A Windows XP help forum. PCbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PCbanter forum » Microsoft Windows 7 » Windows 7 Forum
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Toshiba W-7 went dark



 
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #346  
Old March 25th 18, 10:51 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Patrick[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On 25/03/2018 05:21, HB wrote:
"Patrick" wrote in message
news
On 23/03/2018 06:30, HB wrote:
I have that one also. Which of the 6 choices handles ISO files?

The first one ("Write image file to disc".


OK, so an image file is an ISO. When I see the word image I think of
pictues, not some kind of computer code.

BTW, Have you heard of a free Program called "Rufus"? Said program would
allow you to Write an image file (ISO, IMG etc., file) to a blank
USB-thumbdrive.


I already downloaded several ISO burners. I have no blank thumbdrives. All
are full of saved "stuff." I would rather use the large amount of DVDs and
CDs we have.


So why not Move what you have on your thumbdrive to a new folder on your
good Computers Desktop?
Ads
  #347  
Old March 25th 18, 10:53 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Monty
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 505
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On Sun, 25 Mar 2018 00:21:10 -0400, "HB" wrote:


"Patrick" wrote in message
news
On 23/03/2018 06:30, HB wrote:
I have that one also. Which of the 6 choices handles ISO files?

The first one ("Write image file to disc".


OK, so an image file is an ISO. When I see the word image I think of
pictues, not some kind of computer code.


I already downloaded several ISO burners. I have no blank thumbdrives. All
are full of saved "stuff." I would rather use the large amount of DVDs and
CDs we have.


Are these blank CDs and DVDs ?

  #348  
Old March 25th 18, 04:01 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,656
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of the OS?

As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those discs: It says something like "you will only have one
chance to make these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I don't know,
since they can only be used on that PC.)


Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at all) of
the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.


What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the computer
they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various hardware
parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change to enable
upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that impression.

Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s) requires
activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to HB's
situation, as even if he could get the system running from the old disc,
the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long gone. In the
unlikely event he could get the system running from the old disc, I'd
say the first thing to do would be make an image onto his Seagate
external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but any means including
W7's built-in one would do).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never be led astray onto the path of virtue.
  #349  
Old March 25th 18, 04:20 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,370
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of the OS?
As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those discs: It says something like "you will only have one
chance to make these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I don't
know, since they can only be used on that PC.)


Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at all)
of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.


What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the computer
they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various hardware
parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change to enable
upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that impression.

Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s) requires
activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to HB's
situation, as even if he could get the system running from the old disc,
the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long gone. In the
unlikely event he could get the system running from the old disc, I'd
say the first thing to do would be make an image onto his Seagate
external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but any means including
W7's built-in one would do).


OEM OSes auto-activate.

On Windows 7, an OEM copy of Windows 7 checks the information in the
SLIC table the BIOS passes to it.

On Win8 or Win10 OEM machines, an actual unique key is stored in the
BIOS as the ACPI MSDM table, and the OS sees this during startup or
something.

*******

Where actual work is required, is if a user grabs a Win7 Retail DVD
and installs on an OEM (Dell,Acer,HP) laptop. Then, the phone prompt
appears on thescreen, and you participate in an activation process.

I've done one of these on my laptop, using xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx
off the COA sticker. You send a 56 digit number to Microsoft over your
touch tone phone, and Microsoft reads back a 56 digit code that you type
into the laptop. Is the method annoying ? Oh, yeah.

Paul
  #350  
Old March 25th 18, 04:43 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,656
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

[HB: skip to paragraph near end starting "Back to HB", other than for
interest.]

In message , Paul
writes:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of the OS?
As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those discs: It says something like "you will only have
one chance to make these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I
don't know, since they can only be used on that PC.)

Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at all)
of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.

What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the computer
they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various hardware
parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change to enable
upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that impression.
Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s)
requires activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to
HB's situation, as even if he could get the system running from the
old disc, the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long
gone. In the unlikely event he could get the system running from the
old disc, I'd say the first thing to do would be make an image onto
his Seagate external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but any
means including W7's built-in one would do).


OEM OSes auto-activate.

On Windows 7, an OEM copy of Windows 7 checks the information in the
SLIC table the BIOS passes to it.

On Win8 or Win10 OEM machines, an actual unique key is stored in the
BIOS as the ACPI MSDM table, and the OS sees this during startup or
something.

