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A screen question.



 
 
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  #121  
Old September 13th 19, 10:53 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion
Ken Springer[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,396
Default A screen question.

On 9/13/19 11:06 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
On 2019-09-13 10:08 a.m., Ken Springer wrote:
On 9/13/19 8:48 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
On 2019-09-13 7:59 a.m., Ken Springer wrote:
On 9/13/19 2:30 AM, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Ken Springer
writes:
On 9/12/19 7:57 AM, Jonathan N. Little wrote:
BTW 16:9 aspect is not 1920X1200 but 1920X1080

This is what is puzzling to me.

If the monitor's aspect ratio is 16:9, why does Rene's list of
optional
screen resolutions have 3 resolutions that are 16:10 aspect ratios?

I have 2 monitors with 16:10 aspect ratios.┬* One attached to W10
(1903)
system, the other Mac Mojave.

Neither system offers me a 1440X900 option, even though that is a
16:10
aspect ratio.

It's quite the conundrum.

Maybe, with the native resolution of the monitors in question, that one
gives a blurring result that is _particularly_ obnoxious (maybe even to
VH folk) - _very_ visible blobs, or something?

The native resolution of my monitors are not in question.┬* The are
16:10.

It's Rene's that puzzles me.┬* It's listed on Asus's site at 16:9, yet 3
of the resolutions in his list are 16:10 resolutions.┬* At the same time,
he did not list 1600:900, which Mark Lloyd suggested he try, which I
*think* he is now using.

So now I'm, in parallel, digging into my Mac options, and the options
there for resolutions are so much smaller.┬* I think, to some extent, the
options offered may depend on the video inputs the monitor has.┬* The
monitor on the Mac has HDMI, but on the Windows computers, no HDMI.



Yes Ken, I am using the 1600x900 and it really is great with this 27
inch monitor.


So, we made things better for you, even with all our fumbling around???
┬*LOL┬* But, you've confirmed what I thought would happen when you
correctly play with the settings available to the user.┬* I think this is
one area where I'll have to say that W10 is now superior to everything
else I've checked.

Would you double check your available resolutions list for me?┬* For me,
this is one of those things that I just have to find the answer for...
Why your system offers resolutions that the monitor should not have.



Yep, here is the list again, this time with my eyes open.

1920x1080
1680x1050
1600x1200
1600x900
1440x900
1280x1024
1280x960
1280x720
1152x872
1152x864
1024x768
800x600
Fresh off the monitor. :-)


Thanks, Rene. This subthread has added 4 new resolutions I didn't have
before.


--
Ken
MacOS 10.14.5
Firefox 67.0.4
Thunderbird 60.7
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
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  #122  
Old September 14th 19, 02:56 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,286
Default A screen question.

"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote:

The original poster Peter Jason didn't say he only had [astigmatism]
in one eye.


Are your palm prints exactly the same for your right hand as for your
left hand? Nope. Same for your right and left fingerprints for the
matching fingers. Same for your eyes. Irregularities in the shape of
the cornea that generate refractive error (astigmatism) do not progress
equally in both eyes because the tissues are separate, not common. Many
folks with astigmatism have it in only one eye. While astigmatism
usually occurs concurrently in both eyes (bilateral), it is not
necessarily equal in both eyes (i.e., it can be asymmetrical).
Astigmatism in only one eye is often caused by injury (which is my case
due to a cat scratching my right eye when I was a kid) or by
degenerative eye conditions or disease; however, eyes do not degenerate
equally. No pair of disconnected tissue will degenerate equally.

Regardless of astigmatism, how often do eyeglass wearers get exactly the
same prescription for both eyes? Most users don't even know the specs
for their specs; that is, they go to the optometrist, get their exam,
and get their eyeglasses, and the bill they get never mentions the
sphere, cylinder, and axis measurements. If they want to keep their own
history of how their eyesight has degenerated, they have to ask for a
copy of the measurements to know what they are. Several times when I've
asked for the specs, they'd look mildly surpised and asked "Why do you
need to know?". I'd respond "Why shouldn't I know?"

In any case, for a monitor to correct vision impairment would mean the
screen would need to place a lens at your face to correct the refractive
error at the distance for where the pixels are painted. Don't know
about you, but having a large bubble of glass protrude from the monitor
against which I would have to press my face seems extreme compared to
putting on a pair of eyeglasses.

Remember the function of the lens is to correct your focus at a specific
distance. My eyeglasses for outside and driving would be impossible to
use for reading or the computer monitor, so I use prescription
eyeglasses for reading and computer. Likewise, my reading eyeglasses
would make everything slightly out of focus at distances. I did this
once when I went to a reunion and wore the wrong eyeglasses. They look
almost identical. I was wondering why my vision suddenly got so bad
beyond my arm's length. I don't like bifocals. I get a sore neck
tilting back my head to use the bottom lens portion for computer monitor
viewing.
  #123  
Old September 14th 19, 03:25 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion
Rene Lamontagne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,037
Default A screen question.

On 2019-09-14 8:56 a.m., VanguardLH wrote:
"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote:

The original poster Peter Jason didn't say he only had [astigmatism]
in one eye.


Are your palm prints exactly the same for your right hand as for your
left hand? Nope. Same for your right and left fingerprints for the
matching fingers. Same for your eyes. Irregularities in the shape of
the cornea that generate refractive error (astigmatism) do not progress
equally in both eyes because the tissues are separate, not common. Many
folks with astigmatism have it in only one eye. While astigmatism
usually occurs concurrently in both eyes (bilateral), it is not
necessarily equal in both eyes (i.e., it can be asymmetrical).
Astigmatism in only one eye is often caused by injury (which is my case
due to a cat scratching my right eye when I was a kid) or by
degenerative eye conditions or disease; however, eyes do not degenerate
equally. No pair of disconnected tissue will degenerate equally.

