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  #16  
Old Yesterday, 10:34 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Robert in CA
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default Win7 support:



I want to thank everyone else who has posted,
rest assured I do read all the posts its just
that Paul knows my situation very well and
helped create my backup system and has helped
me quite a bit in the past.

Thanks again,
Robert
Ads
  #17  
Old Yesterday, 10:54 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,612
Default Win7 support:

In message ,
Robert in CA writes:
[]
I think I understand,... were actually going after the
registration key for Windows 10 without actually installing
Win 10. Is that correct? Then at a later date I can install


Not quite. In order to get your machine registered on the Microsoft
servers as being entitled to run W10, you have to actually install W10.
But you can revert to 7 immediately, by any means you like (the simplest
probably being by putting back the drive you cloned before you started
the "upgrade").

Win 10 side by side with Win 7 so I can continue to use Win 7
but can also use Win 10 if I choose. Do I have that right?


More or less.

I do have a spare drive so that's not a problem. I will have to
re-read your instructions on how to do this. True, I have done
repairs before but only with your guidance and help. I need to
take this slowly so I understand what I'm doing and not mess
anything up.

Robert


If you have only _one_ spare drive (and two computers currently running
7), then:

A1. Clone computer 1 (a 780?) onto the spare drive. (If you want to be
doubly sure all is well, swap in the spare and make sure it still boots,
i. e. to make sure you have made a valid clone.)
A2. Do the upgrade to 10. MAKE SURE IT IS ACTIVATED (or whatever the
right term is); see Paul's image for how to do that.
A3. Return computer 1 to W7 - either by restoring from the clone, or
just using it, if it's similar in size to the original.

B1/2/3 - as above, for computer 2 (a 4500?), using whichever drive is
spare at this point.

Provided both computers show their W10 installation is valid,
registered, activated, or whatever the right term is (I can never
remember which is which), you can go back to running 7 on them, then
switch to 10 later (or to dual-boot I think, which is more complicated).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I'm the oldest woman on primetime not baking cakes.
- Anne Robinson, RT 2015/8/15-21
  #18  
Old Today, 01:37 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Robert in CA
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default Win7 support:

On Friday, June 14, 2019 at 11:45:48 AM UTC-7, Paul wrote:
Robert in CA wrote:
I have a Dell XPS 8500, with Windows 7 Professional, SP1,
with Spywareblaster, Malwarebytes, Avast , Windows Defender
and Windows firewall.

(1) TB HD
Intel (R) Core (TM) i7-33-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz
Ram 12.0 GB
System type : 64-bit operating system

I also have

I have a Dell Optiplex 780 Tower, with Windows 7 Professional,
SP1, with Spywareblaster, Malwarebytes, Avast , Windows Defender
and Windows firewall.

Seagate Desktop HDD ST2000DM001 2TB 64MB
Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"
System type : 64-bit operating system

and (external hard drives)

(8500)
WD BLACK SERIES WD2003FZEX 2TB 7200
RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal
Hard Drive

(780)
Seagate Desktop HDD ST2000DM001 2TB 64MB
Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"
Internal Hard Drive


With Win7 support ending on Jan 14,2020
how will that affect my computer's not
being able download security updates etc.?

Thanks,
Robert


Let's make a list:

Security Updates no longer made for Windows 7 = No lengthy Windows Updates
You AV fleet offers some coverage.

Fleet of AV scanners you own = Supported for now, support gradually dropping away
after a couple of years. The extent of the "danger"
is a function of how many scrapes you and the
computer have got into, over the years. Only you
know how reckless you've been clicking stuff with
the computer mouse...

New versions of Web Browsers magically won't run on Windows 7 = It's hard to imagine
this happening. It would
take a concerted effort
from MS to do this.

*******

I could switch to Windows 10 for free = Yeah, you could, but:
1) Have to prepare for it.
2) Win10 is more of a pain in the ass
3) Win10 is more nosy. You have to remember to
program all the sliders to OFF.
4) Microsoft rates its maintenance activity as
more important than you being able to use
the computer.
5) The 8500 will comfortably run Win10.
The 780 meets the requirements but
isn't a powerhouse when running Win10.
The 780 would run Win10 like my typing
machine runs Win10 - when Windows Defender
goes crazy, the browsing could be a little
slow.

