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How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 3rd 11, 10:27 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Doc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?

Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?
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  #2  
Old February 3rd 11, 11:23 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
SC Tom[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,089
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?


"Doc" wrote in message
...
Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


You'd not only be wasting your time by uninstalling all the apps, but would
also run into a number of problems by doing that and then attempting a
System Restore. Why not just go ahead and reinstall it, if a scratch system
is what you're looking for? If you have a retail disk for XP Pro and a valid
key, you can always slipstream SP3 into it to avoid a lot of the updates.
How to Slipstream Windows XP Service Pack 3
http://www.howtohaven.com/system/sli...e-pack-3.shtml

Is there a particular reason or problem that you're having with XP that
makes you want to do this? If you post the problem(s) you're having, help
can probably be had from here.
--
SC Tom
-There's no such thing as TMI when asking for tech support.

  #3  
Old February 3rd 11, 11:32 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Doc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?

On Feb 3, 6:23*pm, "SC Tom" wrote:
"Doc" wrote in message

...

Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


You'd not only be wasting your time by uninstalling all the apps, but would
also run into a number of problems by doing that and then attempting a
System Restore. Why not just go ahead and reinstall it, if a scratch system
is what you're looking for?



Because I've done it twice already in recent history and besides the
system reinstall being a colossal butt pain, I also have to go through
a song and dance with some other apps that require you to regenerate
new activation keys when it's a different install than the one under
which they were first installed.


Is there a particular reason or problem that you're having with XP that
makes you want to do this? If you post the problem(s) you're having, help
can probably be had from here.



Using Pinnacle Studio 9.4.3 (video editing app) I'm getting a
"application has requested runtime to terminate in an unusual way"
glitch during DVD rendering that I've never had before with this app.
I know it CAN run fine under XP Pro since it was running fine before.
I'm guessing something that's been installed is conflicting with it.
So want to strip everything away and see if the problem is resolved
and then pay attention to see what causes the problem again if it re-
occurs.

  #4  
Old February 4th 11, 12:36 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
choro
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 944
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?

On 03/02/2011 23:23, SC Tom wrote:

"Doc" wrote in message
...
Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


You'd not only be wasting your time by uninstalling all the apps, but
would also run into a number of problems by doing that and then
attempting a System Restore. Why not just go ahead and reinstall it, if
a scratch system is what you're looking for? If you have a retail disk
for XP Pro and a valid key, you can always slipstream SP3 into it to
avoid a lot of the updates.
How to Slipstream Windows XP Service Pack 3
http://www.howtohaven.com/system/sli...e-pack-3.shtml


I seem to remember slipstreaming SP3 into an OEM version of Win XP and
it worked beautifully as far as I remember.

Had no problems with MS either re-registering and re-activating it as I
had both registered AND activated my WinXP OEM version with them for
the previous installation on the same computer.

Or did I install Win XP first and then inserted my SP3 CD I had created
from a download of SP3? One's memory can play tricks on one sometimes.
Probably the latter as I have just been looking through my installation
CDs and can't seem to find Win XP Pro OEM with SP3 slipstreamed.

Oh well!
--
choro
*****


Is there a particular reason or problem that you're having with XP that
makes you want to do this? If you post the problem(s) you're having,
help can probably be had from here.

  #5  
Old February 4th 11, 01:08 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
(PeteCresswell)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,933
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?

Per Doc:
Because I've done it twice already in recent history and besides the
system reinstall being a colossal butt pain, I also have to go through
a song and dance with some other apps that require you to regenerate
new activation keys when it's a different install than the one under
which they were first installed.


For future use, look into any one of the many disc imaging
utilities out there.

You build a system in steps, taking images along the way. Then
you can revert to any one in about 30 minutes.

The one that has served me well over the years is the DOS version
of TeraByte's "Image". Less than twenty bucks when I bought it
'way back when...
--
PeteCresswell
  #6  
Old February 4th 11, 01:56 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
SC Tom[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,089
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?


