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Microsoft MVPs



 
 
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  #16  
Old October 20th 08, 03:54 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Ken Blake, MVP
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,402
Default Microsoft MVPs

On Sun, 19 Oct 2008 20:58:31 -0500, VanguardLH wrote:

PA Bear [MS MVP] wrote:

This a**hole is NOT an MVP!

The Real Truth MVP wrote:
There is none.


Ah yes, very true, but then the status of MVP has been diluted by real
MVPs that choose to hide. You can't check on their credentials because
they chose to hide. Gee, would you trust a doctor, dentist, or any
other self-claimed professional whose credentials you could not certify?
That MVPs can hide so their credentials are not public (which has
nothing to do with divulging private information) pretty much renders
the who concept worthless. Anyone could claim they are an MVP, like
Patricia here claiming to be one (after nymshifting away from her
pcbutts1 moniker). You don't need to go ego-stroking your status to
announce your MVP status to other MVPs. That ego-stroking is to
announce yourself to non-MVPs in a newsgroup (i.e., to the general
populace that visit there). To the public, if your self-claimed MVP
credentials cannot be traced to those that provide that certification
then you don't have those credentials as far as the public is concerned.
Unless the status of MVP is traceable, it means nothing.

I've looked at mvps.org. Didn't find anyone named "Bear" there. Looked
at https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx. There are
couple of "bear" names with that substring but nothing that would match
on the "pa" part of your moniker. So just how *we* non-MVPs visiting
the newsgroups know YOU aren't yet another troll pretending to be an
MVP? We can't so the claim to be an MVP cannot be verified which means
the MVP title is not only worthless but possibly deliberately
misleading.



His name, which he often uses in his messages (or else I wouldn't tell
you), is Robear Dyer. PA Bear is sort of a nickname. Go back to
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx and look for
Robear Dyer, which you will find there.

I can also personally vouch for his being an MVP, because I've several
times met him at MVP events at Microsoft in Seattle.


--
Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP - Windows Desktop Experience
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
Ads
  #17  
Old October 20th 08, 03:56 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Bruce Hagen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,235
Default Microsoft MVPs


"Bob Lucas" wrote in message
...
"Mike Hall - MVP" wrote in message
...
"VanguardLH" wrote in message
...
Bob Lucas wrote:

Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation
MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".

Some MVPs claim they don't want their private information published in a
public place. That doesn't preclude that they are *listed* as an MVP.
If an MVP doesn't have themself published in the MVP lists (and which
does NOT require any public disclosure of their personal info) then I
don't consider them an MVP. If you want to check on the credentials of
a cert that an employee claims to have, you check with the issuer to
find out if that cert was actually ever awarded to that person. If
someone claims they are an expert in some profession, they must provide
proof of such. Lack of proof means lack of expertise. I'm not allowed
to claim that I'm a doctor, cop, or any other professional without
having traceable credentials. To me, if they can't prove that they were
elected by other MVPs to become themself an MVP then I'm not going to
believe them just because they say so.

If an MVP wants to hide, consider why they want to hide. They don't
need to give out their street address, phone number, or any private
information. Obviously if they want to have an identity as an MVP then
*something* of them must be made public. If an MVP wants to hide from
the public but only let other MVPs know about their MVP status then let
them hide inside an MVP-only forum or MVP-only mailing list. If they
don't want to be public then don't claim to be an MVP in public.

If someone says they are an MVP but if the public can't verify that
status and if the one claiming to be an MVP can prove their status then
they aren't an MVP. Anyone can claim anything they want in the Usenet
anarchy. Hiding MVPs dilute the status and potence of the MVP title.



You have it all worked out, eh.

Some may not be public because their employers might think that they
would possibly do free work in works time.

Some employers may consider the MVP award status to be in competition
with what the company does/supplies.

Some MVPs may not be in a position politically.

PCButts is a wannabe..

--
Mike Hall - MVP
How to construct a good post..
http://dts-l.com/goodpost.htm
How to use the Microsoft Product Support Newsgroups..
http://support.microsoft.com/default...help&style=toc
Mike's Window - My Blog..
http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/default.aspx






Those are valid reasons for claiming anonymity.