To make a transition plan, you have to figure out how desirable
Win10 is, and what config to use for 8500 and 780.

8500 780
+------------------+ +------------------+
| Win10 over top | | Win7 (unchanged) |
| of Win7 | | |
+------------------+ +------------------+

8500 780
+------------------+-------------------+ +------------------+
| Win7 (unchanged) | Win10 beside Win7 | | Win7 (unchanged) |
| | (dual boot setup) | | |
+------------------+-------------------+ +------------------+

And then there would be more diagrams, where we had the same sort of
options for the 780.

When you dual boot, the bootup can be slower. When you boot
the "non-default" OS, the machine basically has to restart
twice. It can feel like the process takes two minutes.

"Win10 over top of Win7" is easy.

1) Make backup of OS drive to separate backup drive.
This is your safety backup, in case something happens.

2) https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/soft...load/windows10

Get MediaCreationTool, if your machine has Win7 Professional
you order up Win10 Professional x64. If your machine has
Win7 Home Premium, you order up Win10 Home x64 disc. The
1903 image on offer, has a total of seven OS flavors, of which
both of the flavors you need, will be on the one disc.

3) With Windows 7 running, mount the downloaded ISO9660 file that
MediaCreationTool got for you. 3,967,483,904 bytes.

But this article tells you that Win7 doesn't have a native mounter.
While Win8.1 and Win10 do. You'll need to burn a DVD then, for sure,
and the DVD will also come in handy for "clean installs".

https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...windows-vista/

Once the DVD is burned, open the DVD in File Explorer until
you see Setup.exe and double click it. If all goes well,
in an hour or two, you'll see a Windows 10 OS. There should be
no boot menu in this case, because by running Setup.exe, we've
done a "Win10 over Win7" install.

When it asks for an account, the OS is "sneaky", and tries to
rope you into giving up an email address. Use "Offline account"
in the bottom left hand corner.

https://www.tenforums.com/attachment...10-a-msa-1.jpg

*******

The other kind of install, is to install Windows 10 beside
Windows 7, so that both OSes are available from a boot menu.

For one of those, you boot from the DVD using your computer
popup boot menu, then select the "Custom" option and tell the
computer that the blank partition you prepared for it, is
where the OS is supposed to go. This requires using a
Partition Manager application in advance, shrinking C:
(you can do that from Disk Management actually), and
creating a partition for Windows 10. If you use a 30GB
partition, the installer will compress a lot of materials,
which isn't good. If you used an 80GB partition, that's
probably enough that it won't be "cranky".

And we don't need to boot this DVD in UEFI mode, because
your setups are legacy MBR and BIOS setups (UEFI+CSM BIOS
would do, or a traditional legacy BIOS would work). I think
your setup is utterly conventional, so I don't have to
address a bunch of options.

+-----+-----------------------------+
| MBR | Win7 | === shrink C:
+-----+-----------------------------+

+-----+---------------+-------------+
| MBR | Win7 | 80GB Win10 | === create an empty 80GB partition
+-----+---------------+-------------+

Boot Win10 DVD and install. Type license key
into activation dialog.

This web page will answer a lot of your questions
about installing side-by-side by booting the DVD
and doing a "clean install into a partition". If you
were to accept standard options and not use Custom,
it might "blow away" Windows 7 instead. You have to
tell it what you want to do, for it to work out well.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...dows-10-a.html

Now, I know this post is not in the level of detail you
expect. I think you have the skill level to do it, but
there are bound to be some rough edges where you get
in trouble. So, you'd only modify one machine at
a time, and use the second machine to dial out for
help.

As they say at the mechanics shop "you can pay me now or
you can pay me later, but you'll pay me". Microsoft is
like that mechanic, sitting in the corner snickering
as you try to set this stuff up. It's a lot of nuisance
just so you can have maintenance and continuity.

