A Windows XP help forum. PCbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PCbanter forum » Microsoft Windows XP » Hardware and Windows XP
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

USB to PS2 converter



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 18th 12, 07:16 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Jo-Anne[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,101
Default USB to PS2 converter

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had gotten
clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the same
five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse. What
sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse as
Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne


Ads
  #2  
Old July 18th 12, 09:22 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
JJ[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 71
Default USB to PS2 converter

"Jo-Anne" wrote:

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose
cable had a broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five
wires were crimped into a piece of plastic, it looked like it
would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers
had gotten clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the
cables have the same five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical
mouse. What sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP
recognize the mouse as Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!


USB mouse/keyboard need USB plug, and PS2 mouse/keyboard need PS2
plug. You can't simply fix it with different plug, or you may
damage your mouse and/or your PC. Replacing the whole mouse is
recommended. Otherwise you'll need a spare USB cable and soldering
skills with basic electronic knowledge.

For USB mouse/keyboard to PS2 converter, and vice-versa. They are
like the ones shown he

http://www.google.com/search?q=%22us...2+converter%22

PS2 mouse/keyboard isn't Plug-and-Play. While Windows can detect
its type, it can't detect its removal (when unplugged) or its
arrival (when plugged).
  #3  
Old July 18th 12, 01:54 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,286
Default USB to PS2 converter

"Jo-Anne" wrote:

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had gotten
clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the same
five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse. What
sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse as
Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne


The mouse itself has to sense which type of connection you use (USB or
PS/2) to adjust to using that connection. A simple USB-to-PS/2 adapter
will not magically make a USB-only mouse suddenly work on a PS/2
connector. If the mouse doesn't support both USB and PS/2 protocols
then you have to buy an *active* converter into which you plug the USB
mouse and then plug the converter into the PS/2 port. These are pretty
expensive ($80+) so you might as well as look as buying a new mouse.

Does the mouse you want to fix actually state in its specifications from
its maker that it supports both USB and PS/2 connections? The *mouse*
has to have the logic to sense the connection type and switch between
the different hardware protocols.

I'm not sure if you are trying to fix the old mouse that was USB so it
now uses PS2 (and then whether or not you intend to plug it into a USB
port through an adapter), or if you intend to use an old PS2 mouse and
make it work on a USB port.

Active adapter for USB to PS/2 ($145):
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...=SPM6517889302

What hardware protocols did the old broken mouse support?
- USB only.
- PS/2 only.
- Both USB and PS/2.
  #4  
Old July 18th 12, 09:34 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Jo-Anne[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,101
Default USB to PS2 converter

"Jo-Anne" wrote in message
...
I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had
gotten clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the
same five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse.
What sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse
as Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne



Before I do more checking on the basis of what JJ and Vanguard said (and I
thank you both), I should clarify: What I have in mind is keeping the
optical mouse, with all its electronics, but substituting the cable/cord
from one of the older mice, which seems to have the same connector to the
mouse itself--but a PS2 connector to the computer.

Also, I just discovered that I have a never-used Belkin USB-to-PS2 adapter
(not connector) that claims it will connect PS2 mice and keyboards to a USB
computer and that it "installs with plug-and-play ease" and requires no
drivers or power supply. I'm guessing that it might not work, but I thought
I'd ask. Could it be that the Belkin adapter is really a connector?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne



  #5  
Old July 18th 12, 10:43 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,278
Default USB to PS2 converter

Jo-Anne wrote:
"Jo-Anne" wrote in message
...
I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had
gotten clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the
same five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse.
What sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse
as Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne



Before I do more checking on the basis of what JJ and Vanguard said (and I
thank you both), I should clarify: What I have in mind is keeping the
optical mouse, with all its electronics, but substituting the cable/cord
from one of the older mice, which seems to have the same connector to the
mouse itself--but a PS2 connector to the computer.

Also, I just discovered that I have a never-used Belkin USB-to-PS2 adapter
(not connector) that claims it will connect PS2 mice and keyboards to a USB
computer and that it "installs with plug-and-play ease" and requires no
drivers or power supply. I'm guessing that it might not work, but I thought
I'd ask. Could it be that the Belkin adapter is really a connector?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne


The mouse you want to repair is USB.

