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How to interpret laptop battery results.



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 2nd 17, 04:30 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Ken Springer[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,924
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

On 3/1/17 8:19 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
Let's say you run the powercfg command from the command line.

The battery design is 60,000, but the last full charge is 40,000.

Would it be accurate to say the battery has 66% or 2/3rds of it's life
left? Or is some type of sliding scale more accurate, and maybe the
battery has only 40% of it's life left?

Is there an easy to understand web site for this? I'm not sure of what
terms I should search for in this instance.


The term you want is "battery fuel gauge".

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...ery_fuel_gauge

The connector on the laptop battery has room for serial connections,
allowing the CPU to query the battery IC.

The battery capacity declines with age. When Windows says "100% full",
it means 100% of the remaining 60% or original capacity the old battery has.
You check the "hours and minutes remaining", as a means of guesstimating
the Watt-hours the battery actually holds. If you laptop used to say "three
hours" when the battery had just finished charging, maybe now it says
"two hours", under equivalent conditions. Of course, controlling the
conditions on a laptop is notoriously difficult.

Some fuel gauges, if they have not received a calibration cycle,
they count the number of times the battery have been charged,
and estimate the loss in capacity as a result. I'm sure the driver
software in Windows, cleans up any "inconsistent" information
so you won't get a scare like "105% full".

The battery IC is supposed to be "counting coulombs" or some such.
It does that, rather than using open circuit battery voltage
as some sort of indicator. Coulombs should be a better method,
than any voltage-based method.


Hi, Paul,

That's not the type of indicator I was referring to. I'm referring to
the powercfg report available with Windows.

Open a command window.

Navigate to Windows\system32.

Type powercfg -energy -output power.html

It takes a minute or so for a report, power.html, to be created in the
system32 folder. You can use the full pathnames as you desire to end up
with the output file where you would like it as well as change the name
of the report.

Open the file in whatever, search for Battery Information. Those are
the numbers I'm interested in.


The above is for Windows 7. I've read online that for 8 and 10, you
change energy to batteryinformation. I don't have access to an 8 or 10
laptop, so cannot confirm this.
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.11.6
Firefox 51.0.1 (64 bit)
Thunderbird 45.7.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
Ads
  #2  
Old March 2nd 17, 06:01 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Arnie Goetchius
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/1/17 8:19 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
Let's say you run the powercfg command from the command line.

The battery design is 60,000, but the last full charge is 40,000.

Would it be accurate to say the battery has 66% or 2/3rds of it's life
left? Or is some type of sliding scale more accurate, and maybe the
battery has only 40% of it's life left?

Is there an easy to understand web site for this? I'm not sure of what
terms I should search for in this instance.


The term you want is "battery fuel gauge".

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...ery_fuel_gauge

The connector on the laptop battery has room for serial connections,
allowing the CPU to query the battery IC.

The battery capacity declines with age. When Windows says "100% full",
it means 100% of the remaining 60% or original capacity the old battery has.
You check the "hours and minutes remaining", as a means of guesstimating
the Watt-hours the battery actually holds. If you laptop used to say "three
hours" when the battery had just finished charging, maybe now it says
"two hours", under equivalent conditions. Of course, controlling the
conditions on a laptop is notoriously difficult.

Some fuel gauges, if they have not received a calibration cycle,
they count the number of times the battery have been charged,
and estimate the loss in capacity as a result. I'm sure the driver
software in Windows, cleans up any "inconsistent" information
so you won't get a scare like "105% full".

The battery IC is supposed to be "counting coulombs" or some such.
It does that, rather than using open circuit battery voltage
as some sort of indicator. Coulombs should be a better method,
than any voltage-based method.


Hi, Paul,

That's not the type of indicator I was referring to. I'm referring to the
powercfg report available with Windows.

Open a command window.

Navigate to Windows\system32.

Type powercfg -energy -output power.html

It takes a minute or so for a report, power.html, to be created in the system32
folder. You can use the full pathnames as you desire to end up with the output
file where you would like it as well as change the name of the report.

