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[OT] Malware alert? (was: Simultaneously slide Windows Linux iOS Android files back and forth over USB at 7GB per minute speeds using 100% native devices (no proprietary software needed))



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 14th 18, 04:28 PM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Frank Slootweg
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Posts: 489
Default [OT] Malware alert? (was: Simultaneously slide Windows Linux iOS Android files back and forth over USB at 7GB per minute speeds using 100% native devices (no proprietary software needed))

Arlen Holder wrote:
[...]

http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=8918650usb01.jpg
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=8157466usb02.jpg
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=2107706usb03.jpg


FWIW, when I visited these pages, I got a popup - allegedly from
Windows Defender [1] - claiming that I had some kind of malware and
telling me to call 'Microsoft' at some number. Yeah, RIGHT!

I am not accusing you or this website of anything, but these pages
were the only 'special' ones I had open at the time, the two others were
websites which I use very often.

After the popup, there was an even more 'terryfying' :-) page with
alarming messages in red.

Somehow they managed to demote the browser (IE) to the bottom of the
Task Manager list, so you had to freeze Task Manager in order to do an
'End Task' on IE.

OTOH, may be I was just a target, because I just bad-mouthed Windows
10! :-)

[1] Never mind that I don't run Windows Defender.
Ads
  #2  
Old September 14th 18, 05:30 PM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14 Sep 2018 08:28:52 GMT, Frank Slootweg wrote:

http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=8918650usb01.jpg
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=8157466usb02.jpg
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=2107706usb03.jpg


FWIW, when I visited these pages, I got a popup - allegedly from
Windows Defender [1] - claiming that I had some kind of malware and
telling me to call 'Microsoft' at some number. Yeah, RIGHT!


I've used http://bild.me for a long time where nobody complained.
But since there was a typo in the original files anyway, I modified them
just now, and uploaded them using http://fileconvoy.com

These files will be deleted in 21 days, but they're available now.
http://www.fileconvoy.com/dfl.php?id=gcb6a0b17f6ad694c1000113621fa665a5352f6 f259

If you have a better free no-reg photo upload site, let me know and I'll
use that instead.

Mainly, the screenshots simply prove I did the file transfer between the
mobile device and the Windows system disk, without even Windows being
booted (it needs to NOT be set to hibernate though).

I provide proof with screenshots since there is always a "genius" who
claims to have a "better" method which he can never explain.

I've been on Usenet for decades, where some "genius" always claims to have
a better file transfer method - which never exists when you ask for proof.

This cross platform file transfer method is the *best* I can think of,
since it has zero restrictions, it works on everything, and, it requires no
software other than what comes with a typical system.

I doubt there is a *better* mechanism on this planet - but if you know of a
better mechanism for transferring large files between Windows and Ubuntu
and iOS and Android - please let us all know because this is as good as it
gets as far as I know.
  #3  
Old September 14th 18, 11:47 PM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Carlos E. R.[_2_]
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Posts: 20
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14/09/2018 12.30, Arlen Holder wrote:
On 14 Sep 2018 08:28:52 GMT, Frank Slootweg wrote:

http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=8918650usb01.jpg
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=8157466usb02.jpg
http://www.bild.me/bild.php?file=2107706usb03.jpg



....

Mainly, the screenshots simply prove I did the file transfer between the
mobile device and the Windows system disk, without even Windows being
booted (it needs to NOT be set to hibernate though).


I fail to see what is so fantastic or rare about that.

The Windows system disk is just another disk to Linux, and transferring
files over usb to a tablet is just normal business of the day.

Now, 2 gigabytes per minute means 33 MB/second. As USB-2 can do
440Mbit/S, that is hardly surprising, providing the write speed of the
target device is up to the task. If not, you are measuring the cache speed.

--
Cheers,
Carlos E.R.
  #4  
Old September 15th 18, 01:23 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14 Sep 2018 15:47:36 GMT, Carlos E. R. wrote:

I fail to see what is so fantastic or rare about that.