*******

Where actual work is required, is if a user grabs a Win7 Retail DVD
and installs on an OEM (Dell,Acer,HP) laptop. Then, the phone prompt
appears on thescreen, and you participate in an activation process.

I've done one of these on my laptop, using xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx
off the COA sticker. You send a 56 digit number to Microsoft over your
touch tone phone, and Microsoft reads back a 56 digit code that you type
into the laptop. Is the method annoying ? Oh, yeah.

Paul


Not relevant to HB, but I was wondering about the discs that a new OEM
(pre-installed) machine prompts you to make the first few times you
start Windows after getting the machine home and turning it on. Are
these purely an OEM install disc (in which case they'd be one disc if a
DVD), or are they something different to everything else we've discussed
(Retail install, OEM install, "Rescue")? I'd assumed they were specific
to the machine they were made on, or at least the make and model, and
would restore it to its original condition (probably including the
junkware the manufacturer installs).

Back to HB: the above is useful to know - that if he gets hold of a
retail disc he'll still be able to install and activate it using the
code from his sticker, but will have to go through 'phone activation. If
he gets the one Patrick's post of 2018-3-25 10*:43:0 is providing, will
he be able to use that _without_ having to go through activation? (If he
does, and all goes well, will it then nag him to make disc[s]?)

If he installs from either of these (Retail or OEM-from-Patrick), I
presume the Toshiba special recovery (hold down 0 [zero] while powering)
won't work, though that's no great loss as it relies on the drive not
being dead and we're going to encourage him to image, aren't we.

(*hour may vary with timezone)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Never be led astray onto the path of virtue.
  #351  
Old March 25th 18, 04:51 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Rene Lamontagne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,503
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On 03/25/2018 10:43 AM, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
[HB: skip to paragraph near end starting "Back to HB", other than for
interest.]

In message , Paul
writes:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of the
OS?
¬*As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same¬* computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those¬* discs: It says something like "you will only have
one¬* chance to make¬* these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I
don't¬* know, since they can¬* only be used on that PC.)

Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at all)
of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.
¬*What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the
computer they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various
hardware parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change to
enable upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that
impression.
¬*Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s)
requires¬* activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to
HB's¬* situation, as even if he could get the system running from the
old disc,¬* the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long
gone. In the¬* unlikely event he could get the system running from the
old disc, I'd¬* say the first thing to do would be make an image onto
his Seagate¬* external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but any
means including¬* W7's built-in one would do).


OEM OSes auto-activate.

On Windows 7, an OEM copy of Windows 7 checks the information in the
SLIC table the BIOS passes to it.

On Win8 or Win10 OEM machines, an actual unique key is stored in the
BIOS as the ACPI MSDM table, and the OS sees this during startup or
something.

*******

Where actual work is required, is if a user grabs a Win7 Retail DVD
and installs on an OEM (Dell,Acer,HP) laptop. Then, the phone prompt
appears on thescreen, and you participate in an activation process.

I've done one of these on my laptop, using xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx
off the COA sticker. You send a 56 digit number to Microsoft over your
touch tone phone, and Microsoft reads back a 56 digit code that you type
into the laptop. Is the method annoying ? Oh, yeah.

¬* Paul


Not relevant to HB, but I was wondering about the discs that a new OEM
(pre-installed) machine prompts you to make the first few times you
start Windows after getting the machine home and turning it on. Are
these purely an OEM install disc (in which case they'd be one disc if a
DVD), or are they something different to everything else we've discussed
(Retail install, OEM install, "Rescue")? I'd assumed they were specific
to the machine they were made on, or at least the make and model, and
would restore it to its original condition (probably including the
junkware the manufacturer installs).

Back to HB: the above is useful to know - that if he gets hold of a
retail disc he'll still be able to install and activate it using the
code from his sticker, but will have to go through 'phone activation. If
he gets the one Patrick's post of 2018-3-25 10*:43:0 is providing, will
he be able to use that _without_ having to go through activation? (If he
does, and all goes well, will it then nag him to make disc[s]?)

If he installs from either of these (Retail or OEM-from-Patrick), I
presume the Toshiba special recovery (hold down 0 [zero] while powering)
won't work, though that's no great loss as it relies on the drive not
being dead and we're going to encourage him to image, aren't we.

