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WiFi Router Recommendation - Dual band power and fast needed



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 6th 19, 09:34 PM posted to alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Speeder
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Default WiFi Router Recommendation - Dual band power and fast needed


I cannot find reviews for WiFi routers that tell me what I need to know.

Power output in mwatts for 2.4 and 5.0GHz bands.

Speed of transactions withing the WiFi router is paramount.

I have a lot of wifi devices and the need for speed is great.

Suggestions or reviews that compare these features please.

Thanks.
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  #2  
Old May 7th 19, 01:22 AM posted to alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul in Houston TX[_2_]
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Posts: 906
Default WiFi Router Recommendation - Dual band power and fast needed

Speeder wrote:

I cannot find reviews for WiFi routers that tell me what I need to know.

Power output in mwatts for 2.4 and 5.0GHz bands.

Speed of transactions withing the WiFi router is paramount.

I have a lot of wifi devices and the need for speed is great.

Suggestions or reviews that compare these features please.

Thanks.


You probably won't find much info on cheap home wifi.
Move up to a real wifi:
Cisco RV340W
https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/produc...78-739257.html
Use a dBm table to convert to watts:
https://www.data-alliance.net/blog/d...version-table/

  #3  
Old May 7th 19, 02:29 AM posted to alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 2,589
Default WiFi Router Recommendation - Dual band power and fast needed

In message , Speeder
writes:

I cannot find reviews for WiFi routers that tell me what I need to know.

Power output in mwatts for 2.4 and 5.0GHz bands.


Why do you need to know that? (AFAIK, the standard specifies the
maximum, and most routers use it - so it's antenna _gain_ that
differentiates it.
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

live your dash. ... On your tombstone, there's the date you're born and the
date you die - and in between there's a dash. - a friend quoted by Dustin
Hoffman in Radio Times, 5-11 January 2013
  #4  
Old May 7th 19, 09:22 AM posted to alt.windows7.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 8,780
Default WiFi Router Recommendation - Dual band power and fast needed

Speeder wrote:

I cannot find reviews for WiFi routers that tell me what I need to know.

Power output in mwatts for 2.4 and 5.0GHz bands.

Speed of transactions withing the WiFi router is paramount.

I have a lot of wifi devices and the need for speed is great.

Suggestions or reviews that compare these features please.

Thanks.


This site has plenty of information.

https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wire...system-roundup

The power level per antenna, is limited by the FCC unlicensed
operation in the 2.4 and 5GHz bands. It's possible to apply
for a license, to run at higher power. Some commercial installations
(like at your local mall), may run at higher power than retail
equipment.

The FCC spec is written in terms of EIRP. The RF amp has
a certain output, and the "gain" of the antenna sets
the EIRP. A typical retail router, has a low gain antenna,
which means the RF amp is already running pretty close
to the limit. The power level is likely adaptive, and
so the router may turn down the power, as long as a
number of client devices are reporting in OK.

When you get a modern device, you're getting "extra" power
because of the multitude of antennas. This is a higher
level of "equivalent" power, in the sense that the
signal is easier to receive because of MIMO.

What's important, is to read the articles and see how
the latest (expensive) equipment proposes to make
things go faster, or how the schemes intend to cover
a larger household.

Your experience cannot go faster than the Wifi devices
on each client device. If your laptop has 802.11g,
then it doesn't matter what flame-thrower router
you use, the laptop end will be the limiting factor.

Take my laptop as an example. I could probably replace
the module inside the laptop, with something nicer,
except routing antenna wires in the laptop is going
to be a problem. The antennas on my laptop aren't
going to be dual band, there aren't enough antennas,
for a whizzy new plugin internal module.

If I put Wifi in a USB connector, my laptop only has
USB2, so it can't go faster than around 30MB/sec
(240Mbit/sec). If I was getting a GbE (Google Fiber),
then the USB2 connector would not be good enough
for full rate. My laptop is never going to have
USB3, because it doesn't have any ExpressCard slots
for add-on devices.

So while it's fun to dream about expensive routers
as the "fix", don't forget that your older
computing devices simply aren't good candidates
for full-rate usage. Maybe only your newest computer
is "good enough" for the job.

*******

The FCC should have info on products approved for the USA.
For example, the product in the smallnetbuilder review,
might be this one.

https://fccid.io/PY317400404/Test-Re...Report-3788911

(As a PDF).

https://fccid.io/PY317400404/Test-Re...rt-3788911.pdf

Output Power
CDD Mode:
2412 ~ 2462MHz: 967.282mW
5180 ~ 5240MHz: 873.145mW
5260 ~ 5320MHz: 233.401mW
5500 ~ 5700MHz: 232.855mW
5745 ~ 5825MHz: 881.224mW
Beamforming Mode:
2412 ~ 2462MHz: 920.601mW
5180 ~ 5240MHz: 855.208mW
5260 ~ 5320MHz: 229.422mW
5500 ~ 5700MHz: 232.855mW
5745 ~ 5825MHz: 841.395mW

Antenna Gain (dBi)
2.4GHz Band 5GHz U-NII-1 5GHz U-NII-2A 5GHz U-NII-2C 5GHz U-NII-3
Ant. 1 - - - 3.49 3.80
Ant. 2 - - - 3.51 3.57
Ant. 3 2.58 3.72 3.56 - -
Ant. 4 2.89 3.49 3.53 -

The combination of 1000mW of output power, times antenna
gain of roughly 3dB, brings the unit up to the 2W license limit.
Just a guess.

If you replace each antenna with a parabolic dish, the
gain is 30dBi instead of 3dBi, and then the "beam" shooting
out of the dish is non-compliant with FCC unlicensed operation
(that's because the license limit is on EIRP, not RF amp power).
The fact it's a beam, means the antenna only has a tiny field
of view, suitable for making Wifi work in your barn, while
the router is in the farmhouse.

The antennas in the review product are also dual-band in this case,
so any replacement items would also need to be suited to both bands
at once.

While I'm sure there are underpowered client-end Wifi devices
(limited by CMOS radios), a box you buy for $200 that draws
12V @ 2.5A, is likely to be running "max power". It's
the combination of RF amp power output, and the antenna
gain, that brings the unit up to the FCC unlicensed max.
Any more power than that, you can apply for a license.
That makes you a "radio operator" of sorts.

Paul
 




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