Hi Carlos,

Thanks for the adult question, where we've spoken a lot in the past so I
know you are generally reasonable. (See the speed question for you at the
end of this post.)

*The biggest deal is that most people don't *know* of this clever method!*

Bearing in mind how *simple* this method is, and how *powerful* it is, the
big deal is simply disseminating the *knowledge* of this clever system.

What's fantastic is the simple *power* & *flexibility* of this USB method.
- Any mobile device (it doesn't matter who owns the device)
- Any file (it doesn't matter what size or file type it is)
- Any number of files (that's why we use the native "file explorer")
- Zero proprietary software (there are no limitations on cross platforms)
- Zero setup (everything mounts automatically)
etc.

Bear in mind there are tens of thousands (likely) of threads on "how to
copy" from either iOS or Android to Windows, right?

If all those people knew of this patently simple method, they wouldn't be
asaking all those question, now would they?

So the "big deal" is the *knowledge* of the simple secrets.
HINT: The secret to copying to *Windows* is to use *Linux!* --- clever!

What else is fantastic is that, while you're very knowledgeable, most
people are not anywhere nearly as knowledgeable as you are, in terms of
networking abilities.

Hence, most people use kludges like the iTunes abomination or HTTP servers
on the mobile devices.

For example, has anyone posited a *better* (e.g., faster?) method yet?
HINT: The answer is that there is likely no better USB method known to man.
If there was, someone would propose it, wouldn't they?

The Windows system disk is just another disk to Linux, and transferring
files over usb to a tablet is just normal business of the day.


Carlos ... we have to be realistic when we speak facts.
You just spoke a patently valid fact. I agree.
Adults easily agree on facts.
Facts are funny that way.

My primary response to you is simply what about the reverse?
Bearing in mind that the movies I was transferring came over on Windows.

I know you know the answer to this next question, but I pose it so that
others can see why *this method* is the *best* known to man.

Here's the reverse question (rhetorical for you, Carlos, but not others):
Q: Is this statement true or false?
"The /Linux/ system disk is just another disk to /Windows/,
and transferring files over usb to a tablet is just normal
business of the day."

The point is that if you approach this same problem set from the Windows
platform (and likely from the Mac, but it's hard to tell given that Apple
Apologists live in a world of imaginary belief systems) - it won't work as
well.

Only if you approach it from the Ubuntu side of the desktop, does this
method work so stupendously astoundingly well.

HINT: There's no need for iTunes or proprietary Apple device drivers with
this method.

Now, 2 gigabytes per minute means 33 MB/second. As USB-2 can do
440Mbit/S, that is hardly surprising, providing the write speed of the
target device is up to the task. If not, you are measuring the cache speed.


Carlos ... let's learn more about speed!

The 2GB/minute were my ad hoc results from this morning's effort.

You're likely using far newer equipment than I am, since all my desktops
are about a decade old - so it would be nice to know what the *fastest
likely speeds are achievable on these two circumstances:

What are reasonably attainable speeds on:
1. USB on a more modern desktop to/from an iOS/Android mobile device.
....versus...
2. FTP/SMB/HTTP on those same (i/o limited?) devices

Note: I'm not sure where the speed limitations lie, so let's assume the
latest operating systems of Ubuntu 18.04, Android 7 or 8, iOS 11 or 12, and
Windows 7 or 10.

  #5  
Old September 15th 18, 02:14 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 15 Sep 2018 00:23:32 GMT, Arlen Holder wrote:

What are reasonably attainable speeds on:
1. USB on a more modern desktop to/from an iOS/Android mobile device.
...versus...
2. FTP/SMB/HTTP on those same (i/o limited?) devices


While the typical speeds to be attained over USB & FTP should be clearly
stated, if we're to be adults about this discussion ... I wish to be clear
that this thread was never intended to be about FTP.

I should be clear that it was nospam who wanted to change the topic from
USB file transfer between mobile devices & Windows via Linux ... to FTP
file transfer between those same file systems ... perhaps because nospam
knows full well how dismal iOS is with USB file transfer to and from native
Windows.