(*hour may vary with timezone)


Solution to HB problem.

Concrete slab, 9 pound hammer,(John Henry). !!! *BAM* !!! :-)

Rene
  #352  
Old March 25th 18, 04:56 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Rene Lamontagne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,503
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On 03/25/2018 10:51 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
On 03/25/2018 10:43 AM, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
[HB: skip to paragraph near end starting "Back to HB", other than for
interest.]

In message , Paul
writes:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of
the OS?
¬*As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same¬* computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those¬* discs: It says something like "you will only have
one¬* chance to make¬* these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I
don't¬* know, since they can¬* only be used on that PC.)

Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at
all) of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.
¬*What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the
computer they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various
hardware parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change
to enable upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that
impression.
¬*Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s)
requires¬* activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to
HB's¬* situation, as even if he could get the system running from the
old disc,¬* the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long
gone. In the¬* unlikely event he could get the system running from
the old disc, I'd¬* say the first thing to do would be make an image
onto his Seagate¬* external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but
any means including¬* W7's built-in one would do).

OEM OSes auto-activate.

On Windows 7, an OEM copy of Windows 7 checks the information in the
SLIC table the BIOS passes to it.

On Win8 or Win10 OEM machines, an actual unique key is stored in the
BIOS as the ACPI MSDM table, and the OS sees this during startup or
something.

*******

Where actual work is required, is if a user grabs a Win7 Retail DVD
and installs on an OEM (Dell,Acer,HP) laptop. Then, the phone prompt
appears on thescreen, and you participate in an activation process.

I've done one of these on my laptop, using xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx
off the COA sticker. You send a 56 digit number to Microsoft over your
touch tone phone, and Microsoft reads back a 56 digit code that you type
into the laptop. Is the method annoying ? Oh, yeah.

¬* Paul


Not relevant to HB, but I was wondering about the discs that a new OEM
(pre-installed) machine prompts you to make the first few times you
start Windows after getting the machine home and turning it on. Are
these purely an OEM install disc (in which case they'd be one disc if
a DVD), or are they something different to everything else we've
discussed (Retail install, OEM install, "Rescue")? I'd assumed they
were specific to the machine they were made on, or at least the make
and model, and would restore it to its original condition (probably
including the junkware the manufacturer installs).

Back to HB: the above is useful to know - that if he gets hold of a
retail disc he'll still be able to install and activate it using the
code from his sticker, but will have to go through 'phone activation.
If he gets the one Patrick's post of 2018-3-25 10*:43:0 is providing,
will he be able to use that _without_ having to go through activation?
(If he does, and all goes well, will it then nag him to make disc[s]?)

If he installs from either of these (Retail or OEM-from-Patrick), I
presume the Toshiba special recovery (hold down 0 [zero] while
powering) won't work, though that's no great loss as it relies on the
drive not being dead and we're going to encourage him to image, aren't
we.

(*hour may vary with timezone)


Solution to HB problem.

¬*Concrete slab, 9 pound hammer,(John Henry).¬* !!! *BAM* !!!¬* :-)

Rene


Forgot very important part, Bad Drive.

Rene
  #353  
Old March 25th 18, 05:18 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,370
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
[HB: skip to paragraph near end starting "Back to HB", other than for
interest.]

In message , Paul
writes:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of the
OS?
As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those discs: It says something like "you will only have
one chance to make these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I
don't know, since they can only be used on that PC.)

Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at all)
of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.
What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the
computer they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various
hardware parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change to
enable upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that
impression.
Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s)
requires activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to
HB's situation, as even if he could get the system running from the
old disc, the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long
gone. In the unlikely event he could get the system running from the
old disc, I'd say the first thing to do would be make an image onto
his Seagate external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but any
means including W7's built-in one would do).


OEM OSes auto-activate.

On Windows 7, an OEM copy of Windows 7 checks the information in the
SLIC table the BIOS passes to it.

On Win8 or Win10 OEM machines, an actual unique key is stored in the
BIOS as the ACPI MSDM table, and the OS sees this during startup or
something.

*******

Where actual work is required, is if a user grabs a Win7 Retail DVD
and installs on an OEM (Dell,Acer,HP) laptop. Then, the phone prompt
appears on thescreen, and you participate in an activation process.

