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Undeletable file. I'm stumped.



 
 
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  #91  
Old September 15th 12, 02:30 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
BillW50
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,556
Default Sharing pagefile.sys with Linux and Windows [ Undeletable file. I'm stumped.]

In ,
glee typed:
"BillW50" wrote in message
...
On 9/14/2012 6:00 PM, glee wrote:
"BillW50" wrote in message
...
On 9/14/2012 4:06 PM, glee wrote:
replies inline...
"BillW50" wrote in message
...
[snip]
Whoa! I found lots of URLs yesterday telling you how to use the
Windows swapfile under Linux. Although I couldn't find anybody
recommend it. Since it takes a performance hit when doing so.
They seem to suggest it is most useful when you don't have the
disk space
for a Linux swap partition...

I've seen a few mentions of it, but it requires a lot of tweaking
plus a
series of parameters at every startup to work, is not "supported",
and
definitely is not done by any distributions of Linux. It's
something
that's been played with by some users, but you won't find it as
even an
alternative on a Live CD as far as I know.
[snip]

Naw... it is very easy to do even permanently.

mkswap /mnt/data/pagefile.sys
swapon /mnt/data/pagefile.sys

Now permanently... you need an entry in your /etc/fstab file that
looks like this:
..
/mnt/data/pagefile.sys swap swap defaults 0 0
..
You're done!

Sharing a swap file with linux and windows
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...indows-109511/


Yes...that's the series of parameters that have to be added so they
run
at every boot, as I stated.
Matters not as far as a Live CD goes.... no standard Live CD is
going to
come this way... and it's Live CDs that we're talking about.


That isn't how I understand it.

mkswap /mnt/data/pagefile.sys
[makes or adjusts pagefile.sys for Linux use]

swapon /mnt/data/pagefile.sys
[sets pagefile.sys as swapfile]

If the two above has no problems you are good to modify the fstab
file.

/mnt/data/pagefile.sys swap swap defaults 0 0

Now it is permanent. Now you boot up and it automatically uses the
Windows swapfile. Works for live versions too. If Windows actually
uses it too, you need to add this in your /etc/rc.sysinit file so
Linux can adjust it for Linux.

mkswap /mnt/data/pagefile.sys

Now you simply bootup and the Windows swapfile will be used by Linux
with every boot. No series of parameters to add or anything.


I'm stating the same thing. By adding them to fstab, they are making
the change at every boot.... they run at every boot.
It isn't something that is built into any Live CD, which is the
original point of this discussion.


Oh wow! I never thought of it like that. Using that logic, Windows isn't
compatible with most PCs. As Windows uses the Windows registry to change
from the defaults. And it does this with every boot with every single
Windows install out there. Thus when you change the way Linux boots, but
only using what is supplied in the stock system. I personally call this
as built in support. I am not sure why you don't?

--
Bill
Gateway M465e ('06 era) - OE-QuoteFix v1.19.2
Centrino Core2 Duo T5600 1.83GHz - 4GB - Windows XP SP2


Ads
  #92  
Old September 15th 12, 04:49 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,617
Default Sharing pagefile.sys with Linux and Windows [ Undeletable file. I'm stumped.]

On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 08:30:37 -0500, "BillW50" wrote:

Oh wow! I never thought of it like that. Using that logic, Windows isn't
compatible with most PCs. As Windows uses the Windows registry to change
from the defaults. And it does this with every boot with every single
Windows install out there. Thus when you change the way Linux boots, but
only using what is supplied in the stock system. I personally call this
as built in support. I am not sure why you don't?


A word of advice: When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.

  #93  
Old September 15th 12, 05:32 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
BillW50
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,556
Default Sharing pagefile.sys with Linux and Windows [ Undeletablefile. I'm stumped.]

On 9/15/2012 10:49 AM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 08:30:37 -0500, wrote:

Oh wow! I never thought of it like that. Using that logic, Windows isn't
compatible with most PCs. As Windows uses the Windows registry to change
from the defaults. And it does this with every boot with every single
Windows install out there. Thus when you change the way Linux boots, but
only using what is supplied in the stock system. I personally call this
as built in support. I am not sure why you don't?