Open the file in whatever, search for Battery Information. Those are the
numbers I'm interested in.


The above is for Windows 7. I've read online that for 8 and 10, you change
energy to batteryinformation. I don't have access to an 8 or 10 laptop, so
cannot confirm this.

I ran the "battery" option and got the following:

NAME DELL 7XFJJ4B
MANUFACTURER Sanyo
SERIAL NUMBER 8050
CHEMISTRY LION
DESIGN CAPACITY 73,260 mWh
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY 68,964 mWh
CYCLE COUNT -

Is that what you are looking for?
  #3  
Old March 2nd 17, 07:00 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Ken Springer[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,924
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

On 3/2/17 10:01 AM, Arnie Goetchius wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/1/17 8:19 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
Let's say you run the powercfg command from the command line.

The battery design is 60,000, but the last full charge is 40,000.

Would it be accurate to say the battery has 66% or 2/3rds of it's life
left? Or is some type of sliding scale more accurate, and maybe the
battery has only 40% of it's life left?

Is there an easy to understand web site for this? I'm not sure of what
terms I should search for in this instance.

The term you want is "battery fuel gauge".

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...ery_fuel_gauge

The connector on the laptop battery has room for serial connections,
allowing the CPU to query the battery IC.

The battery capacity declines with age. When Windows says "100% full",
it means 100% of the remaining 60% or original capacity the old battery has.
You check the "hours and minutes remaining", as a means of guesstimating
the Watt-hours the battery actually holds. If you laptop used to say "three
hours" when the battery had just finished charging, maybe now it says
"two hours", under equivalent conditions. Of course, controlling the
conditions on a laptop is notoriously difficult.

Some fuel gauges, if they have not received a calibration cycle,
they count the number of times the battery have been charged,
and estimate the loss in capacity as a result. I'm sure the driver
software in Windows, cleans up any "inconsistent" information
so you won't get a scare like "105% full".

The battery IC is supposed to be "counting coulombs" or some such.
It does that, rather than using open circuit battery voltage
as some sort of indicator. Coulombs should be a better method,
than any voltage-based method.


Hi, Paul,

That's not the type of indicator I was referring to. I'm referring to the
powercfg report available with Windows.

Open a command window.

Navigate to Windows\system32.

Type powercfg -energy -output power.html

It takes a minute or so for a report, power.html, to be created in the system32
folder. You can use the full pathnames as you desire to end up with the output
file where you would like it as well as change the name of the report.

Open the file in whatever, search for Battery Information. Those are the
numbers I'm interested in.


The above is for Windows 7. I've read online that for 8 and 10, you change
energy to batteryinformation. I don't have access to an 8 or 10 laptop, so
cannot confirm this.

I ran the "battery" option and got the following:

NAME DELL 7XFJJ4B
MANUFACTURER Sanyo
SERIAL NUMBER 8050
CHEMISTRY LION
DESIGN CAPACITY 73,260 mWh
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY 68,964 mWh
CYCLE COUNT -

Is that what you are looking for?


Looking for it? Nah, I found it. LOL

I'm looking for a way to interpret those numbers in "layman's terms".
How do I explain how much battery "life" is left when the battery is
used, such as in a used laptop I want to sell.

Can I say something like the battery has 94% of its expected life left?
Some kind of description/explanation the average person on the street
would understand.

--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.11.6
Firefox 51.0.1 (64 bit)
Thunderbird 45.7.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
  #4  
Old March 3rd 17, 01:29 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 837
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

In message , Ken Springer
writes:
[]
Can I say something like the battery has 94% of its expected life left?
Some kind of description/explanation the average person on the street
would understand.

Do you mean it holds 94% of the charge it held when new, or it's got 94%
of its projected life left (not likely to both be the case)? If the
latter, are you measuring that projected life in years (or months), or
in actual operating hours? (And how would you define end of life - when
capacity has dropped to 50%? 10%?)

