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Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 10th 18, 10:58 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
David E. Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 960
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

I have Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64. I can verify that I at least have
some variety of Windows 7 by various installed applications. These
include:
* Belarc Advisor from http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html.
* ProduKey from http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html
* Windows Update (showing an update that I have not yet installed)
* Computer (both the Properties when I right-click on the icon and the
display when I select [Help About Windows] in the open window)

However, I cannot install updates to two applications whose Web pages
indicate they are compatible with Windows 7. Both throw up error popups
claiming my Windows version is not compatible. These a
* Thunderbird 60.0 (update from 52.9.1)
* Skype 8.27.0.85 (update from 7.36.0.150)
Note: I attempted to install these from complete downloaded installer
files. I disabled my Internet connection and my anti-virus application
AFTER downloading and scanning the files.

What is going on here? Is there something I can do to make these
recognize Windows 7 on my PC? Or is the problem with the installer files?

--
David E. Ross
http://www.rossde.com

Too often, Twitter is a source of verbal vomit. Examples include Donald
Trump and Roseanne Barr.
Ads
  #2  
Old August 11th 18, 12:58 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,505
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

David E. Ross wrote:

I have Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64.
However, I cannot install updates to two applications ...
Both throw up error popups claiming my Windows version is not compatible.
These a
* Thunderbird 60.0 (update from 52.9.1)
* Skype 8.27.0.85 (update from 7.36.0.150)


I've used Thunderbird on Windows 7 Home x64 (but went back to MS
Outlook). I've never bothered to install Skype and even reject (hide)
the Windows Updates for Skype (I don't need updates for a product that
is not installed). I'll only address the Thunderbird update issue.

Thunderbird automatically checks for updates every day. If you disable
auto-updating and prefer manual updating, use the menu - Help - About
Thunderbird. Mozilla has never understand the difference between
checking for updates and applying updates. To Mozilla, checking for an
update means also downloading a new one, if available, and immediately
applying it. Very rude. That has Thunderbird go to Mozilla's file
server to get the correct file to download (and run).

Are you using Thunderbird to check for a new update (and then apply it)?
Are you using a web browser to go to the Thunderbird download page
(https://www.thunderbird.net/en-US/thunderbird/all/), picking a file for
the full installer, downloading it, and running it yourself? If the
latter, are you sure you are picking the Windows download and not one
for some other OS, like macOS or Linux?

As I recall, you cannot install programs in Windows' safe mode (that use
MSI to install themselves). You could use msconfig.exe to disable most
(but not all) startup programs, reboot into Windows' normal mode (but
without loading all the startup programs), and see if the installer then
works okay. If the installer works under a neutered Windows, something
you load on Windows startup or on login is interferring with the
installers.

Are you running the installer with admin privileges?

Did you disable the Application Experience service (AeLookupSvc) in
Windows that lookups up processes to determine the compatibility mode
under which to run a program?

Before you run the installer, did you check in Task Manager's Processes
tab that there were no instances of thunderbird.exe still loaded?

Mozilla started adding SHA-256 signing certificates to Thunderbird back
around version 38.5.1 during Jan 2016. I believe this was due to new
signing requirements in Windows. Some users encountered invalid certs
and had to revert back to a prior version with a valid cert (and then
use auto-update or update check within Thunderbird).
  #3  
Old August 11th 18, 01:42 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ralph Fox
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 295
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 18:58:50 -0500, VanguardLH wrote:

Mozilla has never understand the difference between
checking for updates and applying updates. To Mozilla, checking for an
update means also downloading a new one, if available, and immediately
applying it.



It is not doing that here. I just get a message that an update is available.
I manually choose to download and install the update.


--
Kind regards
Ralph
  #4  
Old August 11th 18, 01:47 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
David E. Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 960
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On 8/10/2018 4:58 PM, VanguardLH wrote:
David E. Ross wrote:

I have Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64.
However, I cannot install updates to two applications ...
Both throw up error popups claiming my Windows version is not compatible.
These a
* Thunderbird 60.0 (update from 52.9.1)
* Skype 8.27.0.85 (update from 7.36.0.150)


I've used Thunderbird on Windows 7 Home x64 (but went back to MS
Outlook). I've never bothered to install Skype and even reject (hide)
the Windows Updates for Skype (I don't need updates for a product that
is not installed). I'll only address the Thunderbird update issue.