HINT: It can't be done with iOS because iOS is brain dead for USB.
Why doesn't Apple just let you manage your iOS file system natively on Windows?
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/misc.phone.mobile.iphone/WjeGznahZwc%5B101-125%5D

I wish to be clear that it wasn't Carlos or Jason who desperately wants the
subject to NOT be about what iOS clearly can't do, to something that iOS
potentially can do.

But if we switch the topic to FTP, which is the only thing iOS can do with
native Windows, then you have to understand how fundamentally different the
results are from USB when you try to do the same things with iOS on FTP.

*Are you aware of these iOS-based limitations when you speak about FTP?*
  #6  
Old September 15th 18, 02:24 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,991
Default [OT] Malware alert?

In article , Arlen Holder
wrote:


While the typical speeds to be attained over USB & FTP should be clearly
stated,


ftp doesn't have a 'typical speed'. it's whatever the network and
devices support.

if we're to be adults about this discussion ... I wish to be clear
that this thread was never intended to be about FTP.


then why did you mention it?


I should be clear that it was nospam who wanted to change the topic from
USB file transfer between mobile devices & Windows via Linux ... to FTP
file transfer between those same file systems ... perhaps because nospam
knows full well how dismal iOS is with USB file transfer to and from native
Windows.


it should be clear that you're trolling, again.
  #7  
Old September 15th 18, 02:42 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14 Sep 2018 18:24:00 GMT, nospam wrote:

ftp doesn't have a 'typical speed'. it's whatever the network and
devices support.


The cross-platform limiting factor here is always going to be iOS.

Q: What method do you propose for full r/w access to all visible files on
all mobile devices, to and from native Windows, if you don't use this
method?

HINT:
a. iOS is the limiting factor
b. iOS is brain dead on Windows USB
c. iOS is barely functional on FTP (compared to Linux USB)

This thread is about the fastest possible read/write file transfer between
both iOS & Android mobile devices and native Windows, via native Linux.

That mechanism, bar none, gives the best cross platform method that works
read/write on both iOS and Android to and from native Windows, using Linux.

The problem here is that others don't know what I know, where you know full
well that *iOS USB file transfer is brain dead on native Windows*.

So you desperately wish to change the subject to FTP.
Why?

Because iOS isn't as brain dead for FTP as iOS is brain dead for USB.
That's why.

You do this silly trick _all_ the time, nospam.

Since you, nospam, are an expert at playing your silly childish games,
you'll likely be successful at changing the subject from what iOS clearly
can't do - to something that - at least - iOS can partially do.

However, if you wish to make the topic FTP, then you're going to have to
answer adult questions on how FTP on iOS is drastically different in
effective results (due to astoundingly huge Apple-created limitations) than
the results are on Android.

*I ask you nospam, do you really want to make this thread about FTP?*

Because, if you do, the astoundingly huge limitations of iOS as compared to
Android on FTP will need to be explained to the naive on this newsgroup.

HINT: The limitations of iOS with respect to FTP file access, compared to
that of Android, are astoundingly severe.

The point is that the huge cross-platform limitations in picking the *best*
and *fastest* and most *versatile* file-system transfer read/write
mechanism, bar none, between all the mobile devices, is *always* going to
be limited by these two facts:
FACT 1: *iOS is essentially brain dead for native Windows USB

to be iOS on Windows USB, nor is it ever going to be iOS on FTP.

if we're to be adults about this discussion ... I wish to be clear
that this thread was never intended to be about FTP.


then why did you mention it?


You can play your silly childish games nospam, where the adults will have
to ponder these very potent cogent facts:
1. iOS is brain dead when it comes to r/w USB transfers with native Windows
2. iOS is less brain dead - but still brain dead - for FTP file transfers

Most of the Linux people responding (e.g., Carlos & Jason) appear to be
ignorant of this fact - but I know you're well aware of the astoundingly
huge limitations of iOS.

