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WiFi Indulgence



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 31st 19, 04:01 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Wiffer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default WiFi Indulgence

WiFi Indulgence

I have switched Internet providers to Spectrum.
They provided a modem (with phone support) and a separate wifi router
(at my request two boxes, no extra charge to do so but $5/mo for the
wifi router. Acceptable to me.). Tests out at 100Mb/sec. But their
wifi router is not all that fast internally and signal strength is just
barely adequate in my front room. So ...

I have a cat5 wire running from this WiFi Router located in the back
room to the front room. There I have a switch to allow connections to
the TV and other devices. I only want to use the wifi on devices that
are not close to or able to use a wired connection.

Before all of this I purchased an access point and also a supposed high
power internally fast wifi router. Both on hand in the box unopened.

The access point is not the same brand as the Spectrum WiFi router if
that matters.

Now the questions:
If I connect the access point to the cat5 in the front room can I use it
? What do I need to do to set it up ? Will it have the same SSID ?

OR

If I connect the fast wifi router to the cat5 in the front room can I
use it ? What way would I set this up ?

To set it up I need to isolate it from my LAN and plug directly into a
laptop to adjust the SSID etc, correct ?

The following I really do not know how to do I am just repeating the
high level stuff I heard about. So I may be back for more detailed
instructions.

a) plug it in and use the SSID and password as exists in the fast wifi
router. i.e. use a different SSID that the Spectrum setup.

b) redo whatever needs redoing in the fast wifi router and the spectrum
wifi router to get the same SSID and password ?
What do I need to do ? Block certain IPs on the Spectrum and block the
Spectrum used IPs on the fast router ? What else ?

Really I am asking what is the best solution to get wifi in the front
room that is a strong signal ? I have three wifi security cameras there
that I want active.

Thank you in advance.

Ads
  #2  
Old May 31st 19, 04:39 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,828
Default WiFi Indulgence

On Fri, 31 May 2019 08:01:25 -0700, Wiffer
wrote:


Posted to 4 Windows groups? Seems excessive...


WiFi Indulgence

I have switched Internet providers to Spectrum.
They provided a modem (with phone support) and a separate wifi router
(at my request two boxes, no extra charge to do so but $5/mo for the
wifi router. Acceptable to me.). Tests out at 100Mb/sec. But their
wifi router is not all that fast internally and signal strength is just
barely adequate in my front room. So ...

I have a cat5 wire running from this WiFi Router located in the back
room to the front room. There I have a switch to allow connections to
the TV and other devices. I only want to use the wifi on devices that
are not close to or able to use a wired connection.

Before all of this I purchased an access point and also a supposed high
power internally fast wifi router. Both on hand in the box unopened.


Sounds like you want an access point in the front room. My choice would
be to use your WiFi router for that purpose and return the dedicated
access point. A WiFi router can fill multiple roles, while an access
point is usually just an access point (while usually costing more).

The access point is not the same brand as the Spectrum WiFi router if
that matters.


Doesn't matter.

Now the questions:
If I connect the access point to the cat5 in the front room can I use it
? What do I need to do to set it up ? Will it have the same SSID ?


If you decide to use the access point, you'll need to check to see what
its IP address is. You'll need to make sure it doesn't conflict with
anything already on your LAN, and obviously you'll need to make sure it
has an address on your LAN. If it's in a different subnet or it has a
conflicting address, you'll need to change it. Use an address that's
outside of your current DHCP scope, if applicable.

You'd connect the access point to a port on your current switch. You'll
either use its default SSID, a totally new SSID, or the same SSID as
your existing WiFi router. There are pros and cons to each scenario, but
all three will 'work'. Be sure to set the proper security protocol (at
least WPA2) and WiFi password. Note that the WiFi password is not the
same thing as the administration password.

OR

If I connect the fast wifi router to the cat5 in the front room can I
use it ? What way would I set this up ?


That would be my choice. You'd log into the router first and set its IP
address as described above. You'd disable DHCP, since you don't want
this device to hand out IP addresses. You'd set the SSID as described
above, as well as the security protocol and password. Once configured,
you'd connect an Ethernet cable from your existing switch to a LAN port
on the WiFi router. Leave the WAN port unused.

To set it up I need to isolate it from my LAN and plug directly into a
laptop to adjust the SSID etc, correct ?


Correct, and if it has a default address that's on a different subnet,
you can let its DHCP server assign an IP address to the laptop, but
you'll be disabling DHCP once you connect. If you need to change its LAN
admin IP address, be prepared to manually change your laptop's IP
address to once again be in the same subnet. You'll temporarily lose
your connection until you update your laptop's address.