I've done one of these on my laptop, using xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx
off the COA sticker. You send a 56 digit number to Microsoft over your
touch tone phone, and Microsoft reads back a 56 digit code that you type
into the laptop. Is the method annoying ? Oh, yeah.

Paul


Not relevant to HB, but I was wondering about the discs that a new OEM
(pre-installed) machine prompts you to make the first few times you
start Windows after getting the machine home and turning it on. Are
these purely an OEM install disc (in which case they'd be one disc if a
DVD), or are they something different to everything else we've discussed
(Retail install, OEM install, "Rescue")? I'd assumed they were specific
to the machine they were made on, or at least the make and model, and
would restore it to its original condition (probably including the
junkware the manufacturer installs).


At the very least, the recovery partition on the hard drive, puts
back the factory setup. In addition, when you are prompted by the laptop
to make a set of DVDs based on the recovery partition, those DVDs
also return the laptop to factory state. The whole process should be
automated. The factory state includes copies of Zynga Games and
NTI Backup, stuff Microsoft didn't put there. The factory state means
all the OEM "added cruft" will be on C: , just like from the factory.


Back to HB: the above is useful to know - that if he gets hold of a
retail disc he'll still be able to install and activate it using the
code from his sticker, but will have to go through 'phone activation. If
he gets the one Patrick's post of 2018-3-25 10*:43:0 is providing, will
he be able to use that _without_ having to go through activation? (If he
does, and all goes well, will it then nag him to make disc[s]?)

If he installs from either of these (Retail or OEM-from-Patrick), I
presume the Toshiba special recovery (hold down 0 [zero] while powering)
won't work, though that's no great loss as it relies on the drive not
being dead and we're going to encourage him to image, aren't we.

(*hour may vary with timezone)


There is no sign the hard drive is healthy enough to do
a Factory Restore.

Here is a potential list of the assets a new laptop owner receives.

Acer prompt - DVD \ Three DVD set that returns laptop with a brand
DVD \___ new empty hard drive, to factory state. Activated,
DVD / and all drivers are installed already.

CD --- 500MB CD containing drivers. These drivers are
installed *after* a user does an emergency Retail
DVD installation. This saves time when doing a
Retail install. You combine this CD, with your
Microsoft Win7 download DVD, if wanting to install the
Retail version in an emergency.

Microsoft prompt - CD --- 300MB CD for emergency boot purposes. Can be used
to restore a Windows 7 Backup, to a brand new hard
drive. This boot disc can also be used to get to
a Command Prompt and do CHKDSK on a partition
needing to be checked.

That's a total of five optical discs, that a brand new laptop
will prompt a new laptop owner to burn, within the first two
days of ownership. The laptop should continue to prompt you,
to make the materials.

Failure to burn the discs means, if the hard drive dies, the
user has nothing.

The "Acer Prompt" in the above, makes *one* copy of the media set
for you. If you want assurance of having the info later, save
copies of the burned DVDs as a set of ISO files for later. By having
multiple copies of the information, when an emergency situation
does come up, you'll have the goods.

Paul
  #354  
Old March 25th 18, 05:52 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Rene Lamontagne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,503
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On 03/25/2018 10:56 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
On 03/25/2018 10:51 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
On 03/25/2018 10:43 AM, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
[HB: skip to paragraph near end starting "Back to HB", other than for
interest.]

In message , Paul
writes:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of
the OS?
¬*As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on
the _same¬* computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says
about _making_ those¬* discs: It says something like "you will
only have one¬* chance to make¬* these discs". (_Why_ it does that
limit, I don't¬* know, since they can¬* only be used on that PC.)

Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at
all) of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.
¬*What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number
of times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always
my _understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the
computer they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various
hardware parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change
to enable upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for
that impression.
¬*Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s)
requires¬* activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant
to HB's¬* situation, as even if he could get the system running from
the old disc,¬* the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably
long gone. In the¬* unlikely event he could get the system running
from the old disc, I'd¬* say the first thing to do would be make an
image onto his Seagate¬* external drive (which I would do with
Macrium, but any means including¬* W7's built-in one would do).

OEM OSes auto-activate.

On Windows 7, an OEM copy of Windows 7 checks the information in the
SLIC table the BIOS passes to it.