Oh, and with your fleet of AVs, you'll likely need to
uninstall Avira or Avast before doing some flavors of
installation, as they can interfere with an install.
This is most likely to happen in the "Win10 over Win7"
case. The other stuff, like some "SpywareScanner", is less
likely to blow up the install.

Many install failures will roll back on their own if
there is trouble. But, rollback takes an hour or two
of disk grinding activity, and is "plenty annoying".
I only put up with a rollback once, just to prove it
works. I usually cut them off at the knees, and restore
from backup, because that's a few minutes faster for me.

So that's the situation.

Paul




On Friday, June 14, 2019 at 11:45:48 AM UTC-7, Paul wrote:
Robert in CA wrote:
I have a Dell XPS 8500, with Windows 7 Professional, SP1,
with Spywareblaster, Malwarebytes, Avast , Windows Defender
and Windows firewall.

(1) TB HD
Intel (R) Core (TM) i7-33-3770 CPU @ 3.40 GHz
Ram 12.0 GB
System type : 64-bit operating system

I also have

I have a Dell Optiplex 780 Tower, with Windows 7 Professional,
SP1, with Spywareblaster, Malwarebytes, Avast , Windows Defender
and Windows firewall.

Seagate Desktop HDD ST2000DM001 2TB 64MB
Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"
System type : 64-bit operating system

and (external hard drives)

(8500)
WD BLACK SERIES WD2003FZEX 2TB 7200
RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal
Hard Drive

(780)
Seagate Desktop HDD ST2000DM001 2TB 64MB
Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"
Internal Hard Drive


With Win7 support ending on Jan 14,2020
how will that affect my computer's not
being able download security updates etc.?

Thanks,
Robert


Let's make a list:

Security Updates no longer made for Windows 7 = No lengthy Windows Updates
You AV fleet offers some coverage.

Fleet of AV scanners you own = Supported for now, support gradually dropping away
after a couple of years. The extent of the "danger"
is a function of how many scrapes you and the
computer have got into, over the years. Only you
know how reckless you've been clicking stuff with
the computer mouse...

New versions of Web Browsers magically won't run on Windows 7 = It's hard to imagine
this happening. It would
take a concerted effort
from MS to do this.

*******

I could switch to Windows 10 for free = Yeah, you could, but:
1) Have to prepare for it.
2) Win10 is more of a pain in the ass
3) Win10 is more nosy. You have to remember to
program all the sliders to OFF.
4) Microsoft rates its maintenance activity as
more important than you being able to use
the computer.
5) The 8500 will comfortably run Win10.
The 780 meets the requirements but
isn't a powerhouse when running Win10.
The 780 would run Win10 like my typing
machine runs Win10 - when Windows Defender
goes crazy, the browsing could be a little
slow.

To make a transition plan, you have to figure out how desirable
Win10 is, and what config to use for 8500 and 780.

8500 780
+------------------+ +------------------+
| Win10 over top | | Win7 (unchanged) |
| of Win7 | | |
+------------------+ +------------------+

8500 780
+------------------+-------------------+ +------------------+
| Win7 (unchanged) | Win10 beside Win7 | | Win7 (unchanged) |
| | (dual boot setup) | | |
+------------------+-------------------+ +------------------+

And then there would be more diagrams, where we had the same sort of
options for the 780.

When you dual boot, the bootup can be slower. When you boot
the "non-default" OS, the machine basically has to restart
twice. It can feel like the process takes two minutes.

"Win10 over top of Win7" is easy.

1) Make backup of OS drive to separate backup drive.
This is your safety backup, in case something happens.

2) https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/soft...load/windows10

Get MediaCreationTool, if your machine has Win7 Professional
you order up Win10 Professional x64. If your machine has
Win7 Home Premium, you order up Win10 Home x64 disc. The
1903 image on offer, has a total of seven OS flavors, of which
both of the flavors you need, will be on the one disc.

3) With Windows 7 running, mount the downloaded ISO9660 file that
MediaCreationTool got for you. 3,967,483,904 bytes.