Hence, since iOS is always the limiting factor when designing a
cross-platform read/write file-transfer stystem, the *only* mechanism that
works at all - is the one I propose.

Tell me ... nospam ... how does your vaunted FTP file system work when the
FTP server you're putting on iOS can't even *access* the files that USB can
access?

it should be clear that you're trolling, again.


It should be clear that I'm proposing a workable system, that works as well
for iOS as it does for Android, and which utilizes native Ubuntu simply
because native Windows is not as powerful as is native Ubuntu on accessing
foreign file systems.

Those are facts that *adults* will comprehend.

Hence, it's not at all surprising that you can't comprehend those facts.
*Just because you don't like facts, doesn't make them not facts.*

Back on topic, if *anyone* here knows of a *better* way to access *all* the
visible files on both iOS and Android, any iOS or Android device (not just
ones where you have an Apple ID on them, for example), both read and write,
to all four file systems simultaneously (yes, Windows, Linux, Android, and
iOS), then now is the time to prove you actually comprehend the topic.

In summary:
Q: What method do you propose for full r/w access to all visible files on
all mobile devices, to and from native Windows, if you don't use this
method?

HINT:
a. iOS is the limiting factor
b. iOS is brain dead on Windows USB
c. iOS is barely functional on FTP (compared to Linux USB)
  #8  
Old September 15th 18, 03:07 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,991
Default [OT] Malware alert?

In article , Arlen Holder
wrote:

ftp doesn't have a 'typical speed'. it's whatever the network and
devices support.


The cross-platform limiting factor here is always going to be iOS.


nope. the limiting factor is *you*, especially given your sheer lack of
knowledge about networking.
  #9  
Old September 15th 18, 03:43 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14 Sep 2018 15:47:36 GMT, Carlos E. R. wrote:

I fail to see what is so fantastic or rare about that.


Hi Carlos,
I finally realized why you said that!

At first, I thought you didn't recognize the trick of using Linux.
Linux was used to read/write to the Windows file system.
That's because iOS won't work with Windows - but Linux will.

But then I realized you are probably unaware of other key issues.
You don't appear to understand how limited iOS is, compared to Android.

So the answer to your question is simply the answer to this question:

Q: What free software do you propose we install (particularly on iOS) that
will result in *better* (faster, easier, more powerful, etc.) read/write
file-transfer to/from native Windows to/from any iOS/Android device, than
the USB-to-Windows-via-Linux method I outlined in the original post.

*I would _love_ if someone smarter than I, can answer _that_ question!!!*
  #10  
Old September 15th 18, 04:01 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14 Sep 2018 19:07:40 GMT, nospam wrote:

nope. the limiting factor is *you*, especially given your sheer lack of
knowledge about networking.


Play your silly fifth grade childish games forever, nospam.
You never tire of being purposefully unhelpful in every post.

You appear to deprecate my networking ability, which is fine because this
thread isn't about my networking ability.

This thread is about networking.
*Answer this question ... if you actually have an _adult_ brain!*

Q: What free software do you propose we install (particularly on iOS) that
will result in *better* (faster, easier, more powerful, etc.) read/write
file-transfer to/from native Windows to/from any iOS/Android device, than
the USB-to-Windows-via-Linux method I outlined in the original post.

*I would _love_ if someone smarter than I, can answer _that_ question!!!*
  #11  
Old September 15th 18, 04:55 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,991
Default [OT] Malware alert?

In article , Arlen Holder
wrote:

You appear to deprecate my networking ability, which is fine because this
thread isn't about my networking ability.


actually, it's about your network *inability*.

This thread is about networking.


about which you know very little.
  #12  
Old September 15th 18, 05:31 AM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 14 Sep 2018 20:55:52 GMT, nospam wrote:

actually, it's about your network *inability*.

This thread is about networking.


about which you know very little.


*You love to play your childish fifth-grade games, nospam.*

This thread isn't, and never was about my networking skills.
If someone on this ng is smarter than I am, I welcome a better solution.