I suspect, for any given sample of average people in the street, some
would assume you meant one of those things, some would assume you meant
another. So there probably isn't an easy answer.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A closed mouth gathers no foot.
  #5  
Old March 3rd 17, 02:12 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,246
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/2/17 10:01 AM, Arnie Goetchius wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/1/17 8:19 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
Let's say you run the powercfg command from the command line.

The battery design is 60,000, but the last full charge is 40,000.

Would it be accurate to say the battery has 66% or 2/3rds of it's life
left? Or is some type of sliding scale more accurate, and maybe the
battery has only 40% of it's life left?

Is there an easy to understand web site for this? I'm not sure of
what
terms I should search for in this instance.

The term you want is "battery fuel gauge".

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...ery_fuel_gauge

The connector on the laptop battery has room for serial connections,
allowing the CPU to query the battery IC.

The battery capacity declines with age. When Windows says "100% full",
it means 100% of the remaining 60% or original capacity the old
battery has.
You check the "hours and minutes remaining", as a means of
guesstimating
the Watt-hours the battery actually holds. If you laptop used to say
"three
hours" when the battery had just finished charging, maybe now it says
"two hours", under equivalent conditions. Of course, controlling the
conditions on a laptop is notoriously difficult.

Some fuel gauges, if they have not received a calibration cycle,
they count the number of times the battery have been charged,
and estimate the loss in capacity as a result. I'm sure the driver
software in Windows, cleans up any "inconsistent" information
so you won't get a scare like "105% full".

The battery IC is supposed to be "counting coulombs" or some such.
It does that, rather than using open circuit battery voltage
as some sort of indicator. Coulombs should be a better method,
than any voltage-based method.

Hi, Paul,

That's not the type of indicator I was referring to. I'm referring
to the
powercfg report available with Windows.

Open a command window.

Navigate to Windows\system32.

Type powercfg -energy -output power.html

It takes a minute or so for a report, power.html, to be created in
the system32
folder. You can use the full pathnames as you desire to end up with
the output
file where you would like it as well as change the name of the report.

Open the file in whatever, search for Battery Information. Those are
the
numbers I'm interested in.


The above is for Windows 7. I've read online that for 8 and 10, you
change
energy to batteryinformation. I don't have access to an 8 or 10
laptop, so
cannot confirm this.

I ran the "battery" option and got the following:

NAME DELL 7XFJJ4B
MANUFACTURER Sanyo
SERIAL NUMBER 8050
CHEMISTRY LION
DESIGN CAPACITY 73,260 mWh
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY 68,964 mWh
CYCLE COUNT -

Is that what you are looking for?


Looking for it? Nah, I found it. LOL

I'm looking for a way to interpret those numbers in "layman's terms".
How do I explain how much battery "life" is left when the battery is
used, such as in a used laptop I want to sell.

Can I say something like the battery has 94% of its expected life left?
Some kind of description/explanation the average person on the street
would understand.


http://www.techrepublic.com/article/...will-tell-you/

DESIGN CAPACITY mWh when it was new
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY mWh it holds when 100% now

That article has a bit more info.

Paul
  #6  
Old March 3rd 17, 03:13 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Rene Lamontagne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,096
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

On 3/2/2017 7:12 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/2/17 10:01 AM, Arnie Goetchius wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/1/17 8:19 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
Let's say you run the powercfg command from the command line.

The battery design is 60,000, but the last full charge is 40,000.

Would it be accurate to say the battery has 66% or 2/3rds of it's
life
left? Or is some type of sliding scale more accurate, and maybe the
battery has only 40% of it's life left?

Is there an easy to understand web site for this? I'm not sure of
what
terms I should search for in this instance.

The term you want is "battery fuel gauge".

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...ery_fuel_gauge

The connector on the laptop battery has room for serial connections,
allowing the CPU to query the battery IC.

The battery capacity declines with age. When Windows says "100% full",
it means 100% of the remaining 60% or original capacity the old
battery has.
You check the "hours and minutes remaining", as a means of
guesstimating
the Watt-hours the battery actually holds. If you laptop used to
say "three
hours" when the battery had just finished charging, maybe now it says
"two hours", under equivalent conditions. Of course, controlling the
conditions on a laptop is notoriously difficult.