But this article tells you that Win7 doesn't have a native mounter.
While Win8.1 and Win10 do. You'll need to burn a DVD then, for sure,
and the DVD will also come in handy for "clean installs".

https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...windows-vista/

Once the DVD is burned, open the DVD in File Explorer until
you see Setup.exe and double click it. If all goes well,
in an hour or two, you'll see a Windows 10 OS. There should be
no boot menu in this case, because by running Setup.exe, we've
done a "Win10 over Win7" install.

When it asks for an account, the OS is "sneaky", and tries to
rope you into giving up an email address. Use "Offline account"
in the bottom left hand corner.

https://www.tenforums.com/attachment...10-a-msa-1.jpg

*******

The other kind of install, is to install Windows 10 beside
Windows 7, so that both OSes are available from a boot menu.

For one of those, you boot from the DVD using your computer
popup boot menu, then select the "Custom" option and tell the
computer that the blank partition you prepared for it, is
where the OS is supposed to go. This requires using a
Partition Manager application in advance, shrinking C:
(you can do that from Disk Management actually), and
creating a partition for Windows 10. If you use a 30GB
partition, the installer will compress a lot of materials,
which isn't good. If you used an 80GB partition, that's
probably enough that it won't be "cranky".

And we don't need to boot this DVD in UEFI mode, because
your setups are legacy MBR and BIOS setups (UEFI+CSM BIOS
would do, or a traditional legacy BIOS would work). I think
your setup is utterly conventional, so I don't have to
address a bunch of options.

+-----+-----------------------------+
| MBR | Win7 | === shrink C:
+-----+-----------------------------+

+-----+---------------+-------------+
| MBR | Win7 | 80GB Win10 | === create an empty 80GB partition
+-----+---------------+-------------+

Boot Win10 DVD and install. Type license key
into activation dialog.

This web page will answer a lot of your questions
about installing side-by-side by booting the DVD
and doing a "clean install into a partition". If you
were to accept standard options and not use Custom,
it might "blow away" Windows 7 instead. You have to
tell it what you want to do, for it to work out well.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...dows-10-a.html

Now, I know this post is not in the level of detail you
expect. I think you have the skill level to do it, but
there are bound to be some rough edges where you get
in trouble. So, you'd only modify one machine at
a time, and use the second machine to dial out for
help.

As they say at the mechanics shop "you can pay me now or
you can pay me later, but you'll pay me". Microsoft is
like that mechanic, sitting in the corner snickering
as you try to set this stuff up. It's a lot of nuisance
just so you can have maintenance and continuity.

Oh, and with your fleet of AVs, you'll likely need to
uninstall Avira or Avast before doing some flavors of
installation, as they can interfere with an install.
This is most likely to happen in the "Win10 over Win7"
case. The other stuff, like some "SpywareScanner", is less
likely to blow up the install.

Many install failures will roll back on their own if
there is trouble. But, rollback takes an hour or two
of disk grinding activity, and is "plenty annoying".
I only put up with a rollback once, just to prove it
works. I usually cut them off at the knees, and restore
from backup, because that's a few minutes faster for me.

So that's the situation.

Paul


I started to re-read your instructions,.. so 'if' I want
to install Win 10 side by side Win 7 do I still need to
get the Media Creation tool? Also I did not see clearly where
I'm suppose to download for making a Win 8 DVD. Am I using that
DVD to boot into custom?

I need to know how to configure my partition if I'm going to do
this and where am I downloading Win 10 to put in the partition?
So far I've only loaded the Win8 CD to get to custom settings.

I make monthly backups so that's no problem but creating new
partitions etc. I'm still unsure of Win10 and as you pointed
out Win10 has allot of problems which is why I wish to have Win7
and Win10 side by side so that I can continue to use Win 7 for
as long as possible. I wish Microsoft would leave well enough alone.


Thanks,
Robert
Robert
  #19  
Old Today, 06:18 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,804
Default Win7 support:

wrote:
On Sat, 15 Jun 2019 15:17:19 -0400, Paul
wrote:

Robert in CA wrote:

So if I put Win 10 over Win 7 I will be
actually operating Win 10 and won't even
see Win 7 anymore correct?

That's correct. Windows 7 is thrown into C:\Windows.old
and after ten days, the file set in there is deleted
automatically by Windows 10. For that ten day period, there
is a "revert" button you can use, to uninstall Windows 10
and move Windows.old to Windows (logically speaking).

