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Why are my IDE drives SCSI?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 12th 05, 12:48 AM
Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look at the
properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary


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  #2  
Old January 12th 05, 01:48 AM
Sleepless in Seattle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

It is NOT referring the physical interface BUT rather the commands
controlling the device.

--
Jonah
"Gary" wrote in message
...
I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look at
the properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary
slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary



  #3  
Old January 12th 05, 10:51 AM
BAR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

IDE stands for Integrated Drive Electronics. This refers to a type of hard
disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of device.

SCSI stands for Small Computer Systems Interface. This refers to a type of
hard disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of device.

AN IDE device cannot connect to a SCSI interface and vice versa.

There is no way BIOS or Windows could confuse the two device types.

A SCSI disk drive typically has a faster data transfer rate compared with an
IDE drive of the same time period. As with IDE [EIDE] both standards have
seen increases in performance since their introduction.

SCSI disks are standard in most 'intel' Servers and RISC servers and Apple
PCs!



"Sleepless in Seattle" wrote:

It is NOT referring the physical interface BUT rather the commands
controlling the device.

--
Jonah
"Gary" wrote in message
...
I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look at
the properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary
slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary




  #4  
Old January 12th 05, 01:28 PM
David Vair
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

That information is fine, but not revelant to the situation. If you hook an IDE hard drive to an
add-in controller such as a Promise card the drive will appear in the Device Manager as SCSI not
IDE, this is normal behavior (Why, I don't know but this is the way they appear). The origianl
posters motherboard may have an imbedded controller chipset that may do the same thing as I have
seen many motherboard with a promise chip on the board itself.
--
Dave Vair
CNE, CNA, MCP, A+, N+
Computer Education Services Corp. (CESC)

"BAR" wrote in message
...
IDE stands for Integrated Drive Electronics. This refers to a type of hard
disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of device.

SCSI stands for Small Computer Systems Interface. This refers to a type of
hard disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of device.

AN IDE device cannot connect to a SCSI interface and vice versa.

There is no way BIOS or Windows could confuse the two device types.

A SCSI disk drive typically has a faster data transfer rate compared with an
IDE drive of the same time period. As with IDE [EIDE] both standards have
seen increases in performance since their introduction.

SCSI disks are standard in most 'intel' Servers and RISC servers and Apple
PCs!



"Sleepless in Seattle" wrote:

It is NOT referring the physical interface BUT rather the commands
controlling the device.

--
Jonah
"Gary" wrote in message
...
I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look at
the properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary
slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary






  #5  
Old January 12th 05, 03:55 PM
Yves Leclerc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

BTW: This is off topic! SCSI is much better than IDE. SCSI can handle
multiple commands to multiple drives at the same time. IDE must stop all
reads/writes if you are trying to access the second drive on the IDE channel
(Master or Slave drives).


"Gary" wrote in message
...
I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look at
the properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary
slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary



  #6  
Old January 13th 05, 01:33 AM
Sandman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

Right on, Mr. Vair, i had this very same unusual situation in XP when I
hooked my IDE to the connector..... It took me forever to get an
explanation. Nice to know there are knowledgeable people like yourself to
very simply explain this anomaly; it was an a7v Asus board I had awhile back
as I remember it...

"David Vair" wrote in message
...
That information is fine, but not revelant to the situation. If you hook

an IDE hard drive to an
add-in controller such as a Promise card the drive will appear in the

Device Manager as SCSI not
IDE, this is normal behavior (Why, I don't know but this is the way they

appear). The origianl
posters motherboard may have an imbedded controller chipset that may do

the same thing as I have
seen many motherboard with a promise chip on the board itself.
--
Dave Vair
CNE, CNA, MCP, A+, N+
Computer Education Services Corp. (CESC)

"BAR" wrote in message
...
IDE stands for Integrated Drive Electronics. This refers to a type of

hard
disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of device.

SCSI stands for Small Computer Systems Interface. This refers to a type

of
hard disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of

device.

AN IDE device cannot connect to a SCSI interface and vice versa.

There is no way BIOS or Windows could confuse the two device types.

A SCSI disk drive typically has a faster data transfer rate compared

with an
IDE drive of the same time period. As with IDE [EIDE] both standards

have
seen increases in performance since their introduction.

SCSI disks are standard in most 'intel' Servers and RISC servers and

Apple
PCs!



"Sleepless in Seattle" wrote:

It is NOT referring the physical interface BUT rather the commands
controlling the device.

--
Jonah
"Gary" wrote in message
...
I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look

at
the properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary
slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than

SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary








  #7  
Old January 13th 05, 05:53 PM
Alex Nichol
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

Gary wrote:

I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look at the
properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave


This arises when a drive has an added extra driver file - such as the
cdfs one for CD drives, which normally show as SCSI. It is odd for a
plain hard drive though.

--
Alex Nichol MS MVP (Windows Technologies)
Bournemouth, U.K. (remove the D8 bit)
  #8  
Old January 13th 05, 05:53 PM
Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why are my IDE drives SCSI?

So, does that mean I haven't got a problem then?

"David Vair" wrote in message
...
That information is fine, but not revelant to the situation. If you hook
an IDE hard drive to an add-in controller such as a Promise card the drive
will appear in the Device Manager as SCSI not IDE, this is normal behavior
(Why, I don't know but this is the way they appear). The origianl posters
motherboard may have an imbedded controller chipset that may do the same
thing as I have seen many motherboard with a promise chip on the board
itself.
--
Dave Vair
CNE, CNA, MCP, A+, N+
Computer Education Services Corp. (CESC)

"BAR" wrote in message
...
IDE stands for Integrated Drive Electronics. This refers to a type of
hard
disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of device.

SCSI stands for Small Computer Systems Interface. This refers to a type
of
hard disk drive and thus an interface [or connector] for that type of
device.

AN IDE device cannot connect to a SCSI interface and vice versa.

There is no way BIOS or Windows could confuse the two device types.

A SCSI disk drive typically has a faster data transfer rate compared with
an
IDE drive of the same time period. As with IDE [EIDE] both standards
have
seen increases in performance since their introduction.

SCSI disks are standard in most 'intel' Servers and RISC servers and
Apple
PCs!



"Sleepless in Seattle" wrote:

It is NOT referring the physical interface BUT rather the commands
controlling the device.

--
Jonah
"Gary" wrote in message
...
I have 2 hard drives and 2 cd drives and all are IDE. But when I look
at
the properties of all 4 drives they all say SCSI.
I have the usual set up HD1 is in location 0 primary master HD2 is in
location 1 primary slave
CD1 is in location 0 secondary master CD2 is in location 1 secondary
slave.

Is this something I should worry about? I thought IDE is better than
SCSI?
Does anyone know how I can change them back to IDE?

thanks

Gary








 




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