However, I still believe that if a contributor to a newsgroup claims to be
an MVP, other contributors should be able to verify that appellation (in
the same way that members of the public can check the credentials of
doctors, dentists, lawyers, etc.)

MVPs provide a valuable service - and I am not decrying their expertise
and willingness to help. However, many non-MVPs also offer useful
contributions.

If an MVP does not want his name to appear on a public register, there is
nothing to prevent him/her from posting to newsgroups without claiming
membership of the MVP community. Regular newsgroup users will have little
difficulty forming an opinion about those contributors, who have provided
reliable contributions over a period of time.

The real danger comes from people who claim to be MVPs (which implies
special expertise and a willingness to help) - but are impostors.

Consequently, MVPs should be prepared to allow their names to appear on a
public register - OR refrain from using the MVP suffix when they post to
newsgroups.



I, for one, would have nothing against my name appearing in an official list
provided by MS. I just don't want my life history made public. They *could*
have two lists, but they don't. I have nothing I need to hide in my profile,
it's just a "nobody's business" thing.
--

Bruce Hagen
MS-MVP Outlook Express
Imperial Beach, CA

  #18  
Old October 20th 08, 06:04 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
db.·.. >
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 733
Default Microsoft MVPs

you're absolutely
correct and justified.

the problem originates
at the source, the microsoft
mvp program.

but one can not expect
the book to be open when
the books are corrupted or
embarrassing.
--

db·´¯`·...¸)))º

"Bob Lucas" wrote in message ...
"Mike Hall - MVP" wrote in message ...
"VanguardLH" wrote in message ...
Bob Lucas wrote:

Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".

Some MVPs claim they don't want their private information published in a
public place. That doesn't preclude that they are *listed* as an MVP.
If an MVP doesn't have themself published in the MVP lists (and which
does NOT require any public disclosure of their personal info) then I
don't consider them an MVP. If you want to check on the credentials of
a cert that an employee claims to have, you check with the issuer to
find out if that cert was actually ever awarded to that person. If
someone claims they are an expert in some profession, they must provide
proof of such. Lack of proof means lack of expertise. I'm not allowed
to claim that I'm a doctor, cop, or any other professional without
having traceable credentials. To me, if they can't prove that they were
elected by other MVPs to become themself an MVP then I'm not going to
believe them just because they say so.

If an MVP wants to hide, consider why they want to hide. They don't
need to give out their street address, phone number, or any private
information. Obviously if they want to have an identity as an MVP then
*something* of them must be made public. If an MVP wants to hide from
the public but only let other MVPs know about their MVP status then let
them hide inside an MVP-only forum or MVP-only mailing list. If they
don't want to be public then don't claim to be an MVP in public.

If someone says they are an MVP but if the public can't verify that
status and if the one claiming to be an MVP can prove their status then
they aren't an MVP. Anyone can claim anything they want in the Usenet
anarchy. Hiding MVPs dilute the status and potence of the MVP title.



You have it all worked out, eh.

Some may not be public because their employers might think that they would possibly do free work in works time.

Some employers may consider the MVP award status to be in competition with what the company does/supplies.

Some MVPs may not be in a position politically.

PCButts is a wannabe..

--
Mike Hall - MVP
How to construct a good post..
http://dts-l.com/goodpost.htm
How to use the Microsoft Product Support Newsgroups..
http://support.microsoft.com/default...help&style=toc
Mike's Window - My Blog..
http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/default.aspx






Those are valid reasons for claiming anonymity.

However, I still believe that if a contributor to a newsgroup claims to be an MVP, other contributors should be able to verify
that appellation (in the same way that members of the public can check the credentials of doctors, dentists, lawyers, etc.)

MVPs provide a valuable service - and I am not decrying their expertise and willingness to help. However, many non-MVPs also
offer useful contributions.

If an MVP does not want his name to appear on a public register, there is nothing to prevent him/her from posting to newsgroups
without claiming membership of the MVP community. Regular newsgroup users will have little difficulty forming an opinion about
those contributors, who have provided reliable contributions over a period of time.

The real danger comes from people who claim to be MVPs (which implies special expertise and a willingness to help) - but are
impostors.

