A Windows XP help forum. PCbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PCbanter forum » Microsoft Windows XP » Hardware and Windows XP
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

wrong letter system drive



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 7th 12, 05:24 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive

I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from (some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?



--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os

Ads
  #2  
Old May 7th 12, 05:53 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,278
Default wrong letter system drive

Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from (some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?


In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.

I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.

You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip

That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.

Paul
  #3  
Old May 7th 12, 06:42 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive


"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from (some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?


In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.



No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.



I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.



Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in Windows you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...



You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip

That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.




--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os


  #4  
Old May 7th 12, 07:30 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,278
Default wrong letter system drive

Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from (some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?

In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.



No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.



Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in Windows you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip

That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.


What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.

Paul
  #5  
Old May 7th 12, 08:20 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive

"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from
(some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?
In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.



No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.



Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I
checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in Windows
you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip

That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.


What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.





Look what I found in the meantime:

http://www.petri.co.il/change_system...windows_xp.htm

Think I'll try that first of all comming friday...


--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os

  #6  
Old May 7th 12, 10:42 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,278
Default wrong letter system drive

Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from
(some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?
In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.


No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.


Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I
checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in
Windows you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip


That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk
Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.


What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.





Look what I found in the meantime:

http://www.petri.co.il/change_system...windows_xp.htm

Think I'll try that first of all comming friday...



It's true. There's a recipe for it.

When that won't work, is after you've installed MS Office. Or
other products that key off the drive letter details. Then, after
you use the petri.co.il suggestion, the applications that key off
the letter, will have a problem. Most "naive" (inexpensive) software
doesn't have a problem. But bigger packages like Office don't like
it. And since you've just installed the system anyway, there's not
likely to be anything on there (yet) that will get upset.

But if you did it six months from now, after reinstalling all apps,
it might be a different story.

The same can apply, to the drive letter assigned to the optical drive.
It's best, to change that right after the install, and then leave
it set that way for good. Again, some tools "look" for their original
installer CD, on a particular drive letter. Yes, it can probably
be fixed, one application at a time, in the registry.

Another thing that has a drive letter setting, is System File Checker.
But the odds of that working seamlessly, without screwing with it,
are so low, it hardly counts as an issue. The last time I tested it, I
had to set two registry entries to get it to work.

Paul
  #7  
Old May 7th 12, 11:32 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,229
Default wrong letter system drive

Linea Recta wrote:

"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from
(some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?
In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.


No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.


Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I
checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in Windows
you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip

That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.


What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.


Look what I found in the meantime:

http://www.petri.co.il/change_system...windows_xp.htm

Think I'll try that first of all comming friday...


That won't change all the other registry keys and their data items with
values that have "C:" in them for a path to a file or folder. For
example, currently your "My Documents" folder is under "C:\Documents and
Settings\youraccount\My Documents". If you read the article you
mentioned, you'll see that you are not changing the registry entry for
that special folder. In regedit, go to:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Explorer\Shell Folders
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Explorer\User Shell Folders

What paths are listed for those special folders? If you then manage to
change D: to C: (which means one of your other hard disks become D,
the registry will be pointing to a path on your other hard disk that
doesn't exist.

That article addresses how to change what [DOS] drive letter is attached
to which volume. That you see different drive letters assigned to the
hard disks in Windows Explorer doesn't address the drive letters already
implanted into the registry and configuration files.

Before you make the changes mentioned in that article, run regedit.exe
and do a search on "D:\" to see how many entries there are. Even in a
fresh install of Windows, there will many of these.

I recall seeing utilities (usually payware) that tried to make all the
regedit changes (don't know about any config files) so the boot drive
could be changed. (NOTE: Microsoft calls the drive with the boot sector
and boot loader the system drive and the drive with all the operating
system the boot drive; see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470.
Yeah, it's backwards. In most setups, the system and boot drive are the
same; i.e., users put all of Windows into one partition, so system drive
is boot drive.). Since you *just* installed Windows, why not do it
again (as above) by hiding the other hard disks during the install of
Windows?
  #8  
Old May 7th 12, 11:33 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,229
Default wrong letter system drive

Linea Recta wrote:

I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from (some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.


Huh? Do you mean you replace a bad hard disk with a new one?

Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made?


The partitions on the hard disks (other than where you installed
Windows) were visible during the install of Windows.

And how can I fix this situation?