If you have a PS/2 cable, you'd need to chop the head off it and fit
a USB connector. And they don't make "screw mount" connectors for that
kind of thing, because it would upset signal integrity.

The PS/2 cable itself, might only be designed with PS/2 signals
in mind. Maybe it has a crosstalk problem. We don't know if
all the internal details for the two cables are the same.

I really wouldn't be heading in that direction. It's about as
much work, as designing a mouse from scratch.

Look, if you want to fix it:

1) Buy a USB cable.
2) Chop the non-computer end off, exposing four wires and shield.
3) Solder four wires and shield, to the inside of the mouse.
4) Wrap electrical tape around the wire, to form a crude strain
relief where the cable goes through the mouse casing. Or not.

Done.

Paul
  #6  
Old July 19th 12, 01:09 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Good Guy[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,354
Default USB to PS2 converter

On 18/07/2012 07:16, Jo-Anne wrote:
I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had gotten
clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the same
five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse. What
sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse as
Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne




Personally, why do you want to waste your time in such things. Go and
get a new mouse costing $3.99 and your problem is solved for the next
few years.

"Penny-wise, pound-foolish" simply doesn't make sense when getting a
proper hardware to do the job it is intended for. You want maximum
productivity from your effort but re[pairing a mouse doesn't make sense
in this respect. It is a false economy in my budget.

--
Good Guy
Website: http://mytaxsite.co.uk
Website: http://html-css.co.uk
Forums: http://mytaxsite.boardhost.com
Email: http://mytaxsite.co.uk/contact-us


  #7  
Old July 19th 12, 03:25 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,286
Default USB to PS2 converter

"Jo-Anne" wrote:

Before I do more checking on the basis of what JJ and Vanguard said (and I
thank you both), I should clarify: What I have in mind is keeping the
optical mouse, with all its electronics, but substituting the cable/cord
from one of the older mice, which seems to have the same connector to the
mouse itself--but a PS2 connector to the computer.

Also, I just discovered that I have a never-used Belkin USB-to-PS2 adapter
(not connector) that claims it will connect PS2 mice and keyboards to a USB
computer and that it "installs with plug-and-play ease" and requires no
drivers or power supply. I'm guessing that it might not work, but I thought
I'd ask. Could it be that the Belkin adapter is really a connector?


You cannot change a USB-only mouse to support PS/2 simply by changing
the connector (by replacing the cable or using a passive adapter). For
a mouse to support USB+PS/2 means it needs sense logic inside the mouse
to do that - or you have to use an *active* adapter to change between
the hardware protocols (USB-to-PS/2).

Again, you need to check if your old broken mouse supports. Is it:
- USB only?
- PS/2 only?
- Both USB and PS/2?
I'm talking about the mouse and its specification, not what you use for
a replacement cable or adapters at the end of the cable. The *mouse*
has to support the hardware protocol (or you need a *active* adapter to
substitute for missing logic inside the mouse).
  #8  
Old July 19th 12, 03:42 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,286
Default USB to PS2 converter

"Good Guy" wrote:

Jo-Anne wrote:

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had gotten
clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the same
five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse. What
sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse as
Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?


Personally, why do you want to waste your time in such things. Go and
get a new mouse costing $3.99 and your problem is solved for the next
few years.


It's not a question of money (since obviously the OP is willing to pay
over a hundred dollars on just one mouse). It's about what the OP likes
for shape and features of the mouse. What $4 mouse do you know of that
has the same shape as the one the OP described? As mice go, this is an
oddball shape, especially by elevating the wrist at the backside of the
mouse shell. Then show us what $4 mouse is going to have all the extra
buttons of the OP's old broken mouse?

The OP never bothered to clearly identify *which* mouse she is (was)
using. "Contour" applies to many mice since is is an extremely common
term to describe the shape of the mouse.

What if it was this oddjob?
http://ergo.contour-design.com/
You know a $4 mouse that is equivalent?