Consequently, MVPs should be prepared to allow their names to appear on a public register - OR refrain from using the MVP suffix
when they post to newsgroups.


  #19  
Old October 20th 08, 07:39 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Bob Lucas
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 302
Default Microsoft MVPs

"Bruce Hagen" wrote in message
...

"Bob Lucas" wrote in message
...
"Mike Hall - MVP" wrote in message
...
"VanguardLH" wrote in message
...
Bob Lucas wrote:

Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation
MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the
Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to
share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the
search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for
your
search criteria".

Some MVPs claim they don't want their private information published
in a
public place. That doesn't preclude that they are *listed* as an
MVP.
If an MVP doesn't have themself published in the MVP lists (and
which
does NOT require any public disclosure of their personal info) then
I
don't consider them an MVP. If you want to check on the
credentials of
a cert that an employee claims to have, you check with the issuer
to
find out if that cert was actually ever awarded to that person. If
someone claims they are an expert in some profession, they must
provide
proof of such. Lack of proof means lack of expertise. I'm not
allowed
to claim that I'm a doctor, cop, or any other professional without
having traceable credentials. To me, if they can't prove that they
were
elected by other MVPs to become themself an MVP then I'm not going
to
believe them just because they say so.

If an MVP wants to hide, consider why they want to hide. They
don't
need to give out their street address, phone number, or any private
information. Obviously if they want to have an identity as an MVP
then
*something* of them must be made public. If an MVP wants to hide
from
the public but only let other MVPs know about their MVP status then
let
them hide inside an MVP-only forum or MVP-only mailing list. If
they
don't want to be public then don't claim to be an MVP in public.

If someone says they are an MVP but if the public can't verify that
status and if the one claiming to be an MVP can prove their status
then
they aren't an MVP. Anyone can claim anything they want in the
Usenet
anarchy. Hiding MVPs dilute the status and potence of the MVP
title.


You have it all worked out, eh.

Some may not be public because their employers might think that they
would possibly do free work in works time.

Some employers may consider the MVP award status to be in
competition with what the company does/supplies.

Some MVPs may not be in a position politically.

PCButts is a wannabe..

--
Mike Hall - MVP
How to construct a good post..
http://dts-l.com/goodpost.htm
How to use the Microsoft Product Support Newsgroups..
http://support.microsoft.com/default...help&style=toc
Mike's Window - My Blog..
http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/default.aspx






Those are valid reasons for claiming anonymity.

However, I still believe that if a contributor to a newsgroup claims
to be an MVP, other contributors should be able to verify that
appellation (in the same way that members of the public can check the
credentials of doctors, dentists, lawyers, etc.)

MVPs provide a valuable service - and I am not decrying their
expertise and willingness to help. However, many non-MVPs also offer
useful contributions.

If an MVP does not want his name to appear on a public register,
there is nothing to prevent him/her from posting to newsgroups
without claiming membership of the MVP community. Regular newsgroup
users will have little difficulty forming an opinion about those
contributors, who have provided reliable contributions over a period
of time.

The real danger comes from people who claim to be MVPs (which implies
special expertise and a willingness to help) - but are impostors.

Consequently, MVPs should be prepared to allow their names to appear
on a public register - OR refrain from using the MVP suffix when they
post to newsgroups.



I, for one, would have nothing against my name appearing in an
official list provided by MS. I just don't want my life history made
public. They *could* have two lists, but they don't. I have nothing I
need to hide in my profile, it's just a "nobody's business" thing.
--

Bruce Hagen
MS-MVP Outlook Express
Imperial Beach, CA



That would be a very sensible compromise.

"Consumers" certainly don't need access to an individual MVP's life
history or similar details (although it might be useful to specify
particular areas of expertise or specialisation. For BH, such expertise
would include Outlook Express).

However, inclusion in an official list of MVPs (names only) might deter
unqualified passers-by from claiming fraudulently that they have been
awarded MVP status.

  #20  
Old October 20th 08, 07:48 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Leonard Grey[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,048
Default Microsoft MVPs

I'm thinking about a suitable designation for people like me: Certified
Shlemiel, or CS.