Windows can recognize other partitions that have FAT/NTFS on them. So
the Windows installer can't see the other recognizable partition on the
other hard disk(s), either disable them in BIOS or pull their power
cable (when the PC is powered down) so that nothing can find those other
hard disks. Leave the one hard disk connected to power when you boot
your PC and do the new Windows install. Since it can only see the one
hard disk, it will assign C: to it. After you finish the Windows
install, power down, reconnect the other hard disks, and power up.
Windows will now see the other hard disks and resolve the drive
assignment conflict by giving them different drive letters.
  #9  
Old May 8th 12, 11:07 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive


"VanguardLH" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:

I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from (some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.


Huh? Do you mean you replace a bad hard disk with a new one?



I replaced it with 'another' working one, not 'new' to be exact. It's all
old stuff this computer and nowadays it's hard to get a new IDE hard drive.



Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made?


The partitions on the hard disks (other than where you installed
Windows) were visible during the install of Windows.

And how can I fix this situation?


Windows can recognize other partitions that have FAT/NTFS on them. So
the Windows installer can't see the other recognizable partition on the
other hard disk(s), either disable them in BIOS or pull their power
cable (when the PC is powered down) so that nothing can find those other
hard disks. Leave the one hard disk connected to power when you boot
your PC and do the new Windows install. Since it can only see the one
hard disk, it will assign C: to it. After you finish the Windows
install, power down, reconnect the other hard disks, and power up.
Windows will now see the other hard disks and resolve the drive
assignment conflict by giving them different drive letters.



OK, the installer draw the wrong conclusion for me (I wasn't aked anything
about this during install), but thanks for the work around in future. It may
be as much as 10 years ago since I installed an OS. On my own computers I
never had to do this over twice :-)



--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os



  #10  
Old May 8th 12, 11:13 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive


"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from
(some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows
XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?
In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.


No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard
drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.


Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I
checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in
Windows you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip


That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk
Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday
I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.

What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.





Look what I found in the meantime:

http://www.petri.co.il/change_system...windows_xp.htm

Think I'll try that first of all comming friday...



It's true. There's a recipe for it.

When that won't work, is after you've installed MS Office. Or
other products that key off the drive letter details. Then, after
you use the petri.co.il suggestion, the applications that key off
the letter, will have a problem. Most "naive" (inexpensive) software
doesn't have a problem. But bigger packages like Office don't like
it. And since you've just installed the system anyway, there's not
likely to be anything on there (yet) that will get upset.

But if you did it six months from now, after reinstalling all apps,
it might be a different story.



Of course, I understand. But this is a new install from scratch. That's why
I want to resolve the drive letter issue before proceeding with installing
of applications.



The same can apply, to the drive letter assigned to the optical drive.
It's best, to change that right after the install, and then leave
it set that way for good. Again, some tools "look" for their original
installer CD, on a particular drive letter. Yes, it can probably
be fixed, one application at a time, in the registry.

Another thing that has a drive letter setting, is System File Checker.
But the odds of that working seamlessly, without screwing with it,
are so low, it hardly counts as an issue. The last time I tested it, I
had to set two registry entries to get it to work.



OK thanks. I'll be back, be it with good or bad news :-)



--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os


  #11  
Old May 8th 12, 11:28 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive


"VanguardLH" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:

"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from
(some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows
XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?
In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.


No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard
drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.


Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I
checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in Windows
you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip

That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk
Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday
I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.

What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.


Look what I found in the meantime:

http://www.petri.co.il/change_system...windows_xp.htm

Think I'll try that first of all comming friday...


That won't change all the other registry keys and their data items with
values that have "C:" in them for a path to a file or folder. For
example, currently your "My Documents" folder is under "C:\Documents and
Settings\youraccount\My Documents". If you read the article you
mentioned, you'll see that you are not changing the registry entry for
that special folder. In regedit, go to:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Explorer\Shell
Folders
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Curre ntVersion\Explorer\User
Shell Folders

What paths are listed for those special folders? If you then manage to
change D: to C: (which means one of your other hard disks become D,
the registry will be pointing to a path on your other hard disk that
doesn't exist.

That article addresses how to change what [DOS] drive letter is attached
to which volume. That you see different drive letters assigned to the
hard disks in Windows Explorer doesn't address the drive letters already
implanted into the registry and configuration files.

Before you make the changes mentioned in that article, run regedit.exe
and do a search on "D:\" to see how many entries there are. Even in a
fresh install of Windows, there will many of these.



D: only contains docs, no programs.



I recall seeing utilities (usually payware) that tried to make all the
regedit changes (don't know about any config files) so the boot drive
could be changed. (NOTE: Microsoft calls the drive with the boot sector
and boot loader the system drive and the drive with all the operating
system the boot drive; see http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470.
Yeah, it's backwards. In most setups, the system and boot drive are the
same; i.e., users put all of Windows into one partition, so system drive
is boot drive.). Since you *just* installed Windows, why not do it
again (as above) by hiding the other hard disks during the install of
Windows?



