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Telephone company switch



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 29th 19, 02:42 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
AK[_4_]
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Posts: 9
Default Telephone company switch

Just curious.

Frontier has a building close to me that is used for the plain old telephone system.

I was wondering what is in that building and what is it called?

It has no windows.

I found this.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/telephone2.htm

Andy
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  #2  
Old March 29th 19, 03:26 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 2,564
Default Telephone company switch

In message , AK
writes:
Just curious.

Frontier has a building close to me that is used for the plain old
telephone system.

I was wondering what is in that building and what is it called?

It has no windows.


In the UK, it's generally known as the "telephone exchange"; it is
what's at the other end of the wires that come into your home. All the
connection equipment, the bits that separate your telephone from your
broadband (assuming you get that through your 'phone line), the
switching equipment, the concentrating equipment, the batteries that
keep it going during power cuts, and so on.

I found this.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/telephone2.htm

Andy

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

[What's your guilty pleasure?] Why should you feel guilty about pleasure? -
Michel Roux Jr in Radio Times 2-8 February 2013
  #3  
Old March 29th 19, 04:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul in Houston TX[_2_]
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Posts: 902
Default Telephone company switch

AK wrote:
Just curious.

Frontier has a building close to me that is used for the plain old telephone system.

I was wondering what is in that building and what is it called?

It has no windows.

I found this.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/telephone2.htm

Andy


CO - Central Office
http://www.sandman