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Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 4th 19, 10:06 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 963
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

Hello all,

I've just tried to use the standard folder - rightclick - search...
putting "@require" in the "Containing text:" box. For some reason it
doesn't really tell me it complains about "The Indexing Service Query cannot
be completed", and than fails to find the search string (its in multiple
files).

I take it the "@" at the start of my search string means something special,
but I have no idea what or how to tell the OS /not/ to try to regard that
"@" (and others?) as such (I've disabled the "Indexing Service" - why is it
trying to invoke it anyway ?). Some ritual chanting perhaps ? Some
secret registry setting ? Maybe a non-mentioned escape character ?

I might be a bit sarcastic in the naming of possible solutions, but
boy-oh-boy, how I hate brain-dead programs ...

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


Ads
  #2  
Old September 4th 19, 10:29 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Apd
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 67
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

"R.Wieser" wrote:

I've just tried to use the standard folder - rightclick - search...
putting "@require" in the "Containing text:" box. For some reason it
doesn't really tell me it complains about "The Indexing Service Query cannot
be completed", and than fails to find the search string (its in multiple
files).

I take it the "@" at the start of my search string means something special,
but I have no idea what or how to tell the OS /not/ to try to regard that
"@" (and others?) as such (I've disabled the "Indexing Service" - why is it
trying to invoke it anyway ?). Some ritual chanting perhaps ? Some
secret registry setting ? Maybe a non-mentioned escape character ?


How very strange - it also happens on Win2k. If you precede it by a
backslash ("\" is often used as an escape char) it works and does not
complain. I also have indexing disabled.


  #3  
Old September 4th 19, 12:53 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 963
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

Apd,

If you precede it by a backslash ("\" is often used as an escape char)
it works


Bummer, it doesn't on XP(sp3). :-\

By the way, it throws the same complaint when using "!" or "#" as the first
char ...

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


  #4  
Old September 4th 19, 04:22 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Apd
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 67
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

"R.Wieser" wrote:
Apd,
If you precede it by a backslash ("\" is often used as an escape char)
it works


Bummer, it doesn't on XP(sp3). :-\


Indeed, I've just tried it.

By the way, it throws the same complaint when using "!" or "#" as the first
char ...


It's as if it detects an advanced query syntax and tries to hand it
to the indexing service. However, while "@" and "#" are mentioned as
special chars in the service, so are some others and they work fine in
a normal search. Perhaps it's a bug.


  #5  
Old September 4th 19, 05:36 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 963
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

Apd,

It's as if it detects an advanced query syntax and tries to
hand it to the indexing service.


Thats my guess to. Even though that service has been disabled (which
should not be /that/ hard to check).

However, while "@" and "#" are mentioned as special
chars in the service,


Documentation which is, afaics, not referred to by the search dialog or its
error messages.

so are some others and they work
fine in a normal search. Perhaps it's a bug.


Perhaps. But all we have is some "Hey, thats wierd ..." observations to go
on in this regard.

Thanks for the response.

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


  #6  
Old September 5th 19, 02:57 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

In message , Apd writes:
"R.Wieser" wrote:
Apd,
If you precede it by a backslash ("\" is often used as an escape char)
it works


Bummer, it doesn't on XP(sp3). :-\


Indeed, I've just tried it.

By the way, it throws the same complaint when using "!" or "#" as the first
char ...


It's as if it detects an advanced query syntax and tries to hand it
to the indexing service. However, while "@" and "#" are mentioned as
special chars in the service, so are some others and they work fine in
a normal search. Perhaps it's a bug.


I know you like to use OS-included facilities, but I have just tried in
"Everything" typing an @, and it's happy with it (told me I have 1,618
objects with an @ in their name). 473 with #. Oddly, ! _does_ seem to
mean something unexpected.

I think versions of Everything that work under XP are still available -
and I think there is a portable version, if you want to use it on
customers' machines.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Speed has never killed anyone. Suddenly becoming stationary, that's what gets
you. - Jeremy Clarkson, Top Gear
  #7  
Old September 5th 19, 05:14 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 963
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

John,

I know you like to use OS-included facilities


Its more that I'm not really in to throwing all kinds of programs at my
puter, and than get stuck with all kinds of crap when I don't like (or
really need) it and uninstall it (stability of the OS comes to mind).

but I have just tried in "Everything" typing an @, and it's happy with it


I've just did a google for it, and it looks like it only works on filesnames
(not contents) ?

Windows search also works fine when I look for filenames. The problem
occurred when I tried so search for text inside (html) files.