Some fuel gauges, if they have not received a calibration cycle,
they count the number of times the battery have been charged,
and estimate the loss in capacity as a result. I'm sure the driver
software in Windows, cleans up any "inconsistent" information
so you won't get a scare like "105% full".

The battery IC is supposed to be "counting coulombs" or some such.
It does that, rather than using open circuit battery voltage
as some sort of indicator. Coulombs should be a better method,
than any voltage-based method.

Hi, Paul,

That's not the type of indicator I was referring to. I'm referring
to the
powercfg report available with Windows.

Open a command window.

Navigate to Windows\system32.

Type powercfg -energy -output power.html

It takes a minute or so for a report, power.html, to be created in
the system32
folder. You can use the full pathnames as you desire to end up with
the output
file where you would like it as well as change the name of the report.

Open the file in whatever, search for Battery Information. Those
are the
numbers I'm interested in.


The above is for Windows 7. I've read online that for 8 and 10, you
change
energy to batteryinformation. I don't have access to an 8 or 10
laptop, so
cannot confirm this.
I ran the "battery" option and got the following:

NAME DELL 7XFJJ4B
MANUFACTURER Sanyo
SERIAL NUMBER 8050
CHEMISTRY LION
DESIGN CAPACITY 73,260 mWh
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY 68,964 mWh
CYCLE COUNT -

Is that what you are looking for?


Looking for it? Nah, I found it. LOL

I'm looking for a way to interpret those numbers in "layman's terms".
How do I explain how much battery "life" is left when the battery is
used, such as in a used laptop I want to sell.

Can I say something like the battery has 94% of its expected life
left? Some kind of description/explanation the average person on the
street would understand.


http://www.techrepublic.com/article/...will-tell-you/


DESIGN CAPACITY mWh when it was new
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY mWh it holds when 100% now

That article has a bit more info.

Paul



That was a very interesting and informative article Paul, I applied it
to my Win 8.1 10 inch D2 tablet and the results where very enlightening.

The design figure was 29,600 MWH , but the 100 % full charge capacity
was 34,800 MWH, the battery must be better than specs tend to show,
much better than expected on about 18 month old tablet, Although I have
to admit it is hardly used very often.

Rene



  #7  
Old March 3rd 17, 05:49 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Ken Springer[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,924
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

On 3/2/17 6:12 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/2/17 10:01 AM, Arnie Goetchius wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
On 3/1/17 8:19 PM, Paul wrote:
Ken Springer wrote:
Let's say you run the powercfg command from the command line.

The battery design is 60,000, but the last full charge is 40,000.

Would it be accurate to say the battery has 66% or 2/3rds of it's life
left? Or is some type of sliding scale more accurate, and maybe the
battery has only 40% of it's life left?

Is there an easy to understand web site for this? I'm not sure of
what
terms I should search for in this instance.

The term you want is "battery fuel gauge".

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a...ery_fuel_gauge

The connector on the laptop battery has room for serial connections,
allowing the CPU to query the battery IC.

The battery capacity declines with age. When Windows says "100% full",
it means 100% of the remaining 60% or original capacity the old
battery has.
You check the "hours and minutes remaining", as a means of
guesstimating
the Watt-hours the battery actually holds. If you laptop used to say
"three
hours" when the battery had just finished charging, maybe now it says
"two hours", under equivalent conditions. Of course, controlling the
conditions on a laptop is notoriously difficult.

Some fuel gauges, if they have not received a calibration cycle,
they count the number of times the battery have been charged,
and estimate the loss in capacity as a result. I'm sure the driver
software in Windows, cleans up any "inconsistent" information
so you won't get a scare like "105% full".

The battery IC is supposed to be "counting coulombs" or some such.
It does that, rather than using open circuit battery voltage
as some sort of indicator. Coulombs should be a better method,
than any voltage-based method.

Hi, Paul,

That's not the type of indicator I was referring to. I'm referring
to the
powercfg report available with Windows.