Thunderbird automatically checks for updates every day. If you disable
auto-updating and prefer manual updating, use the menu - Help - About
Thunderbird. Mozilla has never understand the difference between
checking for updates and applying updates. To Mozilla, checking for an
update means also downloading a new one, if available, and immediately
applying it. Very rude. That has Thunderbird go to Mozilla's file
server to get the correct file to download (and run).

Are you using Thunderbird to check for a new update (and then apply it)?
Are you using a web browser to go to the Thunderbird download page
(https://www.thunderbird.net/en-US/thunderbird/all/), picking a file for
the full installer, downloading it, and running it yourself? If the
latter, are you sure you are picking the Windows download and not one
for some other OS, like macOS or Linux?

As I recall, you cannot install programs in Windows' safe mode (that use
MSI to install themselves). You could use msconfig.exe to disable most
(but not all) startup programs, reboot into Windows' normal mode (but
without loading all the startup programs), and see if the installer then
works okay. If the installer works under a neutered Windows, something
you load on Windows startup or on login is interferring with the
installers.

Are you running the installer with admin privileges?

Did you disable the Application Experience service (AeLookupSvc) in
Windows that lookups up processes to determine the compatibility mode
under which to run a program?

Before you run the installer, did you check in Task Manager's Processes
tab that there were no instances of thunderbird.exe still loaded?

Mozilla started adding SHA-256 signing certificates to Thunderbird back
around version 38.5.1 during Jan 2016. I believe this was due to new
signing requirements in Windows. Some users encountered invalid certs
and had to revert back to a prior version with a valid cert (and then
use auto-update or update check within Thunderbird).


I disable all automatic installs, except for updates of virus databases
used by my three anti-virus applications. I noticed in the
mozilla.support.thunderbird newsgroup that a new version of Thunderbird
was available. I used my browser (SeaMonkey) to download it from the
Mozilla download site https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/thunderbird/.

The failure was NOT a case of a Thunderbird process still running. As
my original post in this thread indicated, I got an error popup that
said I needed at least Windows 7 to install the Thunderbird update.
However, I do indeed have Windows 7.

I had also downloaded the file of SHA512 hash codes for Thunderbird 60.0
from the Mozilla site and located the hash code for the 32-bit Windows
US English version. I was able to confirm that the downloaded
Thunderbird installer file conformed to that hash code.

Note that the process I followed in my attempt to install the 60.0
version is the same process I used in the past to install prior
versions, most recently only one month ago to install version 52.9.1.
And the process I followed in my attempt to install the 8.27.0.85
version of Skype was the same process I used in the past to install
prior versions, most recently only three months ago to install the 7.36
version.

--
David E. Ross
http://www.rossde.com

Too often, Twitter is a source of verbal vomit. Examples include Donald
Trump and Roseanne Barr.
  #5  
Old August 11th 18, 02:23 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ralph Fox
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 295
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 14:58:48 -0700, David E. Ross wrote:

I have Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64. I can verify that I at least have
some variety of Windows 7 by various installed applications. These
include:
* Belarc Advisor from http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html.
* ProduKey from http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html
* Windows Update (showing an update that I have not yet installed)
* Computer (both the Properties when I right-click on the icon and the
display when I select [Help About Windows] in the open window)

However, I cannot install updates to two applications whose Web pages
indicate they are compatible with Windows 7. Both throw up error popups
claiming my Windows version is not compatible. These a
* Thunderbird 60.0 (update from 52.9.1)
* Skype 8.27.0.85 (update from 7.36.0.150)
Note: I attempted to install these from complete downloaded installer
files. I disabled my Internet connection and my anti-virus application
AFTER downloading and scanning the files.

What is going on here? Is there something I can do to make these
recognize Windows 7 on my PC? Or is the problem with the installer files?



My guess is that there may be some "compatibility mode" settings in the
registry, which tell Windows to run the installer program in compatibility
mode for an older version of Windows.

"Thunderbird Setup 60.0.exe" is just a 7zip self-extractor. The actual
installation is done by the program "setup.exe" inside the self-extractor.

When you run "Thunderbird Setup 60.0.exe", it is obvious when it is the
self-extractor running and when it is "setup.exe" running. You can see
which one is throwing the error popup. (I can't, because I am not seeing
that error popup.)