"choro" wrote in message
...
On 03/02/2011 23:23, SC Tom wrote:

"Doc" wrote in message
...
Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


You'd not only be wasting your time by uninstalling all the apps, but
would also run into a number of problems by doing that and then
attempting a System Restore. Why not just go ahead and reinstall it, if
a scratch system is what you're looking for? If you have a retail disk
for XP Pro and a valid key, you can always slipstream SP3 into it to
avoid a lot of the updates.
How to Slipstream Windows XP Service Pack 3
http://www.howtohaven.com/system/sli...e-pack-3.shtml


I seem to remember slipstreaming SP3 into an OEM version of Win XP and it
worked beautifully as far as I remember.

Had no problems with MS either re-registering and re-activating it as I
had both registered AND activated my WinXP OEM version with them for the
previous installation on the same computer.

Or did I install Win XP first and then inserted my SP3 CD I had created
from a download of SP3? One's memory can play tricks on one sometimes.
Probably the latter as I have just been looking through my installation
CDs and can't seem to find Win XP Pro OEM with SP3 slipstreamed.

Oh well!
--
choro
*****


I've seen problems using an OEM version if even the slighest thing has
changed from when the system was new. The slipstreaming worked fine; it was
using the slipstreamed version for an installation that was the problem. The
installation kept looking for updated drivers, or something similar. It's
been a while since I tried it, so I don't remember the exact details. That's
why I suggested the retail version. I've had no problems doing it that way.
--
SC Tom
-There's no such thing as TMI when asking for tech support.



Is there a particular reason or problem that you're having with XP that
makes you want to do this? If you post the problem(s) you're having,
help can probably be had from here.


  #7  
Old February 4th 11, 02:09 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Mint
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 298
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?

On Feb 3, 4:27*pm, Doc wrote:
Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


I recommend Macrium Reflect.

Since using it, I have NEVER had to re-install my O.S.

I store my images on a separate hard drive in case my primary drive
fails.

I have used it many times and never a failure.

Andy
  #8  
Old February 4th 11, 10:30 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.windowsxp.setup_deployment,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Doc
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?

As a follow up, as of this time it looks like rolling the computer
back did get around whatever the issue was. Was able to complete and
burn the same DVD project that repeatedly crashed before.

Thanks for the input, I'll look into those system backup apps.
  #9  
Old February 7th 11, 02:45 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Tim Meddick[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,020
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?

What does not seem to have been mentioned [in this thread] as yet, is the
fact that many of the more modern PCs, instead of issuing a CD-ROM, XP
[oem] installation disk (or sometimes, as well as already include a
complete "disk-image" of the hard-drive as it left the factory.

This disk-image, on restoring it, will take the computer back to a state
exactly how Windows XP was on the day it left the factory. this also means
ANY and ALL programs you have installed will not be present on the drive.

You will know if your PC has such a pre-installed disk-image "restore"
utility, if when you are initially starting up your PC, and before you are
seeing the "Loading Windows XP..." splash-screen, you would see a screen,
quite possibly with the manufacturer's logo on it, but also somewhere on
the screen, the message Press F1 to begin emagency RESTORE options or
something quite similar (maybe ordering a different key other than F1 to be
pressed instead).

On pressing the key to which the message alludes, you will be given options
to be able to restore he PC to it's original state.

The process is built-in but is essentially the same as what 3rd-party
disk-imaging "backup & restore" software does. However, it's interface
will be quite different and it will have no other function other than to
restore it's single disk-image.

This single disk-image will be a hidden file on a seperate partition,
sometimes hidden but, sometimes this extra partiton will be seen but look
apparently "empty".

So, if re-installing XP is something you are reluctant to do, the "horror"
of finding that you cannot locate all the right drivers or that Window's
installations sometimes just "fail" for no apparent reason. Choosing the
built-in partition "RESTORE" option from the PC's start screen (if your PC
turns out to have it) will by-pass the normal XP's
installation-from-scratch proccess and restore the PC to a sate as and when
it left the factory.

With 3rd-party disk-imaging software, you will have far more control and
"configure-ability" over it, but it's simply a case of the "barn door after
the horse has bolted" sort-of-thing. But it is something to consider for
the future. After getting your PC back to the way you want it, install
3rd-party disk-imaging software and immidiately create a "snapshot" of the
main [system] partition [usually C:] for a day when the PC experiences any
more un-resolveable problems.

