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Connecting DSL to Win 10



 
 
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  #16  
Old December 6th 18, 04:46 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
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Posts: 2,329
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

In article , Ken Blake
wrote:


On Wed, 05 Dec 2018 12:04:48 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:
And forgive me for being overly technical, but it's really a
combination router/gateway, not a router/modem. The term "modem" is
short for "MOdulator-DEModulator." Technically, it's a device that
converts the analog signal on the telephone line to the digital signal
needed by a computer, and vice-versa. Technically, any device that
doesn't do that analog to digital conversion is not a modem (Here's my
standard post on modems:


Are you telling me that a DSL 'device' doesn't modulate the digital
signal over an analogue line into several different frequency bins and
demodulate what it receives back into digital? If you are saying that
then just how does it work?


What I wrote is my understanding of how it works. If you want more
details, sorry, I'm the wrong person to ask and I can't provide them.


your understanding is wrong.
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  #17  
Old December 6th 18, 05:15 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 7,915
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

Keith Nuttle wrote:

I don't know if I am right but I always suspect that when the telephone
went digital in the 1980's, the differnce in the transmission of the
digital conversation and data converged into the same basic system.

I assumed this because of the a telephone number is the same number of
digits as a URL

192.168.01.01
919-333-3636

Is this assumption correct?


wha ???

Aktually, cause they're one digit different,
they couldn't converge them.

Now we have to start over again.

That's why we have IPV6 today, the "telephone mistake".
And because of one stinkin digit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6_address

"An example of an IPv6 address is:

2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334
"

See how easy to remember that is ? I found that
number on a bathroom wall once. "For a good
time, dial... 2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334".

OK, now run your telephone theory past me one more time.

2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334
919-333-3636-919-333-3636-919-333-3636

Damn! They're still off by one digit. What the...

This is never going to work!

*******

Do you realize how long it would take to explain this ?

In the beginning, it started with two tomato tins and
a piece of string. One tomato tin was "0", the
other tomato tin was "1". And that's where
"numbering plans" came from. "Can I talk to '1' please?"
"Speaking". When they made the string longer, you
had to put a 1- in front (long distance).

Paul
  #18  
Old December 6th 18, 05:19 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
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Posts: 2,329
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

In article , Paul
wrote:

"An example of an IPv6 address is:

2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334
"

See how easy to remember that is ? I found that
number on a bathroom wall once. "For a good
time, dial... 2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334".


was it?
  #19  
Old December 6th 18, 05:33 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Andy Burns[_6_]
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Posts: 776
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

Paul wrote:

Keith Nuttle wrote:

I assumed this because of the a telephone number is the same number of
digits as a URL
Is this assumption correct?


wha ???


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Not_even_wrong
  #20  
Old December 6th 18, 05:35 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
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Posts: 9,617
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 18:51:17 +0000, Andy Burns
wrote:

KenK wrote:

Zyxel model number C1100Z


So you'll need to add a new PPoE "dialler" in control panel, network and
sharing


The PPPoE config should already be in the modem/router device, so by the
time the PC sees anything, it's plain old Ethernet. No need for PPPoE on
the PC.

  #21  
Old December 6th 18, 05:35 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
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Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 19:27:19 +0000, Andy Burns
wrote:

Paul wrote:

Andy Burns wrote:

KenK wrote:

Zyxel model number C1100Z

So you'll need to add a new PPoE "dialler" in control panel, network
and sharing


VDSL2 Modem/router/icecube_maker.


Odd that century link just describe it as "a modem", when taking an
actual look, it is a combined modem/router/access point like everyone
else calls "a router"

ignore the PPPoE suggestion.


Oops, ignore my previous post. You're spot on.

  #22  
Old December 6th 18, 05:37 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Andy Burns[_6_]
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Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

Char Jackson wrote:

Andy Burns wrote:

you'll need to add a new PPoE "dialler"


The PPPoE config should already be in the modem/router device, so by the
time the PC sees anything, it's plain old Ethernet. No need for PPPoE on
the PC.


Yeah, using a xDSL device as a modem or bridge device was/is pretty
rare, I shouldn't have believed the supplier's one-liner description.
  #23  
Old December 6th 18, 05:48 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
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Posts: 9,617
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 20:42:17 -0500, Keith Nuttle
wrote:

On 12/5/2018 5:04 PM, rp wrote:
On Wed, 05 Dec 2018 12:04:48 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

And forgive me for being overly technical, but it's really a
combination router/gateway, not a router/modem. The term "modem" is
short for "MOdulator-DEModulator." Technically, it's a device that
converts the analog signal on the telephone line to the digital signal
needed by a computer, and vice-versa. Technically, any device that
doesn't do that analog to digital conversion is not a modem (Here's my
standard post on modems:


Are you telling me that a DSL 'device' doesn't modulate the digital
signal over an analogue line into several different frequency bins and
demodulate what it receives back into digital? If you are saying that
then just how does it work?