Really I am asking what is the best solution to get wifi in the front
room that is a strong signal ? I have three wifi security cameras there
that I want active.


Are they motion sensing or always on? If always on, that's a lot of
wireless data being flung into the air. Pay close attention to which
WiFi band (2.4GHz vs 5GHz) and which channel(s) you're using.


  #3  
Old May 31st 19, 04:52 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
😉 Good Guy 😉
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 533
Default WiFi Indulgence

On 31/05/2019 16:01, Wiffer wrote:
WiFi Indulgence


Hey Nutter,

You forgot to cross-post to "misc.survivalism" where you'll find the
answers to your questions because of your low intelligence.


Path: aioe.org!goblin3!goblin.stu.neva.ru!news.netfront. net!.POSTED.107.184.178.24!not-for-mail
From: Wiffer
Newsgroups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.ge neral,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Subject: WiFi Indulgence
Date: Fri, 31 May 2019 08:01:25 -0700
Organization: Netfront http://www.netfront.net/
Message-ID:
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Injection-Date: Fri, 31 May 2019 15:01:31 -0000 (UTC)
Injection-Info: adenine.netfront.net; posting-host="107.184.178.24";
logging-data="32068"; "
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 5.1; rv:49.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/49.0
SeaMonkey/2.46
X-Mozilla-News-Host: news://freenews.netfront.net:119
Xref: aioe.org microsoft.public.windowsxp.general:152790 alt.windows7.general:43092 alt.comp.os.windows-8:30623 alt.comp.os.windows-10:92434



--
With over 950 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.

  #4  
Old May 31st 19, 05:02 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default WiFi Indulgence

In article , Wiffer
wrote:

WiFi Indulgence

I have switched Internet providers to Spectrum.
They provided a modem (with phone support) and a separate wifi router
(at my request two boxes, no extra charge to do so but $5/mo for the
wifi router. Acceptable to me.). Tests out at 100Mb/sec. But their
wifi router is not all that fast internally and signal strength is just
barely adequate in my front room. So ...





Really I am asking what is the best solution to get wifi in the front
room that is a strong signal ? I have three wifi security cameras there
that I want active.


the best solution not use the isp provided wifi access point at all and
instead use a single mesh system for the entire house. put nodes
wherever you want the best signal, including in a window if you want to
cover the front or back yards. you will then be able to move around
from room to room or even outside, while your devices seamlessly hand
off between nodes as needed. it's easy to set up and use. the downside
is that mesh systems can be a bit expensive.

another option, depending on the layout and design of your house as
well as cabling preferences, a single centrally located wifi access
point that's cabled back to the isp's modem might also work.

trying to get the isp's wifi access point to work with a second one
from a completely different manufacturer without any issues is not
going to be a fun experience, nor will it result in a particularly good
setup.
  #5  
Old May 31st 19, 05:35 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,828
Default WiFi Indulgence

On Fri, 31 May 2019 12:02:50 -0400, nospam
wrote:

In article , Wiffer
wrote:

WiFi Indulgence

I have switched Internet providers to Spectrum.
They provided a modem (with phone support) and a separate wifi router
(at my request two boxes, no extra charge to do so but $5/mo for the
wifi router. Acceptable to me.). Tests out at 100Mb/sec. But their
wifi router is not all that fast internally and signal strength is just
barely adequate in my front room. So ...





Really I am asking what is the best solution to get wifi in the front
room that is a strong signal ? I have three wifi security cameras there
that I want active.


the best solution not use the isp provided wifi access point at all and
instead use a single mesh system for the entire house. put nodes
wherever you want the best signal, including in a window if you want to
cover the front or back yards. you will then be able to move around
from room to room or even outside, while your devices seamlessly hand
off between nodes as needed. it's easy to set up and use. the downside
is that mesh systems can be a bit expensive.


I read a bunch of mesh reviews recently and came away with the distinct
impression that this technology needs to mature a bit more. Poor
performance (low throughput, high latency) seemed to be fairly common. I
like the concept, but it doesn't seem to be ready. Do you any specific
examples that you like? I'd like to go back for a second look.

another option, depending on the layout and design of your house as
well as cabling preferences, a single centrally located wifi access
point that's cabled back to the isp's modem might also work.

trying to get the isp's wifi access point to work with a second one
from a completely different manufacturer without any issues is not
going to be a fun experience, nor will it result in a particularly good
setup.