On buying a new PC, this is what I would advise doing straight away, to
augment the functionality that is seriously lacking with XPs built-in
"System Restore" utility.

Where it is my opinion that "System Restore" is of some value, I also most
sinsearely belive one sould never rely on it to any great extent - ergo -
some other configuration backup is, likewise, seriously needed.

This alternative can be provided by a combination of some type of registry
backup / restore facillity and 3rd-party disk-imaging / restore software.

An example of the first is ERUNT (free - google "ERUNT download") and an
example of the second is "Paragon Backup and Recovery" (google the same).

==

Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :-)




"Doc" wrote in message
...
Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


  #10  
Old February 8th 11, 12:40 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Mint
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 298
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newlyinstalled state without reinstalling?

On Feb 7, 8:45*am, "Tim Meddick" wrote:
What does not seem to have been mentioned [in this thread] as yet, is the
fact that many of the more modern PCs, instead of issuing a CD-ROM, XP
[oem] installation disk (or sometimes, as well as already include a
complete "disk-image" of the hard-drive as it left the factory.

This disk-image, on restoring it, will take the computer back to a state
exactly how Windows XP was on the day it left the factory. this also means
ANY and ALL programs you have installed will not be present on the drive.

You will know if your PC has such a pre-installed disk-image "restore"
utility, if when you are initially starting up your PC, and before you are
seeing the "Loading Windows XP..." splash-screen, you would see a screen,
quite possibly with the manufacturer's logo on it, but also somewhere on
the screen, the message Press F1 to begin emagency RESTORE options or
something quite similar (maybe ordering a different key other than F1 to be
pressed instead).

On pressing the key to which the message alludes, you will be given options
to be able to restore he PC to it's original state.

The process is built-in but is essentially the same as what 3rd-party
disk-imaging "backup & restore" software does. *However, it's interface
will be quite different and it will have no other function other than to
restore it's single disk-image.

This single disk-image will be a hidden file on a seperate partition,
sometimes hidden but, sometimes this extra partiton will be seen but look
apparently "empty".

So, if re-installing XP is something you are reluctant to do, the "horror"
of finding that you cannot locate all the right drivers or that Window's
installations sometimes just "fail" for no apparent reason. *Choosing the
built-in partition "RESTORE" option from the PC's start screen (if your PC
turns out to have it) will by-pass the normal XP's
installation-from-scratch proccess and restore the PC to a sate as and when
it left the factory.

With 3rd-party disk-imaging software, you will have far more control and
"configure-ability" over it, but it's simply a case of the "barn door after
the horse has bolted" sort-of-thing. *But it is something to consider for
the future. *After getting your PC back to the way you want it, install
3rd-party disk-imaging software and immidiately create a "snapshot" of the
main [system] partition [usually C:] for a day when the PC experiences any
more un-resolveable problems.

On buying a new PC, this is what I would advise doing straight away, to
augment the functionality that is seriously lacking with XPs built-in
"System Restore" utility.

Where it is my opinion that "System Restore" is of some value, I also most
sinsearely belive one sould never rely on it to any great extent - ergo -
some other configuration backup is, likewise, *seriously needed.

This alternative can be provided by a combination of some type of registry
backup / restore facillity and 3rd-party disk-imaging / restore software.

An example of the first is ERUNT (free - google "ERUNT download") and an
example of the second is "Paragon Backup and Recovery" (google the same).

==

Cheers, * *Tim Meddick, * *Peckham, London. * *:-)

"Doc" wrote in message

...







Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain anything
by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system restore? Or
will I be wasting my time?


I used to use ERUNT.

ERUNT only backs up the registry.

If anything else gets corrupted, you are back to re-install the O.S.
or a disk image.

I use a batch file to copy backups of zipped programs, documents,
settings to a second drive
which I would use if my primary drive "bit the dust". :-)

Andy





  #11  
Old February 8th 11, 02:08 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
SC Tom[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,089
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?

Mint wrote:
On Feb 7, 8:45 am, "Tim Meddick" wrote:
What does not seem to have been mentioned [in this thread] as yet,
is the fact that many of the more modern PCs, instead of issuing a
CD-ROM, XP [oem] installation disk (or sometimes, as well as
already include a complete "disk-image" of the hard-drive as it left
the factory.