What if the OP was using this oddjob?
http://www.ergonomicsmadeeasy.com/st...contour-mouse/
This one contravenes most mouse designs. Instead of letting the fingers
curve naturally over and down the mouse, it keeps the fingers raised
horizontally which would force the wrist to angle up. You couldn't use
a mousepad with a wrist pad with this mouse because the wrist pad would
elevate your palm above the mouse shell. Also, it doesn't use a combo
scrollwheel/button; that is, the scrollwheel isn't used as the 3rd mouse
button. On this one, the middle button is really a button and the
scrollwheel is off on the side of the mouse shell. Just where do you
find a $4 mouse just like this one?

"Penny-wise, pound-foolish" simply doesn't make sense when getting a
proper hardware to do the job it is intended for. You want maximum
productivity from your effort but re[pairing a mouse doesn't make sense
in this respect. It is a false economy in my budget.


Foolish advice given that you haven't bothered to research what mouse
the OP might be discussing. You think everyone is using some super
cheapy mouse like you. At one time, I used the Kensington trackball.
This was when it had steel roller with ball bearings and not the cheaper
hardware they went to later. It was a tough device; however, whacking
the ball could get it scored and invariably when trying to make minute
mouse movement you'd hit the scratch. Did I have to buy a whole new
trackball? Nah, and despite your slipshod advice, I'd just go to a look
pool table store and buy a snooker ball (much cheaper than buying
replacement balls from Kensington). I've had mice whose buttons didn't
work well after some abuse. If the plastic shell for the mouse was
damaged (because the flex in the button portion of the shell is what
provides the spring to bring it off the PCB switch) then bending it back
up usually didn't work. If, however, the problem was with the PCB
micro-switch then I'd desolder it and solder in a new one. I'd just
head to the local electronics junk shop (carried tons of discarded or
old hardware) and grab a mouse for a dollar or two that had the switch
that I needed. Much cheaper than buying a new $30 mouse. Sorry, I
wouldn't touch those $4 cheapies you use.

What boob would replace a $110 mouse with a $4 cheapie?
  #9  
Old July 19th 12, 03:48 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
madmax
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default USB to PS2 converter

On Wed, 18 Jul 2012 21:42:00 -0500, VanguardLH wrote:

"Good Guy" wrote:

Jo-Anne wrote:

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had gotten
clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the same
five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse. What
sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse as
Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?


Personally, why do you want to waste your time in such things. Go and
get a new mouse costing $3.99 and your problem is solved for the next
few years.


It's not a question of money (since obviously the OP is willing to pay
over a hundred dollars on just one mouse). It's about what the OP likes
for shape and features of the mouse. What $4 mouse do you know of that
has the same shape as the one the OP described? As mice go, this is an
oddball shape, especially by elevating the wrist at the backside of the
mouse shell. Then show us what $4 mouse is going to have all the extra
buttons of the OP's old broken mouse?

The OP never bothered to clearly identify *which* mouse she is (was)
using. "Contour" applies to many mice since is is an extremely common
term to describe the shape of the mouse.

What if it was this oddjob?
http://ergo.contour-design.com/
You know a $4 mouse that is equivalent?

What if the OP was using this oddjob?
http://www.ergonomicsmadeeasy.com/st...contour-mouse/
This one contravenes most mouse designs. Instead of letting the fingers
curve naturally over and down the mouse, it keeps the fingers raised
horizontally which would force the wrist to angle up. You couldn't use
a mousepad with a wrist pad with this mouse because the wrist pad would
elevate your palm above the mouse shell. Also, it doesn't use a combo
scrollwheel/button; that is, the scrollwheel isn't used as the 3rd mouse
button. On this one, the middle button is really a button and the
scrollwheel is off on the side of the mouse shell. Just where do you
find a $4 mouse just like this one?

"Penny-wise, pound-foolish" simply doesn't make sense when getting a
proper hardware to do the job it is intended for. You want maximum
productivity from your effort but re[pairing a mouse doesn't make sense
in this respect. It is a false economy in my budget.