Other than the very latest, possibly beta, stuff, WiFi standards are
well baked. I've not seen any interoperability issues in forever. It's a
non-issue.

  #6  
Old May 31st 19, 06:51 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default WiFi Indulgence

In article , Char Jackson
wrote:


Really I am asking what is the best solution to get wifi in the front
room that is a strong signal ? I have three wifi security cameras there
that I want active.


the best solution not use the isp provided wifi access point at all and
instead use a single mesh system for the entire house. put nodes
wherever you want the best signal, including in a window if you want to
cover the front or back yards. you will then be able to move around
from room to room or even outside, while your devices seamlessly hand
off between nodes as needed. it's easy to set up and use. the downside
is that mesh systems can be a bit expensive.


I read a bunch of mesh reviews recently and came away with the distinct
impression that this technology needs to mature a bit more. Poor
performance (low throughput, high latency) seemed to be fairly common. I
like the concept, but it doesn't seem to be ready. Do you any specific
examples that you like? I'd like to go back for a second look.


i don't know what you've read, but like anything, mesh systems range
from good to bad and everywhere in between. also, things change
quickly, so what might have been a not great version 1 is a good
version 2 (and in some cases, the opposite).

most mesh systems use a dedicated 5ghz backhaul, separate from the 5ghz
for devices, so there should be little to no impact on bandwidth or
latency. the ones that don't have a dedicated backhaul are generally
not good.

personally, i like synology, which can work standalone or mesh. that
means it's a few more steps to link secondary units than a dedicated
mesh system (nothing complex, just link them), but it also means that
it's not required. either way, it's a *very* capable and feature packed
router.

another option, depending on the layout and design of your house as
well as cabling preferences, a single centrally located wifi access
point that's cabled back to the isp's modem might also work.

trying to get the isp's wifi access point to work with a second one
from a completely different manufacturer without any issues is not
going to be a fun experience, nor will it result in a particularly good
setup.


Other than the very latest, possibly beta, stuff, WiFi standards are
well baked. I've not seen any interoperability issues in forever. It's a
non-issue.


setting up a single ssid using multiple access points from different
manufacturers, especially using both 2.4 *and* 5ghz bands, rarely works
well, or at all, and can even be an issue with the same company in some
cases.

having all the same make also means there is no blame game should there
be a need for support.
  #7  
Old May 31st 19, 07:15 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
pjp[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,165
Default WiFi Indulgence

In article ,
says...

WiFi Indulgence

I have switched Internet providers to Spectrum.
They provided a modem (with phone support) and a separate wifi router
(at my request two boxes, no extra charge to do so but $5/mo for the
wifi router. Acceptable to me.). Tests out at 100Mb/sec. But their
wifi router is not all that fast internally and signal strength is just
barely adequate in my front room. So ...

I have a cat5 wire running from this WiFi Router located in the back
room to the front room. There I have a switch to allow connections to
the TV and other devices. I only want to use the wifi on devices that
are not close to or able to use a wired connection.

Before all of this I purchased an access point and also a supposed high
power internally fast wifi router. Both on hand in the box unopened.

The access point is not the same brand as the Spectrum WiFi router if
that matters.

Now the questions:
If I connect the access point to the cat5 in the front room can I use it
? What do I need to do to set it up ? Will it have the same SSID ?

OR

If I connect the fast wifi router to the cat5 in the front room can I
use it ? What way would I set this up ?

To set it up I need to isolate it from my LAN and plug directly into a
laptop to adjust the SSID etc, correct ?

The following I really do not know how to do I am just repeating the
high level stuff I heard about. So I may be back for more detailed
instructions.

a) plug it in and use the SSID and password as exists in the fast wifi
router. i.e. use a different SSID that the Spectrum setup.

b) redo whatever needs redoing in the fast wifi router and the spectrum
wifi router to get the same SSID and password ?
What do I need to do ? Block certain IPs on the Spectrum and block the
Spectrum used IPs on the fast router ? What else ?

Really I am asking what is the best solution to get wifi in the front
room that is a strong signal ? I have three wifi security cameras there
that I want active.

Thank you in advance.


I once did almost exact same thing. Main router with incoming signal is
in basement wouldn't give string enough signal to sunporch on opposite
side of house. I have a cable runs from main router to the sunporch. I
dummied down a second router I had. Turned Off DHCP etc. and left only
the wireless live. I gave it a different SID then the main router so I
could tell them apart when viewing wireless connections. I also set it's
IP to range outside first routers DHCP range, e.g. 192.168.1.101. I then
hardwired in the pc connected to stereo, xbox and IP camera which left
one port open on dummied down router for whatever I wanted to connect to
it. It worked fine. In most of house you could view wireless connections
nd decide which was stronger to use.