I think versions of Everything that work under XP are still available -
and I think there is a portable version


I /do/ like portable versions, if only because they (hopefully) do not leave
all kinds of stuff behind (in system folders and /or registry). :-)

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


  #8  
Old September 5th 19, 08:41 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

In message , R.Wieser
writes:
John,

I know you like to use OS-included facilities


Its more that I'm not really in to throwing all kinds of programs at my
puter, and than get stuck with all kinds of crap when I don't like (or
really need) it and uninstall it (stability of the OS comes to mind).


Everything is well-behaved.

but I have just tried in "Everything" typing an @, and it's happy with it


I've just did a google for it, and it looks like it only works on filesnames
(not contents) ?


Correct. At that, it's without equal. For content search, most people
here seem to like Agent Ransack. I've tried it, and found it works OK -
can't speak for its manners nor how it compares to other similar, as I
probably do a content search less than once a year (and want to, maybe
ten or twelve).

Windows search also works fine when I look for filenames. The problem
occurred when I tried so search for text inside (html) files.


I think you can specify filters in Agent Ransack.

I think versions of Everything that work under XP are still available -
and I think there is a portable version


I /do/ like portable versions, if only because they (hopefully) do not leave
all kinds of stuff behind (in system folders and /or registry). :-)


Agreed. I think the registry is about the worst idea that occurred to
anyone in Windows. It had its uses for common settings (though even
there IMO there are better ways), but for use for individual prog.s, I
don't like it.

I don't know if Agent Ransack has a portable version; someone'll be
along in a moment to say.

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Heaven forbid today's audience should feel bombarded with information or
worse, lectured. Dont'scare the horses by waving facts around.
- David Butcher, RT 2014/11/29-12/5
  #9  
Old September 6th 19, 07:51 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 963
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

John,

I've just did a google for it, and it looks like it only works on
filesnames (not contents) ?


Correct. At that, it's without equal.


And here I am, at times using "dir /s/b {filemask}" because I think its
sometimes better (as it doesn't search /inside/ zipfiles) :-)

I think you can specify filters in Agent Ransack.


I might take a look at it, if only because "search" only looks inside files
it /knows/ are textfiles - but doesn't make clear how it determines that.
In other words: Makes it easy to miss possible hits.

Ofcourse, I've also got a windows port of "grep" handy (1989), which allows
me to search inside any file. It just complains when it cannot make text
head-or-tails from it. :-)

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


  #10  
Old September 6th 19, 11:30 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

In message , R.Wieser
writes:
John,

I've just did a google for it, and it looks like it only works on
filesnames (not contents) ?


Correct. At that, it's without equal.


And here I am, at times using "dir /s/b {filemask}" because I think its
sometimes better (as it doesn't search /inside/ zipfiles) :-)


(I can't remember if "Everything" looks inside those. I don't _think_ it
does.) Do give "Everything" a try; it's well-behaved, powerful (e. g.
you can sort search results by size or creation date, both of which I've
found useful), and blisteringly fast - granted, I tend to leave it open,
but I've often found what I want with it literally in the time you'd be
typing the "dir /s/b" part.

I think you can specify filters in Agent Ransack.


I might take a look at it, if only because "search" only looks inside files
it /knows/ are textfiles - but doesn't make clear how it determines that.
In other words: Makes it easy to miss possible hits.

Ofcourse, I've also got a windows port of "grep" handy (1989), which allows
me to search inside any file. It just complains when it cannot make text
head-or-tails from it. :-)


I too used UNIX back in the day, before Linux (before Linus was born?
No, just checked at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Torvalds, and
he's 1969). Happy days ...

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never be led astray onto the path of virtue.
  #11  
Old September 6th 19, 05:16 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,958
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a"Indexing service query" not being active.

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , R.Wieser
writes:
John,

I've just did a google for it, and it looks like it only works on
filesnames (not contents) ?

Correct. At that, it's without equal.


And here I am, at times using "dir /s/b {filemask}" because I think its
sometimes better (as it doesn't search /inside/ zipfiles) :-)


(I can't remember if "Everything" looks inside those. I don't _think_ it
does.) Do give "Everything" a try; it's well-behaved, powerful (e. g.
you can sort search results by size or creation date, both of which I've
found useful), and blisteringly fast - granted, I tend to leave it open,
but I've often found what I want with it literally in the time you'd be
typing the "dir /s/b" part.

I think you can specify filters in Agent Ransack.


I might take a look at it, if only because "search" only looks inside
files
it /knows/ are textfiles - but doesn't make clear how it determines that.
In other words: Makes it easy to miss possible hits.

Ofcourse, I've also got a windows port of "grep" handy (1989), which
allows
me to search inside any file. It just complains when it cannot make text
head-or-tails from it. :-)


I too used UNIX back in the day, before Linux (before Linus was born?
No, just checked at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Torvalds, and
he's 1969). Happy days ...