This disk-image, on restoring it, will take the computer back to a
state exactly how Windows XP was on the day it left the factory.
this also means ANY and ALL programs you have installed will not be
present on the drive.

You will know if your PC has such a pre-installed disk-image
"restore" utility, if when you are initially starting up your PC,
and before you are seeing the "Loading Windows XP..." splash-screen,
you would see a screen, quite possibly with the manufacturer's logo
on it, but also somewhere on the screen, the message Press F1 to
begin emagency RESTORE options or something quite similar (maybe
ordering a different key other than F1 to be pressed instead).

On pressing the key to which the message alludes, you will be given
options to be able to restore he PC to it's original state.

The process is built-in but is essentially the same as what 3rd-party
disk-imaging "backup & restore" software does. However, it's
interface will be quite different and it will have no other function
other than to restore it's single disk-image.

This single disk-image will be a hidden file on a seperate partition,
sometimes hidden but, sometimes this extra partiton will be seen but
look apparently "empty".

So, if re-installing XP is something you are reluctant to do, the
"horror" of finding that you cannot locate all the right drivers or
that Window's installations sometimes just "fail" for no apparent
reason. Choosing the built-in partition "RESTORE" option from the
PC's start screen (if your PC turns out to have it) will by-pass the
normal XP's installation-from-scratch proccess and restore the PC to
a sate as and when it left the factory.

With 3rd-party disk-imaging software, you will have far more control
and "configure-ability" over it, but it's simply a case of the "barn
door after the horse has bolted" sort-of-thing. But it is something
to consider for the future. After getting your PC back to the way
you want it, install 3rd-party disk-imaging software and immidiately
create a "snapshot" of the main [system] partition [usually C:] for
a day when the PC experiences any more un-resolveable problems.

On buying a new PC, this is what I would advise doing straight away,
to augment the functionality that is seriously lacking with XPs
built-in "System Restore" utility.

Where it is my opinion that "System Restore" is of some value, I
also most sinsearely belive one sould never rely on it to any great
extent - ergo - some other configuration backup is, likewise,
seriously needed.

This alternative can be provided by a combination of some type of
registry backup / restore facillity and 3rd-party disk-imaging /
restore software.

An example of the first is ERUNT (free - google "ERUNT download")
and an example of the second is "Paragon Backup and Recovery"
(google the same).

==

Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :-)

"Doc" wrote in message

...







Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain
anything by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system
restore? Or will I be wasting my time?


I used to use ERUNT.

ERUNT only backs up the registry.

If anything else gets corrupted, you are back to re-install the O.S.
or a disk image.

I use a batch file to copy backups of zipped programs, documents,
settings to a second drive
which I would use if my primary drive "bit the dust". :-)

Andy


The drawback to using a second internal drive (if that's what it is) or an
external always connected is that in case of a power surge/lightning strike
or other catastrophic event, you're liable to lose it all. That's why I
prefer doing images and incrementals on a regular basis to an external drive
that's connected only as I need it.

I still use ERUNT on both my XP and Win7 machines. KOW, I haven't had a need
for it, but it takes up little room and runs on its own.
--
SC Tom
-There's no such thing as TMI when asking for tech support.

  #12  
Old February 8th 11, 05:28 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Tim Meddick[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,020
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?

Back-ups, ideally, should be made to an external hard-drive, however,
nothing with a capital N is perfect in this world, and nothing can prevent
the unlikeliest of co-incidental simultaneous hd & external hd failures
occurring at the same time either!

It's a case of do what you can with what you've got.

The main point being that one should definitely attempt to make backups (on
a regular basis).

To that end of including some sort of built-in restoration facility, I was
referring to in my earlier post, PC manufacturers nowadays prefer to
include a second *partition* (not a second internal hd - which would be
better; and not an external one - which would be better still!) that
contains a disk-image of the Operating System as it was the day it left the
factory...