On Win8 or Win10 OEM machines, an actual unique key is stored in the
BIOS as the ACPI MSDM table, and the OS sees this during startup or
something.

*******

Where actual work is required, is if a user grabs a Win7 Retail DVD
and installs on an OEM (Dell,Acer,HP) laptop. Then, the phone prompt
appears on thescreen, and you participate in an activation process.

I've done one of these on my laptop, using
xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx-xxxxx
off the COA sticker. You send a 56 digit number to Microsoft over your
touch tone phone, and Microsoft reads back a 56 digit code that you
type
into the laptop. Is the method annoying ? Oh, yeah.

¬* Paul

Not relevant to HB, but I was wondering about the discs that a new
OEM (pre-installed) machine prompts you to make the first few times
you start Windows after getting the machine home and turning it on.
Are these purely an OEM install disc (in which case they'd be one
disc if a DVD), or are they something different to everything else
we've discussed (Retail install, OEM install, "Rescue")? I'd assumed
they were specific to the machine they were made on, or at least the
make and model, and would restore it to its original condition
(probably including the junkware the manufacturer installs).

Back to HB: the above is useful to know - that if he gets hold of a
retail disc he'll still be able to install and activate it using the
code from his sticker, but will have to go through 'phone activation.
If he gets the one Patrick's post of 2018-3-25 10*:43:0 is providing,
will he be able to use that _without_ having to go through
activation? (If he does, and all goes well, will it then nag him to
make disc[s]?)

If he installs from either of these (Retail or OEM-from-Patrick), I
presume the Toshiba special recovery (hold down 0 [zero] while
powering) won't work, though that's no great loss as it relies on the
drive not being dead and we're going to encourage him to image,
aren't we.

(*hour may vary with timezone)


Solution to HB problem.

¬*¬*Concrete slab, 9 pound hammer,(John Henry).¬* !!! *BAM* !!!¬* :-)

Rene


Forgot very important part, Bad Drive.

Rene


Or was it a 20 pound hammer? :-)

Rene

  #355  
Old March 25th 18, 06:15 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Patrick[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On 25/03/2018 16:01, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 06:18, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , HB writes:
[]
How many times does MS allow us to use the "once only" copy of the OS?
¬*As many times as you like/need - as long as they're always on the
_same¬* computer_. The "once only" is what Microsoft says about
_making_ those¬* discs: It says something like "you will only have one
chance to make¬* these discs". (_Why_ it does that limit, I don't
know, since they can¬* only be used on that PC.)


Oops, I,ve just told HB that said would be a restriction (if at all)
of the OEM rather than MS. Still not to relevant at the moment.


What I've said above is just _my_ understanding of the situation -
though I'm fairly sure the "once only" _does_ apply to the number of
times a new computer offers to _make_ the discs. It was always my
_understanding_ that those discs were in some way tied to the computer
they were made on (presumably involving a hash of various hardware
parameters, and allowing for a _certain amount_ of change to enable
upgrade and/or repair), but I can't cite a source for that impression.

Does anyone know whether a system restored from such disc(s) requires
activation? Just curious; it's not going to be relevant to HB's
situation, as even if he could get the system running from the old disc,
the opportunity to make a rescue disc is probably long gone. In the
unlikely event he could get the system running from the old disc, I'd
say the first thing to do would be make an image onto his Seagate
external drive (which I would do with Macrium, but any means including
W7's built-in one would do).


Sorry but I have had a platefull, I am going to delete the W7
installation *.iso from my Dropbox, you have been given the links to
where it comes from, so yourself, 'Paul' or the destroyer 'Rene
Lamotagne' et-al can explain to 'HB' how to handle/Download Torrents.etc.
  #356  
Old March 25th 18, 06:16 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,656
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

In message , Rene Lamontagne
writes:
On 03/25/2018 10:51 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:

[]
Solution to HB problem.
*Concrete slab, 9 pound hammer,(John Henry).* !!! *BAM* !!!* :-)
Rene


I was going to say, HB's not been that bad - a bit slow to get what we
wanted him to do at times, but still ... (-:


Forgot very important part, Bad Drive.


.... but you got there before me!

Rene


Still doesn't get his machine back working though. But we're working on
that.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"... all your hard work in the hands of twelve people too stupid to get off
jury
duty." CSI, 200x
  #357  
Old March 25th 18, 06:51 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,656
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

*HB* - read the paragraphs thus marked.

