something like
delete the Windows Update files (which I do on XP)
then it would make more sense to just free those
specific files.
But Win7 is very brittle. Any deleting of system files
should be done on an experimental basis where possibly
losing the whole system is not a problem.

For anyone who's curious, the basic code for FixNT6
is here, as a VB6 project:

www.jsware.net/jsware/vbcode.php5#perms2

That webpage explains the basics. The download
also has an extensive readme file and the code
includes commments.

The gist of it is that of numerous, convoluted
methods MS have cooked up to adjust permissions,
the method I used was the simplest one I could
find and works dependably. It uses the standard
Windows API functions to go through several steps:

* Apply for permission to change ownership.
* Take ownership.
* Change permissions.
* Give back permission to change ownership.

It's a bizarre system. You have full control to
"own" an item but must jump through hoops to
do it. Once you officially own the item you can
change permissions. It's sort of like having
a wacky robot guarding your house who recognizes
you but won't shut itsellf off until you "step into the
magic circle" and sing "Over the Rainbow". But
once you do that, the robot recognizes your
authority over it and you have free run of the
house!


Thanks. I may try that again, as I can't remember now what didn't work for
me. And yes, I was looking for a more global or universal fix, but at this
point, am about ready to live with some of these restrictions. Thanks for
the reminder of that program.


 




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