==

Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :-)




"SC Tom" wrote in message
...
Mint wrote:
On Feb 7, 8:45 am, "Tim Meddick" wrote:
What does not seem to have been mentioned [in this thread] as yet,
is the fact that many of the more modern PCs, instead of issuing a
CD-ROM, XP [oem] installation disk (or sometimes, as well as
already include a complete "disk-image" of the hard-drive as it left
the factory.

This disk-image, on restoring it, will take the computer back to a
state exactly how Windows XP was on the day it left the factory.
this also means ANY and ALL programs you have installed will not be
present on the drive.

You will know if your PC has such a pre-installed disk-image
"restore" utility, if when you are initially starting up your PC,
and before you are seeing the "Loading Windows XP..." splash-screen,
you would see a screen, quite possibly with the manufacturer's logo
on it, but also somewhere on the screen, the message Press F1 to
begin emagency RESTORE options or something quite similar (maybe
ordering a different key other than F1 to be pressed instead).

On pressing the key to which the message alludes, you will be given
options to be able to restore he PC to it's original state.

The process is built-in but is essentially the same as what 3rd-party
disk-imaging "backup & restore" software does. However, it's
interface will be quite different and it will have no other function
other than to restore it's single disk-image.

This single disk-image will be a hidden file on a seperate partition,
sometimes hidden but, sometimes this extra partiton will be seen but
look apparently "empty".

So, if re-installing XP is something you are reluctant to do, the
"horror" of finding that you cannot locate all the right drivers or
that Window's installations sometimes just "fail" for no apparent
reason. Choosing the built-in partition "RESTORE" option from the
PC's start screen (if your PC turns out to have it) will by-pass the
normal XP's installation-from-scratch proccess and restore the PC to
a sate as and when it left the factory.

With 3rd-party disk-imaging software, you will have far more control
and "configure-ability" over it, but it's simply a case of the "barn
door after the horse has bolted" sort-of-thing. But it is something
to consider for the future. After getting your PC back to the way
you want it, install 3rd-party disk-imaging software and immidiately
create a "snapshot" of the main [system] partition [usually C:] for
a day when the PC experiences any more un-resolveable problems.

On buying a new PC, this is what I would advise doing straight away,
to augment the functionality that is seriously lacking with XPs
built-in "System Restore" utility.

Where it is my opinion that "System Restore" is of some value, I
also most sinsearely belive one sould never rely on it to any great
extent - ergo - some other configuration backup is, likewise,
seriously needed.

This alternative can be provided by a combination of some type of
registry backup / restore facillity and 3rd-party disk-imaging /
restore software.

An example of the first is ERUNT (free - google "ERUNT download")
and an example of the second is "Paragon Backup and Recovery"
(google the same).

==

Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :-)

"Doc" wrote in message

...







Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain
anything by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system
restore? Or will I be wasting my time?


I used to use ERUNT.

ERUNT only backs up the registry.

If anything else gets corrupted, you are back to re-install the O.S.
or a disk image.

I use a batch file to copy backups of zipped programs, documents,
settings to a second drive
which I would use if my primary drive "bit the dust". :-)

Andy


The drawback to using a second internal drive (if that's what it is) or
an external always connected is that in case of a power surge/lightning
strike or other catastrophic event, you're liable to lose it all. That's
why I prefer doing images and incrementals on a regular basis to an
external drive that's connected only as I need it.

I still use ERUNT on both my XP and Win7 machines. KOW, I haven't had a
need for it, but it takes up little room and runs on its own.
--
SC Tom
-There's no such thing as TMI when asking for tech support.


  #13  
Old February 8th 11, 12:24 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
SC Tom[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,089
Default How effective is System Restore to bring XP Pro back to a newly installed state without reinstalling?

This is all very true, and I couldn't agree more. I was replying to Andy's
reply about using a second drive for his backups. But you are correct- if
the powers-that-be has a finger over the 'smite' button, you're hosed no
matter what method you use :-)
--
SC Tom
-There's no such thing as TMI when asking for tech support.


"Tim Meddick" wrote in message
...
Back-ups, ideally, should be made to an external hard-drive, however,
nothing with a capital N is perfect in this world, and nothing can prevent
the unlikeliest of co-incidental simultaneous hd & external hd failures
occurring at the same time either!