In message , Paul
writes:
[]
At the very least, the recovery partition on the hard drive, puts
back the factory setup.


But, presumably, just by moving files around in the C: partition - the
recovery partition isn't big enough (by more than an order of magnitude0
to actually include a copy of Windows.

In addition, when you are prompted by the laptop
to make a set of DVDs based on the recovery partition, those DVDs
also return the laptop to factory state. The whole process should be
automated. The factory state includes copies of Zynga Games and
NTI Backup, stuff Microsoft didn't put there. The factory state means
all the OEM "added cruft" will be on C: , just like from the factory.


Presumably those DVDs _do_ include a copy of Windows, as well as all the
drivers that are specific to the hardware (and the Manufacturer-chosen
crudware), i. e. could be used with a new drive. Presumably also not
requiring activation.


Back to HB: the above is useful to know - that if he gets hold of a
retail disc he'll still be able to install and activate it using the
code from his sticker, but will have to go through 'phone activation.
If he gets the one Patrick's post of 2018-3-25 10*:43:0 is providing,
will he be able to use that _without_ having to go through
activation? (If he does, and all goes well, will it then nag him to
make disc[s]?)
If he installs from either of these (Retail or OEM-from-Patrick), I
presume the Toshiba special recovery (hold down 0 [zero] while
powering) won't work, though that's no great loss as it relies on the
drive not being dead and we're going to encourage him to image, aren't we.
(*hour may vary with timezone)


There is no sign the hard drive is healthy enough to do
a Factory Restore.


No. It _might_ be possible to image it using ddrescue, but (a) that's
probably flaky anyway and (b) HB [and I, for that matter] knows
insufficient about using ddrescue that instructing him how to do that
would probably be more effort than instructing him to just use the OEM
file that Patrick has provided for him, and getting the necessary
drivers afterwards.

*HB* - in fact, that's something he could be doing (on his working PC)
while waiting for his "cable" and new HD: download all the drivers from
the Toshiba site that relate to the hardware in the laptop: these would
include, at least, audio circuitry, video circuitry, probably wifi
adapter, and then maybe touchpad, keyboard, card reader if it has one
(many laptops do but their owners haven't found it!), fingerprint
scanner if it has one ... when I did a similar fetch-dump for this
machine, I got (in no particular order): user manual, bluetooth, bubo
assistant*, bulletin board*, chip set, config*, face recognition*,
HDD_SDD alert, Intel Management Engine Interface*, Network Device ID
Registry Setting Tool*, Online Product Information*, PlayReady PC
Runtime*, Rapid Storage Technology Driver*, ReelTime*, security assist*,
sleep*, Trusted Platform Module*, 3grf [graphics], assist*, bios*, eco*,
hddprot, regpatch*, USB. I don't know what a lot of those are - I
haven't installed the ones I've marked with *; I just thought it'd be
wise to download them while they're available, as I don't know how long
Toshiba will keep them such.

*HB* I'd get at least the (user manual and) the ones for audio, video
(graphics), wifi, bluetooth, touchpad if offered, card reader, and
possibly chip set and USB. If there's any choice, obviously make sure
you get the ones relevant to Windows 7, and that match your bitness (32
or 64). Also I'd amend the downloaded filenames (they're all .zip files
for mine) so you know what they're for, as they're not obvious: for
example, I now have
"[bluetooth] blt-mon-20100906153325.zip" and
"[fingerprint] fp-sw-20130515154751.zip" (and I've renamed to
"[!] userman-en-20100720091205.zip" so it comes at the top in Explorer).

*HB* If there _isn't_ a touchpad driver, I'd get the one from Synaptics
- they seem to make everybody's touchpads anyway, or at least their
driver (despite their warnings) has worked everywhere I've used it so
far.

Here is a potential list of the assets a new laptop owner receives.

Acer prompt - DVD \ Three DVD set that returns laptop with a brand
DVD \___ new empty hard drive, to factory state.
Activated,
DVD / and all drivers are installed already.

CD --- 500MB CD containing drivers. These drivers are
installed *after* a user does an
emergency Retail
DVD installation. This saves time when doing a
Retail install. You combine this CD, with your
Microsoft Win7 download DVD, if wanting
to install the
Retail version in an emergency.