--
Kind regards
Ralph
  #6  
Old August 11th 18, 02:52 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Zaidy036[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 379
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On 8/10/2018 5:58 PM, David E. Ross wrote:
I have Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64. I can verify that I at least have
some variety of Windows 7 by various installed applications. These
include:
* Belarc Advisor from http://www.belarc.com/free_download.html.
* ProduKey from http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/product_cd_key_viewer.html
* Windows Update (showing an update that I have not yet installed)
* Computer (both the Properties when I right-click on the icon and the
display when I select [Help About Windows] in the open window)

However, I cannot install updates to two applications whose Web pages
indicate they are compatible with Windows 7. Both throw up error popups
claiming my Windows version is not compatible. These a
* Thunderbird 60.0 (update from 52.9.1)
* Skype 8.27.0.85 (update from 7.36.0.150)
Note: I attempted to install these from complete downloaded installer
files. I disabled my Internet connection and my anti-virus application
AFTER downloading and scanning the files.

What is going on here? Is there something I can do to make these
recognize Windows 7 on my PC? Or is the problem with the installer files?

Thunderbird 52.9.1 (32-bit) not 64 and is current version. Os 60.0 for
64 bit

--
Zaidy036
  #7  
Old August 11th 18, 03:25 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,645
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

"David E. Ross" wrote

| The failure was NOT a case of a Thunderbird process still running. As
| my original post in this thread indicated, I got an error popup that
| said I needed at least Windows 7 to install the Thunderbird update.
| However, I do indeed have Windows 7.

You probably know this, but you might try
running Process Monitor to see what it does before
it quits. That might give you a clue as to where
it's getting its info.


  #8  
Old August 11th 18, 05:21 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,411
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 17:47:48 -0700, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

I disable all automatic installs, except for updates of virus databases
used by my three anti-virus applications.


LOL, "my three anti-virus applications" reminds me of an older lady I
used to know, except in her case the three AV programs were all active
simultaneously.

--

Char Jackson
  #9  
Old August 11th 18, 05:48 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,505
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

Zaidy036 wrote:

Thunderbird 52.9.1 (32-bit) not 64 and is current version. Os 60.0 for
64 bit


The OP reported he is using Windows 7 Enterprise x64. Though not
mentioned if this is a new OS instance, I suspect he has been using for
a long time and has had several Thunderbird updates under that 64-bit
version of Windows.

There are 32- and 64-bit versions of Thunderbird for Linux. For
Windows, there is only the 32-bit version of Thunderbird. Also see:

https://www.thunderbird.net/en-US/th...-requirements/
See the "Please note ..." paragraph.

32-bit programs run on both 32- and 64-bit versions of Windows. It's
the 16-bit programs (whether the program itself or its installer) that
will not run on 64-bit versions of Windows (but will run on the 32-bit
versions of Windows) due to the WOW (Windows On Windows) emulator:
32-bit Windows comes with its 16-bit WOW32 (Windows 16-bit on Windows
32-bit) emulation aka NTVDM layer while 64-bit Windows comes with its
32-bit WOW64 (Windows 32-bit on Windows 64-bit) emulation layer. There
is no WOW32 with 64-bit Windows, just WOW64.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_on_Windows.

32-bit Windows: Runs 16-bit (using WOW32) or native 32-bit programs.
64-bit Windows: Runs 32-bit (using WOW64) or native 64-bit programs but
no 16-bit (WOW32) support.

Since Thunderbird was first released in 2003, I doubt it ever had a
16-bit version for either its installer or the program itself. With
WOW, 32-bit Thunderbird has no problems running under either 32- or
64-bit versions of Windows. I suspect the 32- and 64-bit versions of
Thunderbird for Linux are required because Linux doesn't have the
emulation layer available in Windows. However, that might be the
default distros for Linux as I've read users could install the i386
architecture libraries into Linux. That is, you need to ensure the
32-bit binaries are available in a 64-bit Linux distro. Instead of
making TB users into Linux wizards, they simply provide both 32- and
64-bit versions of TB.

64-bit support adds little support for Thunderbird for Windows. It
already uses SQL-like databases for its local data, and message store.

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Profile_fo...n_the_profile).

Those account-specific subfolders contain the .msf files which hold the
headers and summary info for each message but not the entire e-mail
message. The entire message is store per "folder" (a logical structure
within Thunderbird, not a folder in the OS' file system) in an MBOX file
(named for the "folder" in TB and with no extension on the filename).

