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Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge



 
 
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  #196  
Old Yesterday, 10:09 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Chris
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 297
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

On 17/02/2019 16:56, Wolf K wrote:
On 2019-02-17 10:34, nospam wrote:
In ,
wrote:

not only that, but once humans get a license, it's forever.
No it isn't. If they seriously screw up, they get banned, made to
resit
their test or even go to jail.
yes, if they seriously screw up. otherwise, it's forever.
[...]

In Ontario, you must pass an eye test, cognitive test, and sometimes
also a driving test, every two years from age 80 onward. I think it
should start at a younger age, but not enough over-65 voters agree
with me.
Actually, older drivers are generally safe. It's the young (men) that
need
to be carefully checked in terms of the biggest risk to other road
users.

nope. new drivers and elderly drivers are the highest risk due to lack
of skill and loss of ability, respectively.

[...]

Correct, although the fine-grained details are a bit more complex. Stats
show that accident rates increase after licensing, reaching a max around
5 years after obtaining the licence. Since most people (in N. America)
get their licenses in the late teens to early 20s, "younger drivers"
mid- to late- 20s are a higher risk group. Stats also show that rates
decrease until about 40-45, then begin to rise rather slowly, then
increase faster from about age 60 onwards. By late 60s to early 70s,
accident rates are about the same for younger and older drivers.


Not in the UK. Accident rates are worst for the under 30s.

One of the main reasons for increasing accident rates among older
drivers is reduced peripheral vision, which translates into a smaller
visual field, hence reduced awarenessof possible hazards. Hence "I
didn't see X" is often the truth. IMO older drivers need re-training to
improve old habits and develop new ones.


Older drivers self-regulate better than younger ones. They avoid driving
in situations which they don't feel safe in e.g. in the dark, or in the
wet or motorways.


Ads
  #197  
Old Yesterday, 10:28 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Wolf K
wrote:

On 2019-02-17 15:22, nospam wrote:
[...]

nonsense.

[...]

nonsense.


[...]

nope.


[...]

Civil discourse at its best. Guaranteed to win hearts and minds and
usher in an age of sweetness, light, and rationality.


snipping to alter context. not cool.

i explained at length why what he wrote was nonsense. you chose to snip
it to attack.
  #198  
Old Yesterday, 10:28 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Wolf K
wrote:


Correct, although the fine-grained details are a bit more complex. Stats
show that accident rates increase after licensing, reaching a max around
5 years after obtaining the licence.

nope.

newly licensed drivers are the most dangerous, becoming safer as they
gain experience, bottoming out in the 30s-50s, and then rising again
around 60s.


Actually, newly licensed drivers have low accident rate for the first
year or so of driving, then the rates go up.


false.

https://one.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/olddrive/Figure6.gif

The usual explanation is
that as they gain experience, the gain over-confidence. This fact was
discovered when someone decided to take a look not at age but at driving
experience. It was one the oddities covered in the course qualifying me
as driving instructor.


that explanation is clearly wrong.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile...tion/6996326/f
igure/fig1/AS:[email protected]/Young-driver-crash-rates-as-
a-function-of-experience-time-licensed-and-distance-driven.png

https://www.researchgate.net/profile...ication/316105
710/figure/fig3/AS:[email protected]/Crash-rate-in-terms-of-
drivers-experience-years-in-driving.png

NB, that I pointed to "fine-grained details." The stats usually quoted
aren't fine-grained enough.


they don't need to be. the trends are clear.
  #199  
Old Yesterday, 10:28 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Chris
wrote:

On 17/02/2019 17:04, Ken Blake wrote:
On Sun, 17 Feb 2019 16:17:51 +0000, Stephen Wolstenholme
wrote:

On Sun, 17 Feb 2019 15:09:24 -0000 (UTC), Chris
wrote:


Actually, older drivers are generally safe. It's the young (men) that need
to be carefully checked in terms of the biggest risk to other road users.


That's true. When I was young I always drove much too fast. I was
usually trying to impress any girl I was with. One girl decided I was
a maniac and left me to go home on the bus.




I disagree. I think young drivers are often unsafe, and older drivers
are often unsafe because of poor vision, poor hearing, and poor
reflexes.

The safest drivers are the middle-aged.


The below suggests that the 60-79 age group is the safest (in the UK).
https://www.roadsafetyobservatory.co.../drivers/older


Ageing brings a number of sensory, psychomotor and cognitive
changes that may impact driving performance and safety.

in other words, older drivers are not the safest.

Although older drivers are overrepresented in deaths following a
car crash, this is mostly due to increased fragility.

that's a factor, but not as much as they claim.

except that deaths isn't the issue, but safe driving, which means
crashes.