Foolish advice given that you haven't bothered to research what mouse
the OP might be discussing. You think everyone is using some super
cheapy mouse like you. At one time, I used the Kensington trackball.
This was when it had steel roller with ball bearings and not the cheaper
hardware they went to later. It was a tough device; however, whacking
the ball could get it scored and invariably when trying to make minute
mouse movement you'd hit the scratch. Did I have to buy a whole new
trackball? Nah, and despite your slipshod advice, I'd just go to a look
pool table store and buy a snooker ball (much cheaper than buying
replacement balls from Kensington). I've had mice whose buttons didn't
work well after some abuse. If the plastic shell for the mouse was
damaged (because the flex in the button portion of the shell is what
provides the spring to bring it off the PCB switch) then bending it back
up usually didn't work. If, however, the problem was with the PCB
micro-switch then I'd desolder it and solder in a new one. I'd just
head to the local electronics junk shop (carried tons of discarded or
old hardware) and grab a mouse for a dollar or two that had the switch
that I needed. Much cheaper than buying a new $30 mouse. Sorry, I
wouldn't touch those $4 cheapies you use.

What boob would replace a $110 mouse with a $4 cheapie?



If a boob is willing to pay $110 for a mouse, all bets are off.




  #10  
Old July 19th 12, 05:23 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Jo-Anne[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,101
Default USB to PS2 converter

"VanguardLH" wrote in message
...
"Good Guy" wrote:

Jo-Anne wrote:

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into
a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had
gotten
clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have the same
five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse.
What
sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the mouse as
Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?


Personally, why do you want to waste your time in such things. Go and
get a new mouse costing $3.99 and your problem is solved for the next
few years.


It's not a question of money (since obviously the OP is willing to pay
over a hundred dollars on just one mouse). It's about what the OP likes
for shape and features of the mouse. What $4 mouse do you know of that
has the same shape as the one the OP described? As mice go, this is an
oddball shape, especially by elevating the wrist at the backside of the
mouse shell. Then show us what $4 mouse is going to have all the extra
buttons of the OP's old broken mouse?

The OP never bothered to clearly identify *which* mouse she is (was)
using. "Contour" applies to many mice since is is an extremely common
term to describe the shape of the mouse.

What if it was this oddjob?
http://ergo.contour-design.com/
You know a $4 mouse that is equivalent?

What if the OP was using this oddjob?
http://www.ergonomicsmadeeasy.com/st...contour-mouse/
This one contravenes most mouse designs. Instead of letting the fingers
curve naturally over and down the mouse, it keeps the fingers raised
horizontally which would force the wrist to angle up. You couldn't use
a mousepad with a wrist pad with this mouse because the wrist pad would
elevate your palm above the mouse shell. Also, it doesn't use a combo
scrollwheel/button; that is, the scrollwheel isn't used as the 3rd mouse
button. On this one, the middle button is really a button and the
scrollwheel is off on the side of the mouse shell. Just where do you
find a $4 mouse just like this one?

"Penny-wise, pound-foolish" simply doesn't make sense when getting a
proper hardware to do the job it is intended for. You want maximum
productivity from your effort but re[pairing a mouse doesn't make sense
in this respect. It is a false economy in my budget.


Foolish advice given that you haven't bothered to research what mouse
the OP might be discussing. You think everyone is using some super
cheapy mouse like you. At one time, I used the Kensington trackball.
This was when it had steel roller with ball bearings and not the cheaper
hardware they went to later. It was a tough device; however, whacking
the ball could get it scored and invariably when trying to make minute
mouse movement you'd hit the scratch. Did I have to buy a whole new
trackball? Nah, and despite your slipshod advice, I'd just go to a look
pool table store and buy a snooker ball (much cheaper than buying
replacement balls from Kensington). I've had mice whose buttons didn't
work well after some abuse. If the plastic shell for the mouse was
damaged (because the flex in the button portion of the shell is what
provides the spring to bring it off the PCB switch) then bending it back
up usually didn't work. If, however, the problem was with the PCB
micro-switch then I'd desolder it and solder in a new one. I'd just
head to the local electronics junk shop (carried tons of discarded or
old hardware) and grab a mouse for a dollar or two that had the switch
that I needed. Much cheaper than buying a new $30 mouse. Sorry, I
wouldn't touch those $4 cheapies you use.