Sqlite databases can be up to 140 TB in size (2^47 bytes, or 128
tibibytes) with a theoretical maximum row (record) count of 2^64. The
physical size of the sqlite database file is restricted by the maximum
file size supported by the OS' file system. SQL requests don't need
64-bit to access its records (in this case since we're not talking about
monstrously huge databases accessed by millions of users which SQLite
was not designed to handle). I could not find where the message are at
http://kb.mozillazine.org/Files_and_..._-_Thunderbird
or in the prior article an .sqlite file where messages are stored (the
global one is just for the search index).

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Importing_...ail#Mbox_files

Thunderbird uses both MSF (Mail Summary File - an index) files with
MBOXrd files (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mbox - those are the files
with no extensions) to hold all messages in a TB "folder". There's
MailDir (see https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb...ir-thunderbird
and https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird/Maildir, citing the feature
availability in TB 38) but I doubt it has yet become the the default for
TB's message store. For MBOX files, there are limits; see:

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Limits_-_Thunderbird
Max number of messages: 2^32, or 4 billion.
Max size of each message: 4GB.

If someone is sending you 4GB, or larger, e-mails then they haven't a
clue that e-mail is not a file transfer protocol (has no resume, no CRC
check, no guaranteed delivery, bandwidth for mail servers is throttled
per session so the other users get some decent response from the server)
and should instead be using online file storage and e-mail you a URL to
their uploaded file. In your entire life, have you received over FOUR
BILLION e-mails? If so, you should be organizing your e-mails into
other [sub]folders. Inbox should the temporary for new e-mails. Move
long-term e-mails into an Archive folder and possibly with subfolders
named for how you are grouping the ancient e-mails.

Since Thunderbird is using SQLite for its management and MBOX files with
internal structures for storing messages, it has no need for 64-bit
pointers. The TB client is not designed to be shared by thousands of
employees at the same workplace. Nothing would speed up in Thunderbird
by using 64-bit. A 32-bit OS is not a limitation to how much data TB
can access in its databases or structured file stores; however, the file
system will determine the max partition and max file sizes. A 64-bit OS
lets a program access more memory but then Thunderbird isn't a graphics
game where tons of data, like textures or maps, gets stored in system
memory. After all, you aren't reading every message ever stored in
Thunderbird at the same time. The MSF files are used when searching for
messages, and those have already been built for you, so a larger buffer
for a non-backgrounded search won't speed up the search that's already
been done. YOU are accessing just one message at a time. More bits
means a buffer could be larger but can you read more than 4 billion
bytes at a time? A larger buffer would benefit, say, a video player or
editor but not for something presented to such a very slow input device
(that is, the human).

Since Mozilla is divesting itself of Thunderbird and passing its
development onto the independent Thunderbird Project community, there
will likely never be a 64-bit version of Thunderbird for Windows. It's
already there for Linux because users might have to add 32-bit binaries
into a 64-bit Linux distro which is beyond the expertise of most users
(they're lucky if they can manage the installation).
  #10  
Old August 11th 18, 06:37 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
David E. Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 960
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On 8/10/2018 9:21 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 17:47:48 -0700, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

I disable all automatic installs, except for updates of virus databases
used by my three anti-virus applications.


LOL, "my three anti-virus applications" reminds me of an older lady I
used to know, except in her case the three AV programs were all active
simultaneously.


Oooohh, no. I only have AVG Anti-Virus Free running in the background.
However, I use that plus Malwarebytes and Microsoft Security Essentials
to scan downloaded software updates and also unexpected E-mail
attachments. Each of those three scan for things the others do not.

About 3.5 years ago, I had to have my C and J partions reformatted and
then re-install all my software (including Windows) because of a virus.
Now, I am super cautious.

Malwarebytes and Microsoft Security Essentials do not run on my PC
unless I manually launch them to scan something (only one scan at a
time). Today, I had Malwarebytes scan all my drives, during which I
disabled both my Internet connection and AVG Anti-Virus. Tomorrow, I
will be away from my PC for a few hours; at that time, I will use
Microsoft Security Essentials to scan all my drives, again with my
Internet connection and AVG Anti-Virus disabled.

--
David E. Ross
http://www.rossde.com

Too often, Twitter is a source of verbal vomit. Examples include Donald
Trump and Roseanne Barr.
  #11  
Old August 11th 18, 03:21 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Zaidy036[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 379
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On 8/11/2018 1:37 AM, David E. Ross wrote:
On 8/10/2018 9:21 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 17:47:48 -0700, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

I disable all automatic installs, except for updates of virus databases
used by my three anti-virus applications.


LOL, "my three anti-virus applications" reminds me of an older lady I
used to know, except in her case the three AV programs were all active
simultaneously.