In fact, accident involvement for older drivers is generally low.

because they drive less.

the numbers must be normalized to miles driven.

If the rate of slight injury is used as a proxy for accident
involvement it can be suggested that, when compared with young and
middle age groups, accident involvement is lowest for drivers aged
60-79, and only increases by 20% for drivers 80 and older (Mitchell,
2013).

slight injury is in no way a proxy for crash involvement.

as the article claims, older people are more fragile. what might be a
minor bruise at age 60 is an actual injury at age 80.
  #200  
Old Yesterday, 10:28 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Chris
wrote:

Older drivers self-regulate better than younger ones. They avoid driving
in situations which they don't feel safe in e.g. in the dark, or in the
wet or motorways.


not driving doesn't mean they're safer drivers. it just means their
exposure is less.

however, when they do drive, they're more of a risk than younger
drivers. the facts are clear.
  #201  
Old Today, 12:19 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Wolf K
wrote:

In article , Wolf K
wrote:
...



snipping to alter context. not cool.

i explained at length why what he wrote was nonsense. you chose to snip
it to attack.


To alter the topic, actually.


actually, not at all. not even close to correct.

Your data was interesting etc, but your
tone was annoying. It too often is. Pity.


ad hominem, which is what you invariably do.

stick to the topic. discuss why you think the data was interesting or
not interesting.
  #202  
Old Today, 12:19 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Wolf K
wrote:

Actually, newly licensed drivers have low accident rate for the first
year or so of driving, then the rates go up.

false.

https://one.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/olddrive/Figure6.gif

The usual explanation is
that as they gain experience, the gain over-confidence. This fact was
discovered when someone decided to take a look not at age but at driving
experience. It was one the oddities covered in the course qualifying me
as driving instructor.

that explanation is clearly wrong.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile...tion/6996326/f
igure/fig1/AS:[email protected]/Young-driver-crash-rates-as-
a-function-of-experience-time-licensed-and-distance-driven.png [...]


Newer data.


so what?
  #203  
Old Today, 07:15 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Wolf K
wrote:

ad hominem, which is what you invariably do.


Nope, alerting you to a personal quirk that annoys other people isn't an
ad hominem argument. I'm not attempting to refute your argument, merely
pointing out to you that too often you tone is annoying. NB that has
nothing to do with your logic, but it does affect your persuasiveness.


sure it is. your post served no other purpose than to attack.

i find your tone highly annoying, condescending and rude, but i don't
comment on that in my posts because it's irrelevant to the topic.

You don't persuade people by being logical. You persuade people by being
civil, by respecting them. Labelling a point as "nonsense" is neither
civil nor respectful.


when something is nonsense, it's entirely appropriate to call it that.

if a someone started babbling about how the earth is flat or the moon
landing was faked, the correct response is nonsense, because that's
exactly what it is. explaining why it's bs would be a complete waste of
time.

you also snipped the rest of the post you quoted, intentionally
altering the context, which went into great detail as to why i said
nonsense. you took words out of context just to attack. not cool.

no real surprise there, it's what you usually do.
  #204  
Old Today, 07:15 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,712
Default Microsoft 'Confirms' Windows 7 New Monthly Charge

In article , Wolf K
wrote:

Actually, newly licensed drivers have low accident rate for the first
year or so of driving, then the rates go up.
false.

https://one.nhtsa.gov/people/injury/olddrive/Figure6.gif

The usual explanation is
that as they gain experience, the gain over-confidence. This fact was
discovered when someone decided to take a look not at age but at driving
experience. It was one the oddities covered in the course qualifying me
as driving instructor.
that explanation is clearly wrong.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile...tion/6996326/f
igure/fig1/AS:[email protected]/Young-driver-crash-rates-as-
a-function-of-experience-time-licensed-and-distance-driven.png [...]

Newer data.


so what?


Sigh.

There's your incivility again. WTF are you trying to prove?


there's your ad hominem again.

so what if it's new data?

So I was acknowledging that the newer data are relevant. However, they
don't necessarily refute the older data,


yes it does.

you're just spewing what you were once told, which you blindly accepted
as being true, without ever questioning it.

not only does what you said not make sense, but the facts show it to be
false.

since any claim about some
phenomenon in the real world is always contingent on the facts as they
are known or knowable at the time. How the newer data relate to the
older data (which predates the cited sources by about 3 decades) isn't
clear, and frankly I'm not going to bother finding out the details,
since at best it would confirm what's already obvious, that something
changed.


nothing changed.
 




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