Since you're not an adult, you'll never comprehend that sentence.
Still, the *adult* question here, for networking experts, is:

Q: What free software do you propose we install (particularly on iOS) that
will result in *better* (faster, easier, more powerful, etc.) read/write
file-transfer to/from native Windows to/from any iOS/Android device, than
the USB-to-Windows-via-Linux method I outlined in the original post.

*I would _love_ if someone smarter than I, can answer _that_ question!!!*

If nobody comes up with a better answer, then I'm not so dumb after all.


HINT: You, nospam, will _never_ come up with *any* answer. You can't.
  #13  
Old September 15th 18, 01:44 PM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,alt.os.linux,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Dan Purgert
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Posts: 68
Default [OT] Malware alert?

Arlen Holder wrote:
On 14 Sep 2018 15:47:36 GMT, Carlos E. R. wrote:

I fail to see what is so fantastic or rare about that.


Hi Carlos,

Thanks for the adult question, where we've spoken a lot in the past so I
know you are generally reasonable. (See the speed question for you at the
end of this post.)

*The biggest deal is that most people don't *know* of this clever method!*


Having grown up with computers, I'm more surprised that anyone wouldn't
know that thet can transfer between USB devices, especially given their
belonging to the group "users of GNU/linux-based OSes".

Maybe its just that kids are better at seeing obvious things. Like one
time, I remember that someone needed me to print 1 copy of like 50
documents on their slow-for-the-era PC.

- open directory
- CTRL+A
- right click menu - print

(let the printer do its thing)
[...]
For example, has anyone posited a *better* (e.g., faster?) method yet?
HINT: The answer is that there is likely no better USB method known to man.
If there was, someone would propose it, wouldn't they?


Use USB3, and sufficiently fast USB slave devices. Bam, faster
[...]
Here's the reverse question (rhetorical for you, Carlos, but not others):
Q: Is this statement true or false?
"The /Linux/ system disk is just another disk to /Windows/,
and transferring files over usb to a tablet is just normal
business of the day."


Unless defaults have changed with the advent of WSL, false. Windows is
(was) by default incapable of reading most standard filesystems used by
GNU/Linux systems.

Tablets / phones, of course, hide the filesystem behind their USB
controller, and simply present themselves as "USB Mass Storage" or
similar. So they have an extra layer of abstraction, similar to running
samba server on a linux host.
[...]
Now, 2 gigabytes per minute means 33 MB/second. As USB-2 can do
440Mbit/S, that is hardly surprising, providing the write speed of the
target device is up to the task. If not, you are measuring the cache speed.


Carlos ... let's learn more about speed!

The 2GB/minute were my ad hoc results from this morning's effort.

You're likely using far newer equipment than I am, since all my desktops
are about a decade old - so it would be nice to know what the *fastest
likely speeds are achievable on these two circumstances:

What are reasonably attainable speeds on:
1. USB on a more modern desktop to/from an iOS/Android mobile device.


USB didn't work at all. Most likely a faulty cable or port on the
phone. Port on the PC is fine, since USB mass storgge devices are shown
without trouble.

2. FTP/SMB/HTTP on those same (i/o limited?) devices


SFTP to the same machine (phone on wifi, machine 1gbit ethernet), 1400
files (total 8.2GB) took about 2100 seconds (35 minutes), with an
average transfer speed of 3.9 MB / second. Unfortunately, because it
was 1400 * 4 MB files, the transfer started / stopped for every file,
would've gone about half again as fast had it been a single file (see
below).

A 3.2 GB transfer to the phone took about 10 minutes. Ran at 6-6.25
MB/s over 1x1 [5 Ghz / 40MHz channel] 802.11n (48-50 mbit/sec over a
medium that can on paper xfer at approx 150).

Appears the wifi is the culprit here, as both the phone and the PC
should be able to sustain higher xfer rates.

That being said, since the on-hand USB cables don't work, wifi transfer
is faster . Also, the wifi/sftp transfer has the benefits of not
requiring me to go upstairs to the office to plug things in (or, at the
moment, buy a new cable). Also works while I'm out of the house.



