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Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXP Pro



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 16th 17, 01:47 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richard Owlett[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXP Pro

I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA
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  #2  
Old January 16th 17, 02:09 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 345
Default Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXP Pro

Richard,

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.


Pick one and follow it. It will most likely work.

*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both
machines.


No such connectivity is needed. But to be able to connect/test you need to
be able to connect to *something*. And connecting to another device that
you're also setting up doubles (at least!) the chance of not getting
anything working.

My suggestion? Take a(n old) modem or smart switch (not connected to the
interwebz) which you know the IP of, and plug your 'puter into that. Now
when you gif your 'puter as static IP in the same range (and with the same
netmask!) you should be able to access that modems/switches setup page with
your browser.

Also be aware of a problem that might exists if you just plug a cable from
one 'puter to the other: the connection might not work (you would need to
use a special "cross-over" cable). The simpelest solution is to just take
a hub/switch/something-like-it and plug both computers cables into it.

Actually, if you would take an old modem you would not even need to go thru
the effort of setting up a static IP, as the DHCP server in that modem will
most likely still work, even when its not connected to the interwebz. :-)

Hope that helps.

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


-- Origional message:
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA



  #3  
Old January 16th 17, 02:10 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Ron Hardin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 200
Default Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXP Pro

Incidental remark: try Cygwin under XP, which puts
a unix-like environment there while leaving
everything else working, at least if all you want
is compilers and shells.

Its /dev/clipboard is enormously useful.

Other machines have files under
//machinename/sharepath for files you share under
windows, so networks are trivial.

--


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #4  
Old January 17th 17, 11:59 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richard Owlett[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXP Pro

On 1/16/2017 8:10 AM, Ron Hardin wrote:
Incidental remark: try Cygwin under XP, which puts
a unix-like environment there while leaving
everything else working, at least if all you want
is compilers and shells.

Its /dev/clipboard is enormously useful.

Other machines have files under
//machinename/sharepath for files you share under
windows, so networks are trivial.


For reasons not relevant here I wish to avoid adding any software
to that machine.

*HOWEVER* saying that Cygwin would provide a unix-like
environment rattled my cage in a productive direction.

For another project I had done a minimal Linux install to a flash
drive.
This time I'll do a much more complete install, specifically
maximizing networking capabilities. I'll not have "linux-like".
I'll have *LINUX*!

Sometimes seeing the obvious takes a while ;/
Thanks all.


  #5  
Old January 17th 17, 09:14 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Ron Hardin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 200
Default Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXP Pro

Richard Owlett wrote:

On 1/16/2017 8:10 AM, Ron Hardin wrote:
Incidental remark: try Cygwin under XP, which puts
a unix-like environment there while leaving
everything else working, at least if all you want
is compilers and shells.

Its /dev/clipboard is enormously useful.

Other machines have files under
//machinename/sharepath for files you share under
windows, so networks are trivial.


For reasons not relevant here I wish to avoid adding any software
to that machine.

*HOWEVER* saying that Cygwin would provide a unix-like
environment rattled my cage in a productive direction.

For another project I had done a minimal Linux install to a flash
drive.
This time I'll do a much more complete install, specifically
maximizing networking capabilities. I'll not have "linux-like".
I'll have *LINUX*!

Sometimes seeing the obvious takes a while ;/
Thanks all.


I started with linux on a laptop and found there weren't drivers
for all the devices; using the original XP solved that, and then
adding Cygwin gave me back the linux capabilities.

In fact I don't know how anybody does anything with a bare XP
system.
--


On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
  #6  
Old January 18th 17, 02:53 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richard Owlett[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Alternative solution - was [ Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXPPro]

On 1/16/2017 7:47 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA


The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as I *HAD
THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".
A USB implementation is available -
http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/163/DS_USBNMC-5030.pdf .
I'll check local suppliers.
Will also continue pursuing the LAN solution for its educational
value.
  #7  
Old January 18th 17, 03:23 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 345
Default Alternative solution - was [ Manually setting a STATIC IP in WinXPPro]

Richard,

The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as
I *HAD THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".


Thats the "cross over" cable I mentioned* :-)

*although a null-modem cable normally includes cross-over, it does need to.