What's that you say? Oh...you already know I'm a shlemiel, even without
a designation.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

Bob Lucas wrote:
"Bruce Hagen" wrote in message
...

"Bob Lucas" wrote in message
...
"Mike Hall - MVP" wrote in message
...
"VanguardLH" wrote in message
...
Bob Lucas wrote:

Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation
MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to
share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for
your
search criteria".

Some MVPs claim they don't want their private information published
in a
public place. That doesn't preclude that they are *listed* as an MVP.
If an MVP doesn't have themself published in the MVP lists (and which
does NOT require any public disclosure of their personal info) then I
don't consider them an MVP. If you want to check on the
credentials of
a cert that an employee claims to have, you check with the issuer to
find out if that cert was actually ever awarded to that person. If
someone claims they are an expert in some profession, they must
provide
proof of such. Lack of proof means lack of expertise. I'm not
allowed
to claim that I'm a doctor, cop, or any other professional without
having traceable credentials. To me, if they can't prove that they
were
elected by other MVPs to become themself an MVP then I'm not going to
believe them just because they say so.

If an MVP wants to hide, consider why they want to hide. They don't
need to give out their street address, phone number, or any private
information. Obviously if they want to have an identity as an MVP
then
*something* of them must be made public. If an MVP wants to hide from
the public but only let other MVPs know about their MVP status then
let
them hide inside an MVP-only forum or MVP-only mailing list. If they
don't want to be public then don't claim to be an MVP in public.

If someone says they are an MVP but if the public can't verify that
status and if the one claiming to be an MVP can prove their status
then
they aren't an MVP. Anyone can claim anything they want in the Usenet
anarchy. Hiding MVPs dilute the status and potence of the MVP title.


You have it all worked out, eh.

Some may not be public because their employers might think that they
would possibly do free work in works time.

Some employers may consider the MVP award status to be in
competition with what the company does/supplies.

Some MVPs may not be in a position politically.

PCButts is a wannabe..

--
Mike Hall - MVP
How to construct a good post..
http://dts-l.com/goodpost.htm
How to use the Microsoft Product Support Newsgroups..
http://support.microsoft.com/default...help&style=toc
Mike's Window - My Blog..
http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/default.aspx






Those are valid reasons for claiming anonymity.

However, I still believe that if a contributor to a newsgroup claims
to be an MVP, other contributors should be able to verify that
appellation (in the same way that members of the public can check the
credentials of doctors, dentists, lawyers, etc.)

MVPs provide a valuable service - and I am not decrying their
expertise and willingness to help. However, many non-MVPs also offer
useful contributions.

If an MVP does not want his name to appear on a public register,
there is nothing to prevent him/her from posting to newsgroups
without claiming membership of the MVP community. Regular newsgroup
users will have little difficulty forming an opinion about those
contributors, who have provided reliable contributions over a period
of time.

The real danger comes from people who claim to be MVPs (which implies
special expertise and a willingness to help) - but are impostors.

Consequently, MVPs should be prepared to allow their names to appear
on a public register - OR refrain from using the MVP suffix when they
post to newsgroups.



I, for one, would have nothing against my name appearing in an
official list provided by MS. I just don't want my life history made
public. They *could* have two lists, but they don't. I have nothing I
need to hide in my profile, it's just a "nobody's business" thing.
--

Bruce Hagen
MS-MVP Outlook Express
Imperial Beach, CA



That would be a very sensible compromise.

"Consumers" certainly don't need access to an individual MVP's life
history or similar details (although it might be useful to specify
particular areas of expertise or specialisation. For BH, such expertise
would include Outlook Express).

However, inclusion in an official list of MVPs (names only) might deter
unqualified passers-by from claiming fraudulently that they have been
awarded MVP status.

  #21  
Old October 20th 08, 07:52 PM posted to microsoft.public.outlookexpress.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
PA Bear [MS MVP]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,010
Default Microsoft MVPs

Wrong! (And the real "nass" doesn't post as "nass [MVP]".)

nass [MVP] wrote:
Hi, my name nass.
I am a NEW [MVP], and so happy.
I am over the sun with happinesas, and so is my business.
Business is booming; I have lot specialos
I choose to hide my name on that list, as I am shy.


Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".

  #22  
Old October 20th 08, 07:55 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
db.·.. >
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 733
Default Microsoft MVPs

lol,

some doors should
not be opened..!

--

db·´¯`·...¸)))º

"Leonard Grey" wrote in message ...
I'm thinking about a suitable designation for people like me: Certified Shlemiel, or CS.

What's that you say? Oh...you already know I'm a shlemiel, even without a designation.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

Bob Lucas wrote:
"Bruce Hagen" wrote in message ...

"Bob Lucas" wrote in message ...
"Mike Hall - MVP" wrote in message ...
"VanguardLH" wrote in message ...
Bob Lucas wrote:

Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".

Some MVPs claim they don't want their private information published in a
public place. That doesn't preclude that they are *listed* as an MVP.
If an MVP doesn't have themself published in the MVP lists (and which
does NOT require any public disclosure of their personal info) then I
don't consider them an MVP. If you want to check on the credentials of
a cert that an employee claims to have, you check with the issuer to
find out if that cert was actually ever awarded to that person. If
someone claims they are an expert in some profession, they must provide
proof of such. Lack of proof means lack of expertise. I'm not allowed
to claim that I'm a doctor, cop, or any other professional without
having traceable credentials. To me, if they can't prove that they were
elected by other MVPs to become themself an MVP then I'm not going to
believe them just because they say so.

If an MVP wants to hide, consider why they want to hide. They don't
need to give out their street address, phone number, or any private
information. Obviously if they want to have an identity as an MVP then
*something* of them must be made public. If an MVP wants to hide from
the public but only let other MVPs know about their MVP status then let
them hide inside an MVP-only forum or MVP-only mailing list. If they
don't want to be public then don't claim to be an MVP in public.

If someone says they are an MVP but if the public can't verify that
status and if the one claiming to be an MVP can prove their status then
they aren't an MVP. Anyone can claim anything they want in the Usenet
anarchy. Hiding MVPs dilute the status and potence of the MVP title.


You have it all worked out, eh.

Some may not be public because their employers might think that they would possibly do free work in works time.

Some employers may consider the MVP award status to be in competition with what the company does/supplies.

Some MVPs may not be in a position politically.

PCButts is a wannabe..

--
Mike Hall - MVP
How to construct a good post..
http://dts-l.com/goodpost.htm
How to use the Microsoft Product Support Newsgroups..
http://support.microsoft.com/default...help&style=toc
Mike's Window - My Blog..
http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/default.aspx






Those are valid reasons for claiming anonymity.

However, I still believe that if a contributor to a newsgroup claims to be an MVP, other contributors should be able to verify
that appellation (in the same way that members of the public can check the credentials of doctors, dentists, lawyers, etc.)

MVPs provide a valuable service - and I am not decrying their expertise and willingness to help. However, many non-MVPs also
offer useful contributions.

If an MVP does not want his name to appear on a public register, there is nothing to prevent him/her from posting to newsgroups
without claiming membership of the MVP community. Regular newsgroup users will have little difficulty forming an opinion about
those contributors, who have provided reliable contributions over a period of time.

The real danger comes from people who claim to be MVPs (which implies special expertise and a willingness to help) - but are
impostors.

Consequently, MVPs should be prepared to allow their names to appear on a public register - OR refrain from using the MVP
suffix when they post to newsgroups.


I, for one, would have nothing against my name appearing in an official list provided by MS. I just don't want my life history
made public. They *could* have two lists, but they don't. I have nothing I need to hide in my profile, it's just a "nobody's
business" thing.
--

Bruce Hagen
MS-MVP Outlook Express
Imperial Beach, CA



That would be a very sensible compromise.

"Consumers" certainly don't need access to an individual MVP's life history or similar details (although it might be useful to
specify particular areas of expertise or specialisation. For BH, such expertise would include Outlook Express).

However, inclusion in an official list of MVPs (names only) might deter unqualified passers-by from claiming fraudulently that
they have been awarded MVP status.


  #23  
Old October 20th 08, 08:03 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Leonard Grey[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,048
Default Microsoft MVPs

Or maybe CFS - for Certified "Forking" Shlemiel.
Whaddaya think?
--
Leonard Grey [CFS]
Errare Humanum Est


"Leonard Grey" wrote

I'm thinking about a suitable designation for people like me: Certified
Shlemiel, or CS.