It's still the sane old analogue telephone line until it gets a
modulator and demodulator at each end to make it a digital subscriber
line.

I don't know if I am right but I always suspect that when the telephone
went digital in the 1980's, the differnce in the transmission of the
digital conversation and data converged into the same basic system.


Went digital? POTS never went digital. Are you thinking of VoIP?

I assumed this because of the a telephone number is the same number of
digits as a URL


Note that what follows is not a URL, but an example of an IPv4 address.

192.168.01.01
919-333-3636

Is this assumption correct?


That's an interesting theory. Alas, it's completely wrong. :-)

  #24  
Old December 6th 18, 05:52 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
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Posts: 2,329
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

In article , Char Jackson
wrote:

I don't know if I am right but I always suspect that when the telephone
went digital in the 1980's, the differnce in the transmission of the
digital conversation and data converged into the same basic system.


Went digital? POTS never went digital. Are you thinking of VoIP?


other than the last mile, it did.
  #25  
Old December 6th 18, 07:42 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
rp[_2_]
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Posts: 23
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

On Wed, 05 Dec 2018 16:31:59 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

Are you telling me that a DSL 'device' doesn't modulate the digital
signal over an analogue line into several different frequency bins and
demodulate what it receives back into digital? If you are saying that
then just how does it work?



What I wrote is my understanding of how it works. If you want more
details, sorry, I'm the wrong person to ask and I can't provide them.


You are the one saying it's not a modem and yet you don't understand
how it works! Paul gives a good description but note that the word
modulation is used.

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


  #26  
Old December 6th 18, 07:51 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
rp[_2_]
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Posts: 23
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 20:42:17 -0500, Keith Nuttle wrote:

I don't know if I am right but I always suspect that when the telephone
went digital in the 1980's, the differnce in the transmission of the
digital conversation and data converged into the same basic system.


Transmission only went digital between exchanges. The line from the
exchange to the phone is still analogue. It's converted to digital in
the exchange, sent to the target exchange and then converted back to
analogue and sent to the other parties phone. Otherwise everyone would
have had to replace their handsets with ones that contain D/A and A/D
converters.

I assumed this because of the a telephone number is the same number of
digits as a URL

192.168.01.01
919-333-3636

Is this assumption correct?


No, that assumption is not correct. What about an IP address of
1.2.3.4, it exists and someone will (most likely) be using it. If you
are adding leading zeroes your example must be 192.168.001.001 since
each value can be from 0 to 255.

The numbers are an IP address, a url is in letters (www.example.com).

--
Regards - Rodney Pont
The from address exists but is mostly dumped,
please send any emails to the address below
e-mail rpont (at) gmail (dot) com


  #27  
Old December 6th 18, 01:42 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
mechanic
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Posts: 909
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

On Wed, 05 Dec 2018 14:40:58 -0500, nospam wrote:

in some cases, a router *does* directly connect to the internet.


In the UK domestic 'routers' connect to a local Digital Subscriber
Line Access Multiplexer (property of OpenReach) that routes your
traffic to somewhere in your ISP's network before it hits the
'Internet'.
  #28  
Old December 6th 18, 02:38 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
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Posts: 2,329
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

In article , mechanic
wrote:


in some cases, a router *does* directly connect to the internet.


In the UK domestic 'routers' connect to a local Digital Subscriber
Line Access Multiplexer (property of OpenReach) that routes your
traffic to somewhere in your ISP's network before it hits the
'Internet'.


that's for dsl. there are other options.
  #29  
Old December 6th 18, 02:59 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
VanguardLH[_2_]
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Posts: 9,858
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

rp wrote:

Ken Blake wrote:

What I wrote is my understanding of how it works. If you want more
details, sorry, I'm the wrong person to ask and I can't provide
them.


You are the one saying it's not a modem and yet you don't understand
how it works! Paul gives a good description but note that the word
modulation is used.


modem = modulation/demodulation
^^^________^^^

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Modulator-Demodulator

Paul mentioned both in his article.
  #30  
Old December 6th 18, 05:26 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Tim[_10_]
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Posts: 205
Default Connecting DSL to Win 10

mechanic wrote in news:e2qt8nor9swp
:

On Wed, 05 Dec 2018 14:40:58 -0500, nospam wrote:

in some cases, a router *does* directly connect to the internet.


By strict definition, a router receives a digital packet from one port, and
uses that packet's destination address info to select which other port to
sent it out of, thus 'routing' it to its destination.


In the UK domestic 'routers' connect to a local Digital Subscriber
Line Access Multiplexer (property of OpenReach) that routes your
traffic to somewhere in your ISP's network before it hits the
'Internet'.


The DSLAM is the equipment that places the DSL data onto the analog
subscriber phone line, and is located somewhere between the phone switch
and the subscriber. These days they are usually co-located on premise with
the telephone switch.

For outgoing data, the DSLAM takes the packet off of the DSL line and
passes it on to the provider's router to send it off to its destination on
the internet.
 




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