But its still a good idea to first connect to a known-to-be-good device (the
modem or smart switch (or anything else with a web-accessible setup) I
mentioned) so that you can see your fixed IP actually works (on both
'puters), _before_ you try that cross-over cable (I'm not sure you realize,
but now you've introduced a _third_ location that could give you troubles
with setting up such a 'puter-to-'puter connection).

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


-- Origional question.
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
On 1/16/2017 7:47 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA


The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as I *HAD
THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".
A USB implementation is available -
http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/163/DS_USBNMC-5030.pdf .
I'll check local suppliers.
Will also continue pursuing the LAN solution for its educational
value.




  #8  
Old January 18th 17, 04:56 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Richard Owlett[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Alternative solution - was [ Manually setting a STATIC IP inWinXPPro]

On 1/18/2017 9:23 AM, R.Wieser wrote:
Richard,

The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as
I *HAD THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".


Thats the "cross over" cable I mentioned* :-)

*although a null-modem cable normally includes cross-over, it does need to.


*NO*
A "cross over" cable connects two Ethernet ports.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium...ace#Auto_MDI-X

A "null-modem" connects two DTE or two DCE together.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_c...ting_equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_terminal_equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_modem

IOW connect COM ports of two computers to each other.

P.S. I've been using null modems for 50 years ;}
Ethernet is only ~30 years old.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet




But its still a good idea to first connect to a known-to-be-good device (the
modem or smart switch (or anything else with a web-accessible setup) I
mentioned) so that you can see your fixed IP actually works (on both
'puters), _before_ you try that cross-over cable (I'm not sure you realize,
but now you've introduced a _third_ location that could give you troubles
with setting up such a 'puter-to-'puter connection).

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


-- Origional question.
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
On 1/16/2017 7:47 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA


The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as I *HAD
THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".
A USB implementation is available -
http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/163/DS_USBNMC-5030.pdf .
I'll check local suppliers.
Will also continue pursuing the LAN solution for its educational
value.




  #9  
Old January 18th 17, 07:09 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 345
Default Alternative solution - was [ Manually setting a STATIC IP inWinXPPro]

Richard,

*NO*

....
A "null-modem" connects two DTE or two DCE together.


As you feel that strong about it I googled to have some backup for what I
assumed to be true, and came across this page:

http://digital.ni.com/public.nsf/all...256F720071DECF

It shows that the so-called "null-modem" cable is to connect a two devices
of the _same type_ together (in other words: crossing the TXD and RXD
wires), and the "straight thru" to connect a DCE to a DTE.

To be honest, I have allways though of a "null modem" cable as being the one
with just TXD and RXD (and ground ofcourse) connected to the other machine
(regardless of if it was of the same, or opposite type), with the control
lines connected back to their counterparts on the same connector.

So, it looks like we both made a mistake. :-)

P.S. I've been using null modems for 50 years ;}


I have been using them, and others of its kind for quite a while too, and
have even been known to solder a few myself. Regardless our time that we
used them, we both seem to have misremembered.

Also, age has little meaning on the "interwebz". Knowledge is the only
thing that counts here. :-)

Regards,
Rudy Wieser

P.s.
More of the same:
https://www.decisivetactics.com/supp...-or-null-modem
-vs-straight-through-serial-cable

http://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/c...tech_rs232.htm

http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/cable.html

All show a "null modem" cable to connect two devices of the same type.

I'm not sure how you ...
Scratch that. I notice all your links are to the same source.


-- Origional message:
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
On 1/18/2017 9:23 AM, R.Wieser wrote:
Richard,

The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as
I *HAD THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".


Thats the "cross over" cable I mentioned* :-)

*although a null-modem cable normally includes cross-over, it does need

to.

*NO*
A "cross over" cable connects two Ethernet ports.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium...ace#Auto_MDI-X

A "null-modem" connects two DTE or two DCE together.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_c...ting_equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_terminal_equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_modem

IOW connect COM ports of two computers to each other.

P.S. I've been using null modems for 50 years ;}
Ethernet is only ~30 years old.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet




But its still a good idea to first connect to a known-to-be-good device

(the
modem or smart switch (or anything else with a web-accessible setup) I
mentioned) so that you can see your fixed IP actually works (on both
'puters), _before_ you try that cross-over cable (I'm not sure you

realize,
but now you've introduced a _third_ location that could give you

troubles
with setting up such a 'puter-to-'puter connection).