What's that you say? Oh...you already know I'm a shlemiel, even without
a designation.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

  #24  
Old October 20th 08, 08:11 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Leonard Grey[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,048
Default Microsoft MVPs

Over the weekend I made a promise I wouldn't respond to my impersonator.

And I won't.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

Leonard Grey wrote:
Or maybe CFS - for Certified "Forking" Shlemiel.
Whaddaya think?
--
Leonard Grey [CFS]
Errare Humanum Est


"Leonard Grey" wrote

I'm thinking about a suitable designation for people like me: Certified
Shlemiel, or CS.

What's that you say? Oh...you already know I'm a shlemiel, even without
a designation.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

  #25  
Old October 20th 08, 08:22 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
Tom [Pepper] Willett[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 751
Default Microsoft MVPs


:
: However, inclusion in an official list of MVPs (names only) might deter
: unqualified passers-by from claiming fraudulently that they have been
: awarded MVP status.

It's a legal/privacy issue with microsoft.

:


  #27  
Old October 20th 08, 09:08 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support
nass
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,474
Default Microsoft MVPs

En you just Brokeden you Promised. I'm shameded of You.
nass
--
http://www.nasstec.co.uk


"Leonard Grey " wrote

Over the weekend I made a promise I wouldn't respond to my impersonator.

And I won't.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

Leonard Grey wrote:
Or maybe CFS - for Certified "Forking" Shlemiel.
Whaddaya think?
--
Leonard Grey [CFS]
Errare Humanum Est


"Leonard Grey" wrote

I'm thinking about a suitable designation for people like me: Certified
Shlemiel, or CS.

What's that you say? Oh...you already know I'm a shlemiel, even without
a designation.
---
Leonard Grey
Errare Humanum Est

  #28  
Old October 20th 08, 09:11 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.outlookexpress.general
nass [MVP]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Microsoft MVPs

YOU are the one WRONG!
You are LIAR TROLL
I am MVP, you are pig swill fake!
--
HTH
nass
---
http://www.nasstec.co.uk



"PA Bear [MS MVP]" wrote:

Wrong! (And the real "nass" doesn't post as "nass [MVP]".)

nass [MVP] wrote:
Hi, my name nass.
I am a NEW [MVP], and so happy.
I am over the sun with happinesas, and so is my business.
Business is booming; I have lot specialos
I choose to hide my name on that list, as I am shy.


Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".


  #29  
Old October 20th 08, 09:13 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.outlookexpress.general,microsoft.public.windows.live.messenger,microsoft.public.windows.live.mail.desktop
nass [MVP]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Microsoft MVPs

Fellow posters:

You know me.
PA Bear is a are LIAR TROLL
I am MVP, he is pig swill fake!
--
HTH
nass
---
http://www.nasstec.co.uk



"Bob Lucas" wrote:


Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft
MVP Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".


  #30  
Old October 20th 08, 09:14 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support,microsoft.public.outlookexpress.general,microsoft.public.windows.live.messenger,microsoft.public.windows.live.mail.desktop
nass [MVP]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 79
Default Microsoft MVPs

Fellow posters:

You know me.
PA Bear is a are LIAR TROLL
I am MVP, he is pig swill fake!
--
HTH
nass
---
http://www.nasstec.co.uk



"Bruce Hagen" wrote:


"Bob Lucas" wrote in message
...

Are there any special rules governing the use of the designation MS-MVP?

I ask the question because, according to the page at
https://mvp.support.microsoft.com/communities/mvp.aspx, the Microsoft MVP
Awardee directory contains a listing of all MVPs that want to share
information publicly.

However, when I conducted advanced searches against the names of
contributors to several newsgroups (who claim to be MVPs), the search
engine produced the following response "No results were found for your
search criteria".



What do you get for me? It should come up empty as I do not have my profile
public, but other MVPs can access it.

On occasion, you may see a troll impersonating an MVP.
--

Bruce Hagen
MS-MVP Outlook Express
Imperial Beach, CA


 




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