What boob would replace a $110 mouse with a $4 cheapie?



Well said, Vanguard. The Contour Mouse itself is actually only one of around
four designs offered by Contour Design; I've never had the opportunity to
try the others. Mine is this one:

http://ergo.contour-design.com/produ...mouse/features

and the wrist does rest on the desktop or mouse pad. It's the hand and
fingers that curl over the top of the mouse. I find it relaxing to use.

Given what you, Paul, and JJ said, however, I'll probably give up the idea
of replacing the cable in my old mouse...

Thank you!

Jo-Anne

Jo-Anne


  #11  
Old July 19th 12, 05:25 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Jo-Anne[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,101
Default USB to PS2 converter

"Paul" wrote in message
...
Jo-Anne wrote:
"Jo-Anne" wrote in message
...
I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose cable had a
broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five wires were crimped into
a
piece of plastic, it looked like it would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers had
gotten clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the cables have
the
same five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical mouse.
What sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP recognize the
mouse
as Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne



Before I do more checking on the basis of what JJ and Vanguard said (and
I
thank you both), I should clarify: What I have in mind is keeping the
optical mouse, with all its electronics, but substituting the cable/cord
from one of the older mice, which seems to have the same connector to the
mouse itself--but a PS2 connector to the computer.

Also, I just discovered that I have a never-used Belkin USB-to-PS2
adapter
(not connector) that claims it will connect PS2 mice and keyboards to a
USB
computer and that it "installs with plug-and-play ease" and requires no
drivers or power supply. I'm guessing that it might not work, but I
thought
I'd ask. Could it be that the Belkin adapter is really a connector?

Thank you!

Jo-Anne


The mouse you want to repair is USB.

If you have a PS/2 cable, you'd need to chop the head off it and fit
a USB connector. And they don't make "screw mount" connectors for that
kind of thing, because it would upset signal integrity.

The PS/2 cable itself, might only be designed with PS/2 signals
in mind. Maybe it has a crosstalk problem. We don't know if
all the internal details for the two cables are the same.

I really wouldn't be heading in that direction. It's about as
much work, as designing a mouse from scratch.

Look, if you want to fix it:

1) Buy a USB cable.
2) Chop the non-computer end off, exposing four wires and shield.
3) Solder four wires and shield, to the inside of the mouse.
4) Wrap electrical tape around the wire, to form a crude strain
relief where the cable goes through the mouse casing. Or not.

Done.

Paul



Thank you, Paul!

Jo-Anne


  #12  
Old July 19th 12, 05:26 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
Jo-Anne[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,101
Default USB to PS2 converter

"JJ" wrote in message
...
"Jo-Anne" wrote:

I recently posted about my dead Contour optical mouse, whose
cable had a broken wire--one of five. Given the way the five
wires were crimped into a piece of plastic, it looked like it
would be impossible to fix.

I also, however, have several old PS2 Contour mice whose rollers
had gotten clogged with cat fur. It turns out that some of the
cables have the same five-wire configuration.

I'd like to try connecting the unbroken PS2 cable to the optical
mouse. What sort of USB to PS2 connector will make Windows XP
recognize the mouse as Plug-and-Play? Or is that even possible?

Thank you!


USB mouse/keyboard need USB plug, and PS2 mouse/keyboard need PS2
plug. You can't simply fix it with different plug, or you may
damage your mouse and/or your PC. Replacing the whole mouse is
recommended. Otherwise you'll need a spare USB cable and soldering
skills with basic electronic knowledge.

For USB mouse/keyboard to PS2 converter, and vice-versa. They are
like the ones shown he

http://www.google.com/search?q=%22us...2+converter%22

PS2 mouse/keyboard isn't Plug-and-Play. While Windows can detect
its type, it can't detect its removal (when unplugged) or its
arrival (when plugged).


Thank you, JJ. Time to give up on replacing the cable, I think.

Jo-Anne


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2019 PCbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.