Oooohh, no. I only have AVG Anti-Virus Free running in the background.
However, I use that plus Malwarebytes and Microsoft Security Essentials
to scan downloaded software updates and also unexpected E-mail
attachments. Each of those three scan for things the others do not.

About 3.5 years ago, I had to have my C and J partions reformatted and
then re-install all my software (including Windows) because of a virus.
Now, I am super cautious.

Malwarebytes and Microsoft Security Essentials do not run on my PC
unless I manually launch them to scan something (only one scan at a
time). Today, I had Malwarebytes scan all my drives, during which I
disabled both my Internet connection and AVG Anti-Virus. Tomorrow, I
will be away from my PC for a few hours; at that time, I will use
Microsoft Security Essentials to scan all my drives, again with my
Internet connection and AVG Anti-Virus disabled.


I hope each AV program is set to exclude the locations of ALL other
quarantines.


--
Zaidy036
  #12  
Old August 11th 18, 03:35 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Zaidy036[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 379
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On 8/11/2018 12:48 AM, VanguardLH wrote:
Zaidy036 wrote:

Thunderbird 52.9.1 (32-bit) not 64 and is current version. Os 60.0 for
64 bit


The OP reported he is using Windows 7 Enterprise x64. Though not
mentioned if this is a new OS instance, I suspect he has been using for
a long time and has had several Thunderbird updates under that 64-bit
version of Windows.

There are 32- and 64-bit versions of Thunderbird for Linux. For
Windows, there is only the 32-bit version of Thunderbird. Also see:

https://www.thunderbird.net/en-US/th...-requirements/
See the "Please note ..." paragraph.

32-bit programs run on both 32- and 64-bit versions of Windows. It's
the 16-bit programs (whether the program itself or its installer) that
will not run on 64-bit versions of Windows (but will run on the 32-bit
versions of Windows) due to the WOW (Windows On Windows) emulator:
32-bit Windows comes with its 16-bit WOW32 (Windows 16-bit on Windows
32-bit) emulation aka NTVDM layer while 64-bit Windows comes with its
32-bit WOW64 (Windows 32-bit on Windows 64-bit) emulation layer. There
is no WOW32 with 64-bit Windows, just WOW64.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_on_Windows.

32-bit Windows: Runs 16-bit (using WOW32) or native 32-bit programs.
64-bit Windows: Runs 32-bit (using WOW64) or native 64-bit programs but
no 16-bit (WOW32) support.

Since Thunderbird was first released in 2003, I doubt it ever had a
16-bit version for either its installer or the program itself. With
WOW, 32-bit Thunderbird has no problems running under either 32- or
64-bit versions of Windows. I suspect the 32- and 64-bit versions of
Thunderbird for Linux are required because Linux doesn't have the
emulation layer available in Windows. However, that might be the
default distros for Linux as I've read users could install the i386
architecture libraries into Linux. That is, you need to ensure the
32-bit binaries are available in a 64-bit Linux distro. Instead of
making TB users into Linux wizards, they simply provide both 32- and
64-bit versions of TB.

64-bit support adds little support for Thunderbird for Windows. It
already uses SQL-like databases for its local data, and message store.

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Profile_fo...n_the_profile).

Those account-specific subfolders contain the .msf files which hold the
headers and summary info for each message but not the entire e-mail
message. The entire message is store per "folder" (a logical structure
within Thunderbird, not a folder in the OS' file system) in an MBOX file
(named for the "folder" in TB and with no extension on the filename).

Sqlite databases can be up to 140 TB in size (2^47 bytes, or 128
tibibytes) with a theoretical maximum row (record) count of 2^64. The
physical size of the sqlite database file is restricted by the maximum
file size supported by the OS' file system. SQL requests don't need
64-bit to access its records (in this case since we're not talking about
monstrously huge databases accessed by millions of users which SQLite
was not designed to handle). I could not find where the message are at
http://kb.mozillazine.org/Files_and_..._-_Thunderbird
or in the prior article an .sqlite file where messages are stored (the
global one is just for the search index).

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Importing_...ail#Mbox_files

Thunderbird uses both MSF (Mail Summary File - an index) files with
MBOXrd files (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mbox - those are the files
with no extensions) to hold all messages in a TB "folder". There's
MailDir (see https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb...ir-thunderbird
and https://wiki.mozilla.org/Thunderbird/Maildir, citing the feature
availability in TB 38) but I doubt it has yet become the the default for
TB's message store. For MBOX files, there are limits; see:

http://kb.mozillazine.org/Limits_-_Thunderbird
Max number of messages: 2^32, or 4 billion.
Max size of each message: 4GB.