Open a command window.

Navigate to Windows\system32.

Type powercfg -energy -output power.html

It takes a minute or so for a report, power.html, to be created in
the system32
folder. You can use the full pathnames as you desire to end up with
the output
file where you would like it as well as change the name of the report.

Open the file in whatever, search for Battery Information. Those are
the
numbers I'm interested in.


The above is for Windows 7. I've read online that for 8 and 10, you
change
energy to batteryinformation. I don't have access to an 8 or 10
laptop, so
cannot confirm this.
I ran the "battery" option and got the following:

NAME DELL 7XFJJ4B
MANUFACTURER Sanyo
SERIAL NUMBER 8050
CHEMISTRY LION
DESIGN CAPACITY 73,260 mWh
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY 68,964 mWh
CYCLE COUNT -

Is that what you are looking for?


Looking for it? Nah, I found it. LOL

I'm looking for a way to interpret those numbers in "layman's terms".
How do I explain how much battery "life" is left when the battery is
used, such as in a used laptop I want to sell.

Can I say something like the battery has 94% of its expected life left?
Some kind of description/explanation the average person on the street
would understand.


http://www.techrepublic.com/article/...will-tell-you/

DESIGN CAPACITY mWh when it was new
FULL CHARGE CAPACITY mWh it holds when 100% now

That article has a bit more info.


It looks like batteryreport provides more info that the version in W7.
I'll have to compare the reports when I get a chance.

I do the command line to put the report on my desktop, so it's easy to
drag and drop to where it will be permanently stored in a cloud application.

But I'm still a bit perplexed as to how to accurately, and simply,
explain to someone the current status of a used battery. Maybe I could
say something like "The battery has X% of it's design life left."

A couple months ago I did some research on how to maximize the life of
your battery.
I created a single page doc on taking care of your laptop battery. Main
points are as follows:

Simple ways to make your battery last longer...
1. Do not charge your battery to 100%. Heat is the enemy of battery
life, and charging to full charge creates internal heat in the battery,
which shortens the life of the battery.
2. Do not fully discharge your battery by letting it die.
3. Try to keep your battery charged to between 40%-70%.
4. Try to keep your battery at room temperature. So don’t leave your
computer in a hot or cold car, for example.
5. If your AC adapter (charger) fails, ensure the replacement charger
matches or exceeds the specifications of the original charger. Also see
if you can determine if the charger you are buying includes some safety
circuits, such as a temperature sensor that shuts the charger down in
case the charger gets too hot. That will prevent the charger itself from
failing.

--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.11.6
Firefox 51.0.1 (64 bit)
Thunderbird 45.7.1
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
  #8  
Old March 3rd 17, 07:33 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,246
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

Ken Springer wrote:

A couple months ago I did some research on how to maximize the life of
your battery.
I created a single page doc on taking care of your laptop battery. Main
points are as follows:

Simple ways to make your battery last longer...
1. Do not charge your battery to 100%. Heat is the enemy of battery
life, and charging to full charge creates internal heat in the battery,
which shortens the life of the battery.


http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a..._ion_batteries

"Some Li-ion packs may experience a temperature rise of about 5ºC (9ºF)
when reaching full charge. This could be due to the protection circuit
and/or elevated internal resistance. Discontinue using the battery or
charger if the temperature rises more than 10ºC (18ºF) under moderate
charging speeds."

"Li-ion cannot absorb overcharge. When fully charged, the charge current
must be cut off. A continuous trickle charge would cause plating of
metallic lithium and compromise safety. To minimize stress, keep the
lithium-ion battery at the peak cut-off as short as possible.

Once the charge is terminated, the battery voltage begins to drop.
This eases the voltage stress. Over time, the open circuit voltage
will settle to between 3.70V and 3.90V/cell. Note that a Li-ion battery
that has received a fully saturated charge will keep the voltage
elevated for a longer than one that has not received a saturation charge."