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


-- Origional question.
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
On 1/16/2017 7:47 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA

The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as I *HAD
THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".
A USB implementation is available -
http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/163/DS_USBNMC-5030.pdf .
I'll check local suppliers.
Will also continue pursuing the LAN solution for its educational
value.






  #10  
Old January 19th 17, 07:52 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
R.Wieser
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 345
Default Alternative solution - was [ Manually setting a STATIC IP inWinXPPro]

Addendum,

I just re-read my post and see I didn't make my self too clear (excuse of
the day: It was late when I wrote it), I should have quoted an additional
line:

*NO*
A "cross over" cable connects two Ethernet ports.

....
A "null-modem" connects two DTE or two DCE together.


Those cables have the _exact same_ function, one for serial, the other for
ethernet.

And if I may point something else out, the phrase "connects two Ethernet
ports" is non-informative. Like if you would have used "two serial ports"
in the second.

Also consider that for ethernet all 'puters are comparable to DTEs from the
serial-port case, with the modems, hubs and switches taking the place of
DCEs. Maybe that makes it easier to see how both cables are effectivily the
same.

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


-- Origional message:
R.Wieser schreef in berichtnieuws
...
Richard,

*NO*

...
A "null-modem" connects two DTE or two DCE together.


As you feel that strong about it I googled to have some backup for what I
assumed to be true, and came across this page:

http://digital.ni.com/public.nsf/all...256F720071DECF

It shows that the so-called "null-modem" cable is to connect a two devices
of the _same type_ together (in other words: crossing the TXD and RXD
wires), and the "straight thru" to connect a DCE to a DTE.

To be honest, I have allways though of a "null modem" cable as being the

one
with just TXD and RXD (and ground ofcourse) connected to the other machine
(regardless of if it was of the same, or opposite type), with the control
lines connected back to their counterparts on the same connector.

So, it looks like we both made a mistake. :-)

P.S. I've been using null modems for 50 years ;}


I have been using them, and others of its kind for quite a while too, and
have even been known to solder a few myself. Regardless our time that we
used them, we both seem to have misremembered.

Also, age has little meaning on the "interwebz". Knowledge is the only
thing that counts here. :-)

Regards,
Rudy Wieser

P.s.
More of the same:

https://www.decisivetactics.com/supp...-or-null-modem
-vs-straight-through-serial-cable

http://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/c...tech_rs232.htm

http://www.columbia.edu/kermit/cable.html

All show a "null modem" cable to connect two devices of the same type.

I'm not sure how you ...
Scratch that. I notice all your links are to the same source.


-- Origional message:
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
On 1/18/2017 9:23 AM, R.Wieser wrote:
Richard,

The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as
I *HAD THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".

Thats the "cross over" cable I mentioned* :-)

*although a null-modem cable normally includes cross-over, it does

need
to.

*NO*
A "cross over" cable connects two Ethernet ports.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium...ace#Auto_MDI-X

A "null-modem" connects two DTE or two DCE together.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_c...ting_equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_terminal_equipment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Null_modem

IOW connect COM ports of two computers to each other.

P.S. I've been using null modems for 50 years ;}
Ethernet is only ~30 years old.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet




But its still a good idea to first connect to a known-to-be-good

device
(the
modem or smart switch (or anything else with a web-accessible setup) I
mentioned) so that you can see your fixed IP actually works (on both
'puters), _before_ you try that cross-over cable (I'm not sure you

realize,
but now you've introduced a _third_ location that could give you

troubles
with setting up such a 'puter-to-'puter connection).

Regards,
Rudy Wieser


-- Origional question.
Richard Owlett schreef in berichtnieuws
...
On 1/16/2017 7:47 AM, Richard Owlett wrote:
I have two Lenovo laptops. One running WinXP Pro. The other runs
Linux.
I wish to create a minimal network. It will consist of only those
two machines.
Neither will have any internet connectivity.

I've found a number of web references to setting static IP
addresses on Windows machines.
*HOWEVER* assume internet connectivity by one/both machines.

Can anyone point me to any documentation EXPLICITLY covering my
{admittedly} peculiar requirement.

TIA

The minimal network was being pursued as it was a close as I *HAD
THOUGHT* I could come to a "null modem cable".
A USB implementation is available -
http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/163/DS_USBNMC-5030.pdf .
I'll check local suppliers.
Will also continue pursuing the LAN solution for its educational
value.







 




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