If someone is sending you 4GB, or larger, e-mails then they haven't a
clue that e-mail is not a file transfer protocol (has no resume, no CRC
check, no guaranteed delivery, bandwidth for mail servers is throttled
per session so the other users get some decent response from the server)
and should instead be using online file storage and e-mail you a URL to
their uploaded file. In your entire life, have you received over FOUR
BILLION e-mails? If so, you should be organizing your e-mails into
other [sub]folders. Inbox should the temporary for new e-mails. Move
long-term e-mails into an Archive folder and possibly with subfolders
named for how you are grouping the ancient e-mails.

Since Thunderbird is using SQLite for its management and MBOX files with
internal structures for storing messages, it has no need for 64-bit
pointers. The TB client is not designed to be shared by thousands of
employees at the same workplace. Nothing would speed up in Thunderbird
by using 64-bit. A 32-bit OS is not a limitation to how much data TB
can access in its databases or structured file stores; however, the file
system will determine the max partition and max file sizes. A 64-bit OS
lets a program access more memory but then Thunderbird isn't a graphics
game where tons of data, like textures or maps, gets stored in system
memory. After all, you aren't reading every message ever stored in
Thunderbird at the same time. The MSF files are used when searching for
messages, and those have already been built for you, so a larger buffer
for a non-backgrounded search won't speed up the search that's already
been done. YOU are accessing just one message at a time. More bits
means a buffer could be larger but can you read more than 4 billion
bytes at a time? A larger buffer would benefit, say, a video player or
editor but not for something presented to such a very slow input device
(that is, the human).

Since Mozilla is divesting itself of Thunderbird and passing its
development onto the independent Thunderbird Project community, there
will likely never be a 64-bit version of Thunderbird for Windows. It's
already there for Linux because users might have to add 32-bit binaries
into a 64-bit Linux distro which is beyond the expertise of most users
(they're lucky if they can manage the installation).

https://www.thunderbird.net/en-US/thunderbird/60.0/releasenotes/

Says must wait for 60.1 to upgrade and that is why 52.9.1 reports it is
up to date.
--
Zaidy036
  #13  
Old August 11th 18, 04:23 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
David E. Ross[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 960
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On 8/11/2018 7:21 AM, Zaidy036 wrote:
On 8/11/2018 1:37 AM, David E. Ross wrote:
On 8/10/2018 9:21 PM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Fri, 10 Aug 2018 17:47:48 -0700, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

I disable all automatic installs, except for updates of virus databases
used by my three anti-virus applications.

LOL, "my three anti-virus applications" reminds me of an older lady I
used to know, except in her case the three AV programs were all active
simultaneously.


Oooohh, no. I only have AVG Anti-Virus Free running in the background.
However, I use that plus Malwarebytes and Microsoft Security Essentials
to scan downloaded software updates and also unexpected E-mail
attachments. Each of those three scan for things the others do not.

About 3.5 years ago, I had to have my C and J partions reformatted and
then re-install all my software (including Windows) because of a virus.
Now, I am super cautious.

Malwarebytes and Microsoft Security Essentials do not run on my PC
unless I manually launch them to scan something (only one scan at a
time). Today, I had Malwarebytes scan all my drives, during which I
disabled both my Internet connection and AVG Anti-Virus. Tomorrow, I
will be away from my PC for a few hours; at that time, I will use
Microsoft Security Essentials to scan all my drives, again with my
Internet connection and AVG Anti-Virus disabled.


I hope each AV program is set to exclude the locations of ALL other
quarantines.



That is not necessary since I deal with each quarantine when it happens.

--
David E. Ross
http://www.rossde.com

Too often, Twitter is a source of verbal vomit. Examples include Donald
Trump and Roseanne Barr.
  #14  
Old August 11th 18, 10:59 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ralph Fox
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 295
Default Some Application Updates Fail to Recognize Windows 7

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018 10:21:28 -0400, Zaidy036 wrote:

I hope each AV program is set to exclude the locations of ALL other
quarantines.



IME quarantined files are (intentionally) encrypted by the AV which
quarantined them. This prevents the files from being used to infect
the system.

Without that AV's encryption key, each other AV will not find a virus
in the quarantined & encrypted file.


--
Kind regards
Ralph
 




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