--
|_|O|_| Registered Linux user #585947
|_|_|O| Github: https://github.com/dpurgert
|O|O|O| PGP: 05CA 9A50 3F2E 1335 4DC5 4AEE 8E11 DDF3 1279 A281
  #14  
Old September 15th 18, 03:11 PM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 498
Default [OT] Malware alert?

On 15 Sep 2018 06:12:19 GMT, nospam wrote:

yep. wireless is the future.


You say that because you know iOS is brain dead on native Windows USB.

Here's my response to Dan Purgert, who happens to be an adult.
(Hint: Remove iOS newsgroups & the children like nospam diminish greatly.)

THANK YOU for your speed tests! (See bottom of this message!)
(It's nice to deal with adults!)

I think you are astute - but I think you're "too smart" in a way.

By that, I mean you may give people too much credit, since, it's a fact
that the cross-platform stumbling block is iOS, not Android so all the work
is in getting it to work read and write for the entire visible file system.

On Android, that's trivial. It's not trivial on iOS.
Hence the tricks that I spoke about (which nobody yet has improved upon but
I wish they would since I'm not the smartest guy on the planet).

How many people know that iOS is completely brain dead on USB with native
Windows for read and write file transfer (it's impossible, in fact)?

You know that. I know that. But a lot of people don't know that.

So, how many people *know* that they can surmount this brain dead situation
simply by booting to Linux instead of to Windows?

You know that. I know that. But a lot of people don't know that.

Then, in addition, how many people know that Linux reads Windows file
systems just fine (for the most part) while Windows does NOT read Linux
file systems at all (for the most part).

You know that. I know that. But a lot of people don't know that.

Hence, the "trick" is knowing two very important facts:
1. Linux can read Windows' disks, and,
2. iOS is completely brain dead on native Windows but not Linux

If people know of a better trick to get read and write access to the entire
visible file system of iOS, then I'm all ears (but it's not gonna be FTP
and anyone who says that it is FTP hasn't actually done it, IMHO).

Maybe its just that kids are better at seeing obvious things. Like one
time, I remember that someone needed me to print 1 copy of like 50
documents on their slow-for-the-era PC.


As I said, it's not obvious to everyone that the trick to obtain full read
and write access to iOS onto native Windows is through Linux.

While that trick is intuitive to you ...

That trick is not intuitive to everyone ... is it?

Use USB3, and sufficiently fast USB slave devices. Bam, faster


While I appreciate the suggestion, what I love are real facts.
I've asked twice already (of Carlos, and of Jason).

Nobody has answered yet the critical question of how fast can we
realistically expect a mobile device USB transfer to be?

Which device or protocol is the limiting factor when we're talking iOS and
Android devices which aren't likely optimized for USB speeds, are they?

Does anyone have actual facts on actual speeds?
(I don't ... so that's why I ask.)

Unless defaults have changed with the advent of WSL, false. Windows is
(was) by default incapable of reading most standard filesystems used by
GNU/Linux systems.


Exactly.
You know the critical stumbling block is that native Windows can not write
or even read the full visible file system of iOS ... so you know the trick
that Linux can read a Windows system disk - but Windows can't read a Linux
system disk.

That's exactly why the method I proposed (which came from a.o.l in the
first place) is so deviously clever!

It's too simple!
Yet, few people *know* about it.

Hence my FYI.
Still, it would be _great_ if a.o.l people could *improve* on the process
where it's frustating to have to deal with morons like nospam who make all
sorts of bogus claims about how bad the solution is - while never once
coming up with any workable solution on their own.

Even Jason and Carlos don't seem to understand, I think, why FTP is a joke.
(Maybe the do understand why, but they haven't said that they do.)

Tablets / phones, of course, hide the filesystem behind their USB
controller, and simply present themselves as "USB Mass Storage" or
similar. So they have an extra layer of abstraction, similar to running
samba server on a linux host.