The necessary behaviors are handled by the internal chip in the laptop
in charge of doing the charging. A well-matched battery chemistry, along
with the right settings on the charger chip, ensures carefree operation.

On the other hand, the article here talks of "thermal runaway".

http://www.batteryuniversity.com/lea...of_lithium_ion

The article here, has a graphic. It's when the charger goes "out of bounds"
that the trouble begins. The charger (a chip inside the laptop), has to be
matched to the battery chemistry. Buying a cheap replacement battery, which
happened to have the wrong chemistry, could promote this kind of failure.
You're relying on the guy in China, putting the right cells in
your cheap replacement. And with Cobalt, there can be some slight
differences. For the guy building the packs, he should have
datasheets for both products in front of him, to verify they're
correct.

http://www.mpoweruk.com/lithium_failures.htm

So under normal circumstances, the battery experiences negligible
self-heating at full charge, and the charging stops after the topping
up phase. You may feel a warm spot in the laptop, but that should
be in the power management area, not the battery.

2. Do not fully discharge your battery by letting it die.


The laptop will shutdown at 0% charge, so the battery is not
immediately un-chargeable. However, if you leave a pack that is
at zero percent in that state for too long, the self-discharge
of the pack (not the load from the laptop), will take it below
the safe charging voltage level. And then the charging chip
will simply refuse to charge it, for safety reasons. The pack
must then be replaced. (And if you're an idiot, you drill into
the pack and apply a charge to the cells, you could start a fire.)

In summary, running the battery to 0% is perfectly safe... as
long as you recharge it in a reasonable time after it happened.
And this is not always under your control. The computer can
do this on its own, while you would assume there is "fuel left
in it".

This happened to me just recently - the puzzle was, how did the
laptop discharge the battery ? It was maybe 50-60% full when shut
down, and it read 0% when I tried to use it two weeks later.
(I always check for the flashing sleep LED - it wasn't sleeping.)
The OS was Windows 10... I suspect the computer came on,
with the lid closed. Task scheduler. My new policy from
now on (like right now as I type), is to pull the pack
from that thing. It's self discharge properties are
still pretty good.

3. Try to keep your battery charged to between 40%-70%.


Sounds good. Promotes longer battery life in years.

4. Try to keep your battery at room temperature. So don’t leave your
computer in a hot or cold car, for example.


In particular, a well-designed charger chip, will refuse to
charge Li at low temperature. If your laptop comes in from
a -20C car, let it warm up to room temp before plugging it
in for charging. There is a limited temperature range for
proper charging, and it's up to that charger chip to enforce
the rules.

5. If your AC adapter (charger) fails, ensure the replacement charger
matches or exceeds the specifications of the original charger. Also see
if you can determine if the charger you are buying includes some safety
circuits, such as a temperature sensor that shuts the charger down in
case the charger gets too hot. That will prevent the charger itself from
failing.


At the very least, it should match on DC voltage. Replace an 18.5V
adapter with an 18.5V adapter. Typical rules are +/- 0.5V. Use a multimeter
if you suspect the "universal" replacement you got isn't right for the job.
If a universal adapter only has a "low/high" switch, you'd better check
the output voltage.

Paul
  #9  
Old March 4th 17, 03:50 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows-8,alt.windows7.general
Ken Springer[_2_]
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Posts: 2,924
Default How to interpret laptop battery results.

On 3/2/17 5:29 PM, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Ken Springer
writes:
[]
Can I say something like the battery has 94% of its expected life left?
Some kind of description/explanation the average person on the street
would understand.

Do you mean it holds 94% of the charge it held when new, or it's got 94%
of its projected life left (not likely to both be the case)? If the
latter, are you measuring that projected life in years (or months), or
in actual operating hours? (And how would you define end of life - when
capacity has dropped to 50%? 10%?)

I suspect, for any given sample of average people in the street, some
would assume you meant one of those things, some would assume you meant
another. So there probably isn't an easy answer.


I don't think the average person would know the difference. The average
computer user is not that knowledgeable in my experience.

I do suspect that most would go with the projected life left in actual
operating hours.


--
Ken
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