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


John


Windows has zipfldr and cabfiles capabilities.

An inverted index can do anything you might want, as long
as it has "search providers" for such formats. (Like, a MSWD
inside a ZIP, might need a copy of Word to cough up a "search
provider" or something. Otherwise, the default encryption
might "protect" the content from indexing.)

Agent Ransack doesn't look inside ZIP files. Their File Locator Pro
probably has more features than the free version.

Everything.exe is only a filename search utility, and it
revels in reading the $MFT. This does not suggest
a ZIP file or CAB file capability.

Grep is relatively useless, because it won't be looking
for both 8 bit (narrow) and 16 bit (Windows wide) characters.
The choices Windows 10 makes when saving text files, is not
helping matters.

You can miss a lot if you're not careful with search.

For specialized searches, I've written simple programs in C
to get what I want. You really can't trust any utility until
you've tested it to satisfaction. They've not all been modified
for all the character set options.

Paul
  #12  
Old September 8th 19, 08:11 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 963
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a "Indexing service query" not being active.

Paul,

Windows has zipfldr and cabfiles capabilities.


Yep. Which you can't tell "search" to ignore (or /only/ look in) ... :-(

An inverted index can do anything you might want,


I always had my doubts about such indices being able to capture all
character combinations in a searchable way - without bellowing out I mean.
I do sometimes have the need to search for partial words. Pretty much
also why I disabled the indexing service.

as long as it has "search providers" for such formats.


Due to that description overlapping with "internet search providers" it
seems to be hard to find anything about it. Do you perhaps have any other
name for me (from the registry perhaps) ? Not that I currently would want
to create one myself mind you, but just so I can have a look at them (read:
curiosity, plain and simple).

Grep is relatively useless, because it won't be looking
for both 8 bit (narrow) and 16 bit (Windows wide) characters.


:-) I'm rather old fashioned, and do not believe I should save a file in
ginormous (and complex!) format when a simple ASCII save will do as well (I
do not really believe in a lot of markup anyway). To be honest, I do not
even have a program like the "Word" text-editor installed, as I seem to do
fine with 'simple' ASCII editors. Heck, I do not even view/edit textfiles
in Write unless the file gets to big for Notepad.

In other words, grep works fine for most files files I saved myself (which
is most of them).

You can miss a lot if you're not careful with search.


Yup. Though for simple text-based searches its not too bad. Though even
there it has got its gotchas. With this threads starting reason as a
(luckely!) obvious one. :-(

For specialized searches, I've written simple programs in C
to get what I want.


Similar here. Though I early on recognised that doing wide-string (let
alone multi-byte) searches is rather difficult, with several codepoints
mapping to the same displayed symbol (and no clear indication that they do).
I therefore resigned myself to ony look for "two byte ASCII" (high byte
always zero).

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


  #13  
Old September 8th 19, 05:04 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,958
Default Searching for files containing "@require" - compaint about a"Indexing service query" not being active.

R.Wieser wrote:
Paul,

as long as it has "search providers" for such formats.


Due to that description overlapping with "internet search providers" it
seems to be hard to find anything about it. Do you perhaps have any other
name for me (from the registry perhaps) ? Not that I currently would want
to create one myself mind you, but just so I can have a look at them (read:
curiosity, plain and simple).


They chose to call it an iFilter here. Acrobat Reader is known
to provide a file doing things like that.

http://www.documentsnap.com/how-to-f...dows-7-64-bit/

In some cases, the COM interface is used instead.
Say an email tool stores messages in a custom database
format. The search indexer "doesn't like binary" and
won't munch on that directly. However, an email tool
can have a COM interface, "pulling one .mbx at a time",
and this affords a way to pull text messages one
at a time, which the indexer can use. In the outlook
articles, there is a registry setting to enable
indexing email, which could be using such a method.

The technique in the modern OSes may be called "federated search",
but that does not appear to be a very good search term either.
The Google results are easily diluted by the need to "sell socks".

A search provider, is a mechanism for converting a proprietary
format, into a format the indexer can use. I guess "filter" is
as good a term as any.

Around Acrobat Reader three or four or so, the Reader actually
had an inverted search index capability and could index all the
PDFs and put them into the one index file for search. Like the
windows.edb on Windows Search, this can be slow when the database
gets large, and the updater tries to "merge" an index into
the main index. It's very time consuming, and doesn't scale
particularly well. My Acrobat attempts kept breaking so I
gave up on using the indexing feature. And this means, since
Adobe built this for their own usage, eons ago, designing
an iFilter is old hat for them.

Paul
 




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