You might be right after all. To be shure I think I'll do that, despite of
all the time it will take. Thanks.


--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os


  #12  
Old May 11th 12, 05:30 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Linea Recta[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 742
Default wrong letter system drive

"Linea Recta" schreef in bericht
...

"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
"Paul" schreef in bericht
...
Linea Recta wrote:
I removed a broken hard drive (which was Window system drive) from
(some
one's older computer) and built in a working drive.
Configured all in BIOS, OK so far.
Now I partitioned & formatted the "new" drive and installed Windows
XP
(SP3), taking care to choose the swapped drive label as the Windows
partition, not to overwrite the other existent HD.
After installation Windows seems to reside on the D: instead of C:.

What the .....*%%&$ ?!

What mistake can I have made? And how can I fix this situation?
In Disk Management, what comes before it ?

The thing is, you might have manually partitioned the drive,
put multiple partitions, then installed to the second partition,
and that ends up as D:.


No, I made just one partition. The computer had (and has) 2 hard
drives,
both containing only one (default max sized) partition.


I've managed to do that, by doing a "hard drive install", copying
the CD into one partition, and trying to install into another
partition. By accident, I put the partitions in the wrong order
(as seen in the partition table).

So it's a matter of you looking at the available storage
devices, and discovering "what came before" the partition
in question, and solving it before reinstalling. It's possible
to "hide" a partition.


Windows is installed on the right partition (= drive, in my case) I
checked
this, problem is only it now has wrong drive letter. I know in
Windows you
can change drive letters, but not the system drive...


You can review the partitions with this, if you need more
inspiration.
(If you run this in Windows 7, you need to "Run as Administrator" or
you'll get "error 5". Fewer problems expected with WinXP.)

ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/englis...s/PTEDIT32.zip


That will show you the partition table, which slots are occupied in
the partition table, and so on.

You can compare and correlate the info from PTEDIT32 to Disk
Management,
and see things you might otherwise miss.



Thanks for your reply. I'll see what I can do with the link. On friday
I
hope to continue working on the mentioned computer locally.

What happens if just the "target" drive is physically connected during
the install. Does it still become "D:" ?

There's got to be an explanation, for the choice of drive letters
during installation.

Drives are detected in "hardware order". A certain order for busses,
and port order for controllers. In theory, you might be able to
predict which drive comes first. It's easier, to just disconnect
unrelated hardware, during the basic install, as a means to get
it to be "c:".

In general, OS installers are not to be trusted. I've had Linux
install the necessary files to "disk1", and then, when it comes
time to install GRUB, install that to "disk0" and wipe my WinXP
MBR boot code. It took the recovery console and "fixmbr" to repair
the damage. As a result of mishaps like that, I generally disconnect
everything but the target hard drive, so the installer has no choice
in the matter.

Another observation. Even the "disable" function for SATA ports in
the BIOS, does not work. You can disable a port in the BIOS, and
an OS/installer can still find the port and turn it on and write
to the disk. (The hardware does not feature "trap-door" style
controls, so a setting in the BIOS can easily be reversed.)
It means, based on seeing this happen, that I have no choice
but to unplug the SATA cable (knowing the connector is only rated
for 50 cycles). An unplugged cable is a good way to prevent
surprises of all sorts.





Look what I found in the meantime:

http://www.petri.co.il/change_system...windows_xp.htm

Think I'll try that first of all comming friday...



It's true. There's a recipe for it.

When that won't work, is after you've installed MS Office. Or
other products that key off the drive letter details. Then, after
you use the petri.co.il suggestion, the applications that key off
the letter, will have a problem. Most "naive" (inexpensive) software
doesn't have a problem. But bigger packages like Office don't like
it. And since you've just installed the system anyway, there's not
likely to be anything on there (yet) that will get upset.

But if you did it six months from now, after reinstalling all apps,
it might be a different story.



Of course, I understand. But this is a new install from scratch. That's
why I want to resolve the drive letter issue before proceeding with
installing of applications.



The same can apply, to the drive letter assigned to the optical drive.
It's best, to change that right after the install, and then leave
it set that way for good. Again, some tools "look" for their original
installer CD, on a particular drive letter. Yes, it can probably
be fixed, one application at a time, in the registry.

Another thing that has a drive letter setting, is System File Checker.
But the odds of that working seamlessly, without screwing with it,
are so low, it hardly counts as an issue. The last time I tested it, I
had to set two registry entries to get it to work.



OK thanks. I'll be back, be it with good or bad news :-)




Today I disconnected the second hard drive temporarily and did a new install
all over (partition, formatted, new install Windows) and all is OK now.



--
regards,

|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 PCbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.