By and large, ignoring those details, when you do
"Win10 over Win7", then Windows 7 is gone.

It's the "Windows 10 beside Windows 7" option
that makes both OSes available, but takes up
extra space, because there are two separate
partitions that function as a C: when they're in use.

Perhaps a wise man would copy that onto some portable media and stuff
it away. (assuming you could restore it and "revert")

I am still a huge fan of using another drive to install a new OS,
putting my original in a safe place. (or making a clone if it is an
upgrade situation). Then you are simply swapping a cable to "revert".
I have changed my old XT drive in this machine to "C:" a couple times
now.


No, don't do that :-)

A backup of the original Win7 setup is safer for
the purposes of "revert".

Note that there have been reports of revert not
being "perfect", and sometimes your programs
go missing!

Paul
  #20  
Old Today, 06:30 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
No_Name
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 582
Default Win7 support:

On Sun, 16 Jun 2019 01:18:38 -0400, Paul
wrote:

wrote:
On Sat, 15 Jun 2019 15:17:19 -0400, Paul
wrote:

Robert in CA wrote:

So if I put Win 10 over Win 7 I will be
actually operating Win 10 and won't even
see Win 7 anymore correct?
That's correct. Windows 7 is thrown into C:\Windows.old
and after ten days, the file set in there is deleted
automatically by Windows 10. For that ten day period, there
is a "revert" button you can use, to uninstall Windows 10
and move Windows.old to Windows (logically speaking).

By and large, ignoring those details, when you do
"Win10 over Win7", then Windows 7 is gone.

It's the "Windows 10 beside Windows 7" option
that makes both OSes available, but takes up
extra space, because there are two separate
partitions that function as a C: when they're in use.

Perhaps a wise man would copy that onto some portable media and stuff
it away. (assuming you could restore it and "revert")

I am still a huge fan of using another drive to install a new OS,
putting my original in a safe place. (or making a clone if it is an
upgrade situation). Then you are simply swapping a cable to "revert".
I have changed my old XT drive in this machine to "C:" a couple times
now.


No, don't do that :-)

A backup of the original Win7 setup is safer for
the purposes of "revert".

Note that there have been reports of revert not
being "perfect", and sometimes your programs
go missing!

Paul


I didn't do anything to the 7 drive. I just booted the XP drive, did
what I wanted to do (mostly recovering stuff) and plugged the 7 back
in.
BTW I still have not found the missing link to get that NFPA program
running so I am thinking it might be in a hidden registry entry like
you suggested.
  #21  
Old Today, 06:31 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,804
Default Win7 support:

Robert in CA wrote:

I think I understand,... were actually going after the
registration key for Windows 10 without actually installing
Win 10. Is that correct? Then at a later date I can install
Win 10 side by side with Win 7 so I can continue to use Win 7
but can also use Win 10 if I choose. Do I have that right?

I do have a spare drive so that's not a problem. I will have to
re-read your instructions on how to do this. True, I have done
repairs before but only with your guidance and help. I need to
take this slowly so I understand what I'm doing and not mess
anything up.

Robert


Because this effort is largely "throwaway",
that's why I suggested cloning the existing C:
drive over to the spare you have, so that when
the Win10 install is finished on the spare, the
spare can be erased.

All that the exercise does, is create the license
key on the Microsoft server, which will be used
at a later date. Since the serial numbers on the
computer won't change, if Win10 is ever installed
again, now it will have a key waiting for it,
to complete activation.

When you have "Win10 over Win7" booted, you can
try out the menus and so on. Before you wave goodbye
to it, shut down Win10 (from the power button thing
in the menus), take out the spare drive, and put
the original drive (with Win7) back in the machine.
So that nothing is changed.

While installing Windows 10 (using setup.exe off
the DVD since there is no ISO mounter in Win7), only
the spare drive should be present and plugged in.
This is to ensure nothing can harm the original
drive while this install happens.

You want to do the procedure on both machines,
so there is a 8500-specific key for the 8500
and a 780-specific key for the 780.