Regardless of astigmatism, how often do eyeglass wearers get exactly the
same prescription for both eyes? Most users don't even know the specs
for their specs; that is, they go to the optometrist, get their exam,
and get their eyeglasses, and the bill they get never mentions the
sphere, cylinder, and axis measurements. If they want to keep their own
history of how their eyesight has degenerated, they have to ask for a
copy of the measurements to know what they are. Several times when I've
asked for the specs, they'd look mildly surpised and asked "Why do you
need to know?". I'd respond "Why shouldn't I know?"

In any case, for a monitor to correct vision impairment would mean the
screen would need to place a lens at your face to correct the refractive
error at the distance for where the pixels are painted. Don't know
about you, but having a large bubble of glass protrude from the monitor
against which I would have to press my face seems extreme compared to
putting on a pair of eyeglasses.

Remember the function of the lens is to correct your focus at a specific
distance. My eyeglasses for outside and driving would be impossible to
use for reading or the computer monitor, so I use prescription
eyeglasses for reading and computer. Likewise, my reading eyeglasses
would make everything slightly out of focus at distances. I did this
once when I went to a reunion and wore the wrong eyeglasses. They look
almost identical. I was wondering why my vision suddenly got so bad
beyond my arm's length. I don't like bifocals. I get a sore neck
tilting back my head to use the bottom lens portion for computer monitor
viewing.


I am in the same boat regards sore neck syndrome, especially reading the
top of the display, my bifocals are +9.
My ophthalmologist always gives me a copy of the Specs and also sends a
copy to my medical Doctor.

Rene


  #124  
Old September 14th 19, 04:40 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 157
Default A screen question.

In message , VanguardLH
writes:
"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote:

The original poster Peter Jason didn't say he only had [astigmatism]
in one eye.


Are your palm prints exactly the same for your right hand as for your
left hand? Nope. Same for your right and left fingerprints for the
matching fingers. Same for your eyes. Irregularities in the shape of
the cornea that generate refractive error (astigmatism) do not progress
equally in both eyes because the tissues are separate, not common. Many
folks with astigmatism have it in only one eye. While astigmatism
usually occurs concurrently in both eyes (bilateral), it is not
necessarily equal in both eyes (i.e., it can be asymmetrical).
Astigmatism in only one eye is often caused by injury (which is my case
due to a cat scratching my right eye when I was a kid) or by
degenerative eye conditions or disease; however, eyes do not degenerate
equally. No pair of disconnected tissue will degenerate equally.


Like you (though for different reason - mine's from birth), I have
dissimilar eyes (to the extent that I don't have 3D vision; both eyes
worked fine when I was younger, but my brain never developed the ability
to use both images at once). I will admit I'd got used to thinking
_most_ other people had eyes that were more similar than mine are.

Regardless of astigmatism, how often do eyeglass wearers get exactly the
same prescription for both eyes? Most users don't even know the specs
for their specs; that is, they go to the optometrist, get their exam,
and get their eyeglasses, and the bill they get never mentions the


That's _probably_ still true here (UK), but less so: several of our
optometry chains offer free eye tests as a marketing exercise from time
to time, and also certain classes (children below a certain age,
pensioners above one, and I think those on certain kinds of benefit
[welfare]) are entitled to free ones too. So the more savvy of us - or,
even those entitled to free glasses as well as tests, but who don't like
the options (frames, coatings, ...) offered at a particular branch - go
for a free test, then take the prescription elsewhere.

sphere, cylinder, and axis measurements. If they want to keep their own


One that's often left off the card is intraocular distance, i. e. how
far apart your pupils are.

history of how their eyesight has degenerated, they have to ask for a
copy of the measurements to know what they are. Several times when I've
asked for the specs, they'd look mildly surpised and asked "Why do you
need to know?". I'd respond "Why shouldn't I know?"


Indeed!

In any case, for a monitor to correct vision impairment would mean the
screen would need to place a lens at your face to correct the refractive
error at the distance for where the pixels are painted. Don't know
about you, but having a large bubble of glass protrude from the monitor
against which I would have to press my face seems extreme compared to
putting on a pair of eyeglasses.


With the one exception of the sort of astigmatism that is purely an
aspect ratio distortion, and similar in both eyes. A monitor and
graphics card combination _could_ sort that, by simply using the "wrong"
ratio - _if_ a ratio "error" that countermatched the astigmatism was
achievable (including by rotating the monitor if necessary). _Maybe_
that type of astigmatism is actually very rare; I don't know. I based my
na´ve thoughts on the matter on being told (decades ago) that the reason
some famous painters painted pictures of a stretched world (e. g. tall
thin people) was that they had astigmatism. (I was always suspicious of
that explanation, because surely if they had, and looked at a picture
they'd painted in that manner, it'd still look wrong to them.)

Remember the function of the lens is to correct your focus at a specific


One function ...

distance. My eyeglasses for outside and driving would be impossible to


.... and for most practical glasses, for a _range_ of distances - though
ones for specific occupations, including display screen use, may be
optimised for quite a narrow range.
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

As for cooking, what a bore that is. It's such a faff, thinking of what to
have, buying it and cooking it and clearing up, then all you do is eat it -
and have to start all over again next day. Hunter Davies, RT 2017/2/4-10
 




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