A word of advice: When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.


I'm not in a hole, but on the top of the world.

--
Bill
Gateway M465e ('06 era) - Thunderbird v12.0.1
Centrino Core2 Duo T5600 1.83GHz - 4GB - Windows XP SP2
  #94  
Old September 16th 12, 03:46 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,617
Default Sharing pagefile.sys with Linux and Windows [ Undeletable file. I'm stumped.]

On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 11:32:41 -0500, BillW50 wrote:

On 9/15/2012 10:49 AM, Char Jackson wrote:
On Sat, 15 Sep 2012 08:30:37 -0500, wrote:

Oh wow! I never thought of it like that. Using that logic, Windows isn't
compatible with most PCs. As Windows uses the Windows registry to change
from the defaults. And it does this with every boot with every single
Windows install out there. Thus when you change the way Linux boots, but
only using what is supplied in the stock system. I personally call this
as built in support. I am not sure why you don't?


A word of advice: When you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.


I'm not in a hole, but on the top of the world.


Look around, make sure you aren't in China. You've been digging so
long you might have popped out the other side.

  #95  
Old September 16th 12, 04:23 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
glee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,794
Default Sharing pagefile.sys with Linux and Windows [ Undeletable file. I'm stumped.]

"BillW50" wrote in message
...
In ,
glee typed:
[snip]
Whoa! I found lots of URLs yesterday telling you how to use the
Windows swapfile under Linux. Although I couldn't find anybody
recommend it. Since it takes a performance hit when doing so.
They seem to suggest it is most useful when you don't have the
disk space
for a Linux swap partition...

I've seen a few mentions of it, but it requires a lot of tweaking
plus a
series of parameters at every startup to work, is not
"supported",
and
definitely is not done by any distributions of Linux. It's
something
that's been played with by some users, but you won't find it as
even an
alternative on a Live CD as far as I know.
[snip]

Naw... it is very easy to do even permanently.

mkswap /mnt/data/pagefile.sys
swapon /mnt/data/pagefile.sys

Now permanently... you need an entry in your /etc/fstab file that
looks like this:
..
/mnt/data/pagefile.sys swap swap defaults 0 0
..
You're done!

Sharing a swap file with linux and windows
http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...indows-109511/


Yes...that's the series of parameters that have to be added so they
run
at every boot, as I stated.
Matters not as far as a Live CD goes.... no standard Live CD is
going to
come this way... and it's Live CDs that we're talking about.

That isn't how I understand it.

mkswap /mnt/data/pagefile.sys
[makes or adjusts pagefile.sys for Linux use]

swapon /mnt/data/pagefile.sys
[sets pagefile.sys as swapfile]

If the two above has no problems you are good to modify the fstab
file.

/mnt/data/pagefile.sys swap swap defaults 0 0

Now it is permanent. Now you boot up and it automatically uses the
Windows swapfile. Works for live versions too. If Windows actually
uses it too, you need to add this in your /etc/rc.sysinit file so
Linux can adjust it for Linux.

mkswap /mnt/data/pagefile.sys

Now you simply bootup and the Windows swapfile will be used by Linux
with every boot. No series of parameters to add or anything.


I'm stating the same thing. By adding them to fstab, they are making
the change at every boot.... they run at every boot.
It isn't something that is built into any Live CD, which is the
original point of this discussion.


Oh wow! I never thought of it like that. Using that logic, Windows
isn't compatible with most PCs. As Windows uses the Windows registry
to change from the defaults. And it does this with every boot with
every single Windows install out there. Thus when you change the way
Linux boots, but only using what is supplied in the stock system. I
personally call this as built in support. I am not sure why you don't?


No, actually there is no comparison between what the fstab file does in
Linux, and what Windows does with the Registry or any other config file.
The fstab file is primarily used for partition mounting and file system
configuration. Windows does not need user commands stored anywhere, to
mount volumes or determine file systems... they are mounted
automatically in Windows using info in the partition tables. The NTFS
file system stores mounts as NTFS junctions. Only drive letter
assignments are kept in the Registry, for the already-mounted volumes.
--
Glen Ventura
MS MVP Oct. 2002 - Sept. 2009
CompTIA A+

 




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