And based on the day I've had today, I'm getting
less and less interested in foisting Win10 on you :-)
I had a lot of trouble today, backing up Win10
with Macrium. I had to update my 6.3 version of
Macrium to 6.3.1685 so that a backup of Win10 1903
would complete. Until I did that, I was getting
"Error 9".

And even after upgrading the OS version from 1809
to 1903, the EventViewer still wouldn't work properly.
But in small print, I saw which file it was complaining
about, a view_1.xml file, that when I deleted it,
the EventViewer custom view started working again.

Just about everything I do, I'm fixin stuff...

Paul
  #22  
Old Today, 06:49 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,804
Default Win7 support:

Robert in CA wrote:


I started to re-read your instructions,.. so 'if' I want
to install Win 10 side by side Win 7 do I still need to
get the Media Creation tool? Also I did not see clearly where
I'm suppose to download for making a Win 8 DVD. Am I using that
DVD to boot into custom?

I need to know how to configure my partition if I'm going to do
this and where am I downloading Win 10 to put in the partition?
So far I've only loaded the Win8 CD to get to custom settings.

I make monthly backups so that's no problem but creating new
partitions etc. I'm still unsure of Win10 and as you pointed
out Win10 has allot of problems which is why I wish to have Win7
and Win10 side by side so that I can continue to use Win 7 for
as long as possible. I wish Microsoft would leave well enough alone.


Thanks,
Robert
Robert


1) You do *not* need a Win8 DVD.
Not once is Windows 8 mentioned in any of these procedures!
Relax :-)

2) Using the MediaCreationTool, you can make a DVD.
The problem is, if you just downloaded the ISO9660 file,
Windows 7 doesn't have a built-in ISO mounter. Otherwise,
if it did, I could save you on wasting one blank DVD
to make an installer DVD. By making the DVD, you'll
have media you can boot for emergencies (you can run
CHKDSK from there, something I was doing today).

The MediaCreationTool can do three things:

Make a USB stick with Win10 installer on it.

Make a DVD with Win10 installer on it (I think
it uses IMAP2 for that, and the missing feature
from IMAP2, is I don't think it knows how to
erase DVD-RW or DVD+RW. But it should work with
DVD-R or DVD+R, as far as I know.

Just save as an ISO9660 file = Windows10.iso

The DVD is relatively slow, but so is the decompressor
on the CPU, so it really isn't a disadvantage to make the DVD
for this. It only ****es people off, it isn't such a bad
format after all.

3) When the day comes that you want to do "side-by-side"
install, you'll already have your key generated in advance,
so the install will automatically activate.

To do side-by-side, you need to:

a) shrink the existing C: to a smaller size.
Give Win10, say, 100GB of space.
b) In the gap opened by shrinking C:, create
an NTFS partition using Disk Management.
You can label it Windows10 if you want, but
the installer will only erase the partition
and remove the label, so don't get too attached
to your custom label. You can put the label back
later.
c) Now that those steps have been done using the
Windows 7 OS, now the real install starts.
Shut down Windows 7.
d) Power up the machine and insert the Win10 DVD.
Follow the instructions until you see a Custom option.

https://www.tenforums.com/attachment...windows_10.jpg

( https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...dows-10-a.html )

e) Highlight the blank partition. There might be three
other partitions related to your previous setup. The
fourth partition is where Windows 10 will go.

https://www.tenforums.com/attachment...-10-a-uefi.jpg

Note that it is highly likely that there won't be
enough partitions. Don't panic. You can make an
Extended/Logical for Windows 10. Only the first OS
has to go into a Primary partition. Other OSes can
go into Logical partitions. It's the booting partition
that has to be a Primary.

You should review the current Win7 disk setup, to
determine what kind of partition work needs to be
done before the install.

f) OK, having highlighted the blank partition, and hit
Next, now there will be a ton of other stuff to do.
But the rest of it will be easy. Just remember to
set up an Offline account first. If you want to
add an MSA some day (a "Microsoft Account"), you can
do that later.

Anyway, you've got enough to do now, just to secure
your license keys... The side-by-side, you can save
that for a day or two later.

HTH,
Paul
 




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