It's a case of do what you can with what you've got.

The main point being that one should definitely attempt to make backups
(on a regular basis).

To that end of including some sort of built-in restoration facility, I was
referring to in my earlier post, PC manufacturers nowadays prefer to
include a second *partition* (not a second internal hd - which would be
better; and not an external one - which would be better still!) that
contains a disk-image of the Operating System as it was the day it left
the factory...

==

Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :-)




"SC Tom" wrote in message
...
Mint wrote:
On Feb 7, 8:45 am, "Tim Meddick" wrote:
What does not seem to have been mentioned [in this thread] as yet,
is the fact that many of the more modern PCs, instead of issuing a
CD-ROM, XP [oem] installation disk (or sometimes, as well as
already include a complete "disk-image" of the hard-drive as it left
the factory.

This disk-image, on restoring it, will take the computer back to a
state exactly how Windows XP was on the day it left the factory.
this also means ANY and ALL programs you have installed will not be
present on the drive.

You will know if your PC has such a pre-installed disk-image
"restore" utility, if when you are initially starting up your PC,
and before you are seeing the "Loading Windows XP..." splash-screen,
you would see a screen, quite possibly with the manufacturer's logo
on it, but also somewhere on the screen, the message Press F1 to
begin emagency RESTORE options or something quite similar (maybe
ordering a different key other than F1 to be pressed instead).

On pressing the key to which the message alludes, you will be given
options to be able to restore he PC to it's original state.

The process is built-in but is essentially the same as what 3rd-party
disk-imaging "backup & restore" software does. However, it's
interface will be quite different and it will have no other function
other than to restore it's single disk-image.

This single disk-image will be a hidden file on a seperate partition,
sometimes hidden but, sometimes this extra partiton will be seen but
look apparently "empty".

So, if re-installing XP is something you are reluctant to do, the
"horror" of finding that you cannot locate all the right drivers or
that Window's installations sometimes just "fail" for no apparent
reason. Choosing the built-in partition "RESTORE" option from the
PC's start screen (if your PC turns out to have it) will by-pass the
normal XP's installation-from-scratch proccess and restore the PC to
a sate as and when it left the factory.

With 3rd-party disk-imaging software, you will have far more control
and "configure-ability" over it, but it's simply a case of the "barn
door after the horse has bolted" sort-of-thing. But it is something
to consider for the future. After getting your PC back to the way
you want it, install 3rd-party disk-imaging software and immidiately
create a "snapshot" of the main [system] partition [usually C:] for
a day when the PC experiences any more un-resolveable problems.

On buying a new PC, this is what I would advise doing straight away,
to augment the functionality that is seriously lacking with XPs
built-in "System Restore" utility.

Where it is my opinion that "System Restore" is of some value, I
also most sinsearely belive one sould never rely on it to any great
extent - ergo - some other configuration backup is, likewise,
seriously needed.

This alternative can be provided by a combination of some type of
registry backup / restore facillity and 3rd-party disk-imaging /
restore software.

An example of the first is ERUNT (free - google "ERUNT download")
and an example of the second is "Paragon Backup and Recovery"
(google the same).

==

Cheers, Tim Meddick, Peckham, London. :-)

"Doc" wrote in message

...







Want to get as close as possible to starting from scratch with my XP
Pro installation without actually reinstalling. Would I gain
anything by first uninstalling all apps and then doing a system
restore? Or will I be wasting my time?

I used to use ERUNT.

ERUNT only backs up the registry.

If anything else gets corrupted, you are back to re-install the O.S.
or a disk image.

I use a batch file to copy backups of zipped programs, documents,
settings to a second drive
which I would use if my primary drive "bit the dust". :-)

Andy


The drawback to using a second internal drive (if that's what it is) or
an external always connected is that in case of a power surge/lightning
strike or other catastrophic event, you're liable to lose it all. That's
why I prefer doing images and incrementals on a regular basis to an
external drive that's connected only as I need it.

I still use ERUNT on both my XP and Win7 machines. KOW, I haven't had a
need for it, but it takes up little room and runs on its own.
--
SC Tom
-There's no such thing as TMI when asking for tech support.



 




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