_Could_ that (drivers) be extracted from the poorly drive, do you think?
(Though I'd get the drivers from the Toshiba website anyway.)


Microsoft prompt - CD --- 300MB CD for emergency boot purposes. Can be used
to restore a Windows 7 Backup, to a brand
new hard
drive. This boot disc can also be used to get to
a Command Prompt and do CHKDSK on a partition
needing to be checked.

So that one can be used EITHER to restore a backup (made to an external
source, usually a USB HD), OR to _attempt_ repairs on a poorly disc. OK?

That's a total of five optical discs, that a brand new laptop
will prompt a new laptop owner to burn, within the first two
days of ownership. The laptop should continue to prompt you,
to make the materials.


(Though I think it's only too easy to turn off the nag permanently, when
you only meant to do so temporarily.)

Failure to burn the discs means, if the hard drive dies, the
user has nothing.


Indeed.

The "Acer Prompt" in the above, makes *one* copy of the media set
for you.

Though I've often wondered _why_ they limit it in that way. (Maybe
Microsoft oblige them to.)
If you want assurance of having the info later, save
copies of the burned DVDs as a set of ISO files for later. By having


But _not_ on the HD inside the computer they were made on! But somewhere
else - external HD, or the HD of another computer, say.

multiple copies of the information, when an emergency situation
does come up, you'll have the goods.

Paul

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"... all your hard work in the hands of twelve people too stupid to get off
jury
duty." CSI, 200x
  #358  
Old March 25th 18, 09:44 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Patrick[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

On 25/03/2018 18:15, Patrick wrote:
Sorry but I have had a platefull, I am going to delete the W7
installation *.iso from my Dropbox, you have been given the links to
where it comes from, so yourself, 'Paul'¬* or the destroyer 'Rene
Lamotagne' et-al can explain to 'HB' how to handle/Download Torrents.etc.


Please everyone accept my apologies for above outburst.
  #359  
Old March 25th 18, 11:02 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,656
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

In message , Patrick
writes:
On 25/03/2018 18:15, Patrick wrote:
Sorry but I have had a platefull, I am going to delete the W7
installation *.iso from my Dropbox, you have been given the links to
where it comes from, so yourself, 'Paul'* or the destroyer 'Rene
Lamotagne' et-al can explain to 'HB' how to handle/Download Torrents.etc.


Please everyone accept my apologies for above outburst.


Certainly accepted. We've all been very patient in this thread (-:!
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you carry on hating, you're the one who's damaged.
- Sir Harold Atcherley, sent to the Burma/Siam railway in April 1943
  #360  
Old April 4th 18, 10:29 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,656
Default Toshiba W-7 went dark

This thread has gone quiet. HB, have you got the new drive yet, and has
the "cable" turned up after its slow boat from China trip?

In message , Paul
writes:
[]
Here is a potential list of the assets a new laptop owner receives.

Acer prompt - DVD \ Three DVD set that returns laptop with a brand
DVD \___ new empty hard drive, to factory state.
Activated,
DVD / and all drivers are installed already.

CD --- 500MB CD containing drivers. These drivers are
installed *after* a user does an
emergency Retail
DVD installation. This saves time when doing a
Retail install. You combine this CD, with your
Microsoft Win7 download DVD, if wanting
to install the
Retail version in an emergency.

Microsoft prompt - CD --- 300MB CD for emergency boot purposes. Can be used
to restore a Windows 7 Backup, to a brand
new hard
drive. This boot disc can also be used to get to
a Command Prompt and do CHKDSK on a partition
needing to be checked.

That's a total of five optical discs, that a brand new laptop
will prompt a new laptop owner to burn, within the first two
days of ownership. The laptop should continue to prompt you,
to make the materials.

Failure to burn the discs means, if the hard drive dies, the
user has nothing.

The "Acer Prompt" in the above, makes *one* copy of the media set
for you. If you want assurance of having the info later, save
copies of the burned DVDs as a set of ISO files for later. By having
multiple copies of the information, when an emergency situation
does come up, you'll have the goods.

Paul

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

it is easy to make up a lie, but it can take much more time and effort to
convincingly refute it. - Patrick Cockburn, i, 2016-9-24
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2018 PCbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.