That "extra layer of abstraction" is no problem on Android, but on iOS,
it's deadly.

In fact, without Linux, I don't know of a single way (other than
jailbreaking) to read/write access the entire visible file system on a
desktop of iOS.

I tried SMB, by the say (aka smbclient/samba), but it turns out that if you
don't root Android, SMB is basically brain dead on Android too.

So what I tried was:
- FTP (it doesn't work on iOS)
- SMB (it doesn't work on iOS nor Android)
- HTTP (it doesn't work on iOS)
- USB (it doesn't work on iOS)
- Linux USB (it works on both iOS and Android)

It took *years* to come up to this solution, so when people say it's
"obvious", I have to take exception to that.

Maybe I'm wrong, but is it really *obvious* to all of you that the *only*
way on earth known to man to get full read/write access to the entire
visible iOS filesystem to native Windows - is through Linux?

USB didn't work at all. Most likely a faulty cable or port on the
phone. Port on the PC is fine, since USB mass storgge devices are shown
without trouble.


*THANK YOU* for trying that speed test!

The speed is everything!
So it's great that you at least tried!

THANK YOU!

I'm not sure what you know, but I will repeat the sad fact that USB on iOS
is basically a non starter for read and write access on native Windows for
the entire iOS visible file system.

It works fine on native Ubuntu 18.04 - but not on native Windows 10.

The best speeds I can attain, admittedly on an old desktop, are 2GB per
minute where the limiting fact could very well be the iOS or Android
device.

SFTP to the same machine (phone on wifi, machine 1gbit ethernet), 1400
files (total 8.2GB) took about 2100 seconds (35 minutes), with an
average transfer speed of 3.9 MB / second. Unfortunately, because it
was 1400 * 4 MB files, the transfer started / stopped for every file,
would've gone about half again as fast had it been a single file (see
below).


Megabyte math is always tricky but that seems to add up to about 234
megabytes per minute, which is a good number to use if that's what it comes
down to.

If we stick with gigabytes per minute as the standard test size (although I
realize size and number of files matters greatly), that's about this:
- My test of USB = 2GB/minute
- Your test of FTP = 0.2GB/minute

So that one comparison, admittedly by two people on different data and
equipment, shows FTP to be about ten times slower than USB.

Does that sound about right?

A 3.2 GB transfer to the phone took about 10 minutes. Ran at 6-6.25
MB/s over 1x1 [5 Ghz / 40MHz channel] 802.11n (48-50 mbit/sec over a
medium that can on paper xfer at approx 150).


Thanks for that second test, which, if my 2GB/minute for USB is
trustworthy, that makes the WiFi transfer only 5 times slower than USB (and
not ten times slower).

Appears the wifi is the culprit here, as both the phone and the PC
should be able to sustain higher xfer rates.


THIS IS A KEY POINT.
In the real world, we never get the advertised transfer rates (IMHO).

That's why I'm asking for real-world data.

Do you think the limiting factor is the WiFI or the phone itself?

That being said, since the on-hand USB cables don't work, wifi transfer
is faster .


Your humor is good.

I agree with that concept that the best method is the one that works.

Also, the wifi/sftp transfer has the benefits of not
requiring me to go upstairs to the office to plug things in (or, at the
moment, buy a new cable). Also works while I'm out of the house.


I do both WiFi transfer and USB transfer, where I find the WiFi transfer
orders of magnitude *slower* than the USB transfer.

They *both* have their place:
- USB = Fast, simple, virtually unlimited for both iOS and Android
- FTP = Slower, extremely limited for iOS

But remember, USB to/from native Windows has to be done from Linux!
(That's the trick.)
  #15  
Old September 15th 18, 03:24 PM posted to comp.mobile.ipad,comp.mobile.android,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,991
Default [OT] Malware alert?

In article , Arlen Holder
wrote:

I do both WiFi transfer and USB transfer, where I find the WiFi transfer
orders of magnitude *slower* than the USB transfer.


yet another thing you're doing wrong.
 




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