I have a new router now with stronger signal so I removed 2nd router and
replaced it with an 8-port switch.
  #8  
Old June 1st 19, 12:42 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,828
Default WiFi Indulgence

On Fri, 31 May 2019 13:51:45 -0400, nospam
wrote:

In article , Char Jackson
wrote:

most mesh systems use a dedicated 5ghz backhaul, separate from the 5ghz
for devices, so there should be little to no impact on bandwidth or
latency. the ones that don't have a dedicated backhaul are generally
not good.

personally, i like synology, which can work standalone or mesh. that
means it's a few more steps to link secondary units than a dedicated
mesh system (nothing complex, just link them), but it also means that
it's not required. either way, it's a *very* capable and feature packed
router.


Thanks, I'll take another look at reviews of the technology, especially
Synology.

setting up a single ssid using multiple access points from different
manufacturers, especially using both 2.4 *and* 5ghz bands, rarely works
well, or at all, and can even be an issue with the same company in some
cases.


You're obviously using some undisclosed criteria when making that claim
so if I declare it to be nonsense, which it is, you'll disclose the
additional criteria which perhaps makes it true to some degree, in some
edge case. I don't enjoy playing that game.

Bottom line is that most of the WiFi spec is well baked, and Ethernet is
fully baked. There are no interop issues and there haven't been for over
two decades. I've set up many dozens of systems myself and my colleagues
have set up many hundreds more, all with zero interop issues. Anecdotal,
yes. Here in the newsgroups that I subscribe to, I've *never* seen
anyone reporting interop issues. Likewise for the networking websites
that I keep an eye on.

Whatever problem(s) you've had may have been of your own making, or
perhaps due to defective equipment. It helps to know how to troubleshoot
it.

having all the same make also means there is no blame game should there
be a need for support.


Another non-issue.

  #10  
Old June 1st 19, 12:09 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default WiFi Indulgence

In article , Char Jackson
wrote:

most mesh systems use a dedicated 5ghz backhaul, separate from the 5ghz
for devices, so there should be little to no impact on bandwidth or
latency. the ones that don't have a dedicated backhaul are generally
not good.

personally, i like synology, which can work standalone or mesh. that
means it's a few more steps to link secondary units than a dedicated
mesh system (nothing complex, just link them), but it also means that
it's not required. either way, it's a *very* capable and feature packed
router.


Thanks, I'll take another look at reviews of the technology, especially
Synology.


both the 2600 and 2200 can work as mesh or standalone, plus synology's
user interface is a big step up from the usual webui crap that everyone
else uses. the 1900 is decent by itself, but it won't do mesh.

setting up a single ssid using multiple access points from different
manufacturers, especially using both 2.4 *and* 5ghz bands, rarely works
well, or at all, and can even be an issue with the same company in some
cases.


You're obviously using some undisclosed criteria when making that claim
so if I declare it to be nonsense, which it is, you'll disclose the
additional criteria which perhaps makes it true to some degree, in some
edge case. I don't enjoy playing that game.


the criteria is that it's less work if everything is from the same
company, especially if they directly support what you're trying to do.

simple example: if one router supports 2.4 & 5ghz with the same ssid
and the other does not, you're going to have a bitch of a time to get
it all working.

Bottom line is that most of the WiFi spec is well baked, and Ethernet is
fully baked. There are no interop issues and there haven't been for over
two decades. I've set up many dozens of systems myself and my colleagues
have set up many hundreds more, all with zero interop issues. Anecdotal,
yes. Here in the newsgroups that I subscribe to, I've *never* seen
anyone reporting interop issues. Likewise for the networking websites
that I keep an eye on.


just because you haven't had problems doesn't mean nobody else will.

Whatever problem(s) you've had may have been of your own making, or
perhaps due to defective equipment. It helps to know how to troubleshoot
it.


nope, and i do.

having all the same make also means there is no blame game should there
be a need for support.


Another non-issue.


it can be for a lot of people.
  #11  
Old June 1st 19, 12:09 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default WiFi Indulgence

In article ,
Jason wrote:

I would suggest to the OP that he purchase a decent modem
that's on the Spectrum list of approved models. The
monthly rental for Spectrum's will cover the cost of a
much better one in less than a year. Check out mid-priced
Motorola models. I'm very happy with mine.


that too.
 




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