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Activation problems



 
 
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  #31  
Old July 1st 14, 02:49 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.



Generic OEM will work. Branded OEM will not. Neither is "allowed" by the
license you don't get to read until it's too late for a refund if you
don't agree with it.

Pardon my ignorance but what's the difference between generic and
branded?


Branded is when you buy a computer with Windows preinstalled. Generic is
this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16832416806


--
Alias
Ads
  #32  
Old July 1st 14, 11:50 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,294
Default Activation problems

In message , Alias
writes:
Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.



Generic OEM will work. Branded OEM will not. Neither is "allowed" by
the license you don't get to read until it's too late for a refund if
you don't agree with it.

If that's really true, it would fall foul of the UK's "Unfair contract
terms" legislation.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Diplomacy is the art of letting someone have your way.
  #33  
Old July 2nd 14, 10:34 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Al Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 793
Default Activation problems

On 7/1/2014 9:46 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 6/30/2014 6:31 PM, Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.


That's fine with me. I have never purchased OEM.

I've never purchased retail.

Have you ever purchased OEM?


Many times, both branded and generic. The only time I've bought branded
is with laptops. Why pay more for the same thing?

I agree that paying more for something that is the same is a bad idea
but my understanding was that the retail version was different. I
thought that the OEM version can not be moved to a new computer when you
retire the original. Sometimes I refer to upgrade a system or give one
away but keep the OS for future use. If I'm wrong then I've been
spending needlessly, I agree.


  #34  
Old July 2nd 14, 10:38 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Al Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 793
Default Activation problems

On 7/1/2014 9:49 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.



Generic OEM will work. Branded OEM will not. Neither is "allowed" by the
license you don't get to read until it's too late for a refund if you
don't agree with it.

Pardon my ignorance but what's the difference between generic and
branded?


Branded is when you buy a computer with Windows preinstalled. Generic is
this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16832416806


OK, so that one in your link is simply purchasing the OEM OS without the
computer. Can you move it to another system the same as the retail OS or
does it have to be kept on the original computer is gets installed on?


  #35  
Old July 2nd 14, 11:49 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 9:46 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 6/30/2014 6:31 PM, Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.


That's fine with me. I have never purchased OEM.

I've never purchased retail.

Have you ever purchased OEM?


Many times, both branded and generic. The only time I've bought branded
is with laptops. Why pay more for the same thing?

I agree that paying more for something that is the same is a bad idea
but my understanding was that the retail version was different. I
thought that the OEM version can not be moved to a new computer when you
retire the original.


"May" not. It obviously can be moved. All you gotta do is wait 120 days.

Sometimes I refer to upgrade a system or give one
away but keep the OS for future use. If I'm wrong then I've been
spending needlessly, I agree.




--
Alias
  #36  
Old July 2nd 14, 11:51 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 9:49 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.



Generic OEM will work. Branded OEM will not. Neither is "allowed" by
the
license you don't get to read until it's too late for a refund if you
don't agree with it.

Pardon my ignorance but what's the difference between generic and
branded?


Branded is when you buy a computer with Windows preinstalled. Generic is
this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16832416806


OK, so that one in your link is simply purchasing the OEM OS without the
computer. Can you move it to another system the same as the retail OS or
does it have to be kept on the original computer is gets installed on?



MS says you may not. Experience says you can if you wait 120 days.
Besides, what's a "new computer"? MS has never stated what part of a
computer is "the" computer. Is it the processor, mother board, RAM,
case, a screw that got updated? I have even called to activate
successfully by stating I upgraded everything in the computer except the
case.

--
Alias
  #37  
Old July 2nd 14, 11:53 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Alias
writes:
Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.



Generic OEM will work. Branded OEM will not. Neither is "allowed" by
the license you don't get to read until it's too late for a refund if
you don't agree with it.

If that's really true, it would fall foul of the UK's "Unfair contract
terms" legislation.


If you open the package, you cannot get a refund. And to see the EULA,
you need to open the package unless in the UK, the EULA is on the
outside of the package.

--
Alias
  #38  
Old July 2nd 14, 12:59 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Andy Burns[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 399
Default Activation problems

Alias wrote:

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

If that's really true, it would fall foul of the UK's "Unfair contract
terms" legislation.


If you open the package, you cannot get a refund. And to see the EULA,
you need to open the package unless in the UK, the EULA is on the
outside of the package.


The outside of my Win7 Ultimate box (Retail not OEM) says

"You must accept the enclosed license terms before you can use this
software. To read the license terms go to www.microsoft.com/useterms"


  #39  
Old July 2nd 14, 01:25 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
. . .winston
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,345
Default Activation problems

Alias wrote, On 7/2/2014 6:51 AM:


MS says you may not. Experience says you can if you wait 120 days.
Besides, what's a "new computer"? MS has never stated what part of a
computer is "the" computer. Is it the processor, mother board, RAM,
case, a screw that got updated? I have even called to activate
successfully by stating I upgraded everything in the computer except the
case.


Apparently stated more clearly than understood

cf. Win7 EULA
qp
License Model. The software is licensed on a per copy per computer
basis. A computer is a physical hardware system with an internal storage
device capable of running the software. A hardware partition or blade is
considered to be a separate computer.
/qp

Doesn't appear that a mobo, processor, ram, case or screw meet the above.


--
...winston
msft mvp consumer apps
  #40  
Old July 2nd 14, 01:51 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

.. . .winston wrote:
Alias wrote, On 7/2/2014 6:51 AM:


MS says you may not. Experience says you can if you wait 120 days.
Besides, what's a "new computer"? MS has never stated what part of a
computer is "the" computer. Is it the processor, mother board, RAM,
case, a screw that got updated? I have even called to activate
successfully by stating I upgraded everything in the computer except the
case.


Apparently stated more clearly than understood

cf. Win7 EULA
qp
License Model. The software is licensed on a per copy per computer
basis. A computer is a physical hardware system with an internal storage
device capable of running the software. A hardware partition or blade is
considered to be a separate computer.
/qp

Doesn't appear that a mobo, processor, ram, case or screw meet the above.



And so if your hard drive dies, they expect you to buy another license?

--
Alias
  #41  
Old July 2nd 14, 01:52 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

Andy Burns wrote:
Alias wrote:

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

If that's really true, it would fall foul of the UK's "Unfair contract
terms" legislation.


If you open the package, you cannot get a refund. And to see the EULA,
you need to open the package unless in the UK, the EULA is on the
outside of the package.


The outside of my Win7 Ultimate box (Retail not OEM) says

"You must accept the enclosed license terms before you can use this
software. To read the license terms go to www.microsoft.com/useterms"



I guess they are finally waking up to the problem but what if you don't
have Internet access? Or you won't have it until Windows is installed?

--
Alias
  #42  
Old July 2nd 14, 02:35 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,017
Default Activation problems

| MS says you may not. Experience says you can if you wait 120 days.
| Besides, what's a "new computer"? MS has never stated what part of a
| computer is "the" computer. Is it the processor, mother board, RAM,
| case, a screw that got updated? I have even called to activate
| successfully by stating I upgraded everything in the computer except the
| case.
|
|
| Apparently stated more clearly than understood
|
| cf. Win7 EULA
| qp
| License Model. The software is licensed on a per copy per computer
| basis. A computer is a physical hardware system with an internal storage
| device capable of running the software. A hardware partition or blade is
| considered to be a separate computer.
| /qp
|
| Doesn't appear that a mobo, processor, ram, case or screw meet the above.
|

That's an interesting clarification. As I recall, when
Product Activation was originally instituted, MS said
the motherboard was the official licensee. The WinME
packaging said the software was licensed both to the
person and the hardware. Which raises interesting questions:

If I die does my motherboard have the right to assign
a new co-licensee? If so, then surely I can assign a new
co-licensee if my motherboard dies. If not then how can
the software be licensed to the motherboard?

XP OEM says the following:

----------------
The term "COMPUTER" as used herein shall mean the HARDWARE, if
the HARDWARE is a single computer system, or shall mean the
computer system with which the HARDWARE operates, if the
HARDWARE is a computer system component.
......
The SOFTWARE
is licensed with the HARDWARE as a single integrated
product and may only be used with the HARDWARE. If the
SOFTWARE is not accompanied by new HARDWARE, you may
not use the SOFTWARE.
--------------

So if the dealer sends a screw with the disk in order to
fulfill the requirment, that screw must be used in all
installations of the software.

The defining of a "hard disk or partition" seems to be new
to Win7. With Vista it says the license must be assigned to
a single "hardware system".

In fact there really is no such thing as a computer, so
there's no easy way to define the license. So they started
saying "device". And now they say, according to your
quote, that the software is licensed *per disk partition*.
All of it is an attempt to connect physical limitations and
disintegration with intellectual property, as is true with
printed books. It never quite works and never achieves
credibility because the intellectual property is not truly connected
in any meaningful way with the hardware. It could be the
disk, but since most computers
don't even come with a disk, Microsoft has forfeited that
option. There isn't any clean way to deal with it. For that
reason, Product Activation turned out to be a good
solution. It's a kind of legal passive aggression. They
don't need to argue in courts about the whole thing. By
tying the system to an OEM box and providing no disk,
Microsoft has ensured that 99% of computers bought
or built will lose Windows when something breaks. Thus
the situation has been reversed: Rather than end-users
using Windows twice, illegally, Microsoft is passively
forcing people to buy software licenses they've already
paid for when they buy a replacement computer or have
repairs done. And for the most part, the public have no
idea that they're being cheated.


  #43  
Old July 2nd 14, 05:49 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Al Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 793
Default Activation problems

On 7/2/2014 6:49 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 9:46 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 6/30/2014 6:31 PM, Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.


That's fine with me. I have never purchased OEM.

I've never purchased retail.

Have you ever purchased OEM?

Many times, both branded and generic. The only time I've bought branded
is with laptops. Why pay more for the same thing?

I agree that paying more for something that is the same is a bad idea
but my understanding was that the retail version was different. I
thought that the OEM version can not be moved to a new computer when you
retire the original.


"May" not. It obviously can be moved. All you gotta do is wait 120 days.

Sometimes I refer to upgrade a system or give one
away but keep the OS for future use. If I'm wrong then I've been
spending needlessly, I agree.




Ok, Now I'm begging to get it. Sorry if I'm a slow learner. Now answer
me this. Is this 120 day wait in conflict with the terms set by
Microsoft? Maybe I have been misunderstanding more than I thought.


  #44  
Old July 2nd 14, 06:14 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Alias[_73_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 100
Default Activation problems

Al Drake wrote:
On 7/2/2014 6:49 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 9:46 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 6/30/2014 6:31 PM, Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to
try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.


That's fine with me. I have never purchased OEM.

I've never purchased retail.

Have you ever purchased OEM?

Many times, both branded and generic. The only time I've bought branded
is with laptops. Why pay more for the same thing?

I agree that paying more for something that is the same is a bad idea
but my understanding was that the retail version was different. I
thought that the OEM version can not be moved to a new computer when you
retire the original.


"May" not. It obviously can be moved. All you gotta do is wait 120 days.

Sometimes I refer to upgrade a system or give one
away but keep the OS for future use. If I'm wrong then I've been
spending needlessly, I agree.




Ok, Now I'm begging to get it. Sorry if I'm a slow learner. Now answer
me this. Is this 120 day wait in conflict with the terms set by
Microsoft? Maybe I have been misunderstanding more than I thought.



If you do it, MS does not approve. They want you to buy another license
rather than move a generic OEM to another computer or (horrors!) install
the same license on two or more computers.

--
Alias
  #45  
Old July 2nd 14, 10:16 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Al Drake
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 793
Default Activation problems

On 7/2/2014 1:14 PM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/2/2014 6:49 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 9:46 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 7/1/2014 6:50 AM, Alias wrote:
Al Drake wrote:
On 6/30/2014 6:31 PM, Mayayana wrote:
| After 120 days, MS wipes the slate clean and if you were to
try an
| activate another computer with the same license, it will
activate
online.
|

I've never heard of that. It may work. I've
never tried it. But I do know that OEM is not
licensed for that.


That's fine with me. I have never purchased OEM.

I've never purchased retail.

Have you ever purchased OEM?

Many times, both branded and generic. The only time I've bought
branded
is with laptops. Why pay more for the same thing?

I agree that paying more for something that is the same is a bad idea
but my understanding was that the retail version was different. I
thought that the OEM version can not be moved to a new computer when
you
retire the original.

"May" not. It obviously can be moved. All you gotta do is wait 120 days.

Sometimes I refer to upgrade a system or give one
away but keep the OS for future use. If I'm wrong then I've been
spending needlessly, I agree.




Ok, Now I'm begging to get it. Sorry if I'm a slow learner. Now answer
me this. Is this 120 day wait in conflict with the terms set by
Microsoft? Maybe I have been misunderstanding more than I thought.



If you do it, MS does not approve. They want you to buy another license
rather than move a generic OEM to another computer or (horrors!) install
the same license on two or more computers.

Then regardless of what anyone thinks when someone install Windows OS
they agree with the terms that means however it is worded their
interpretation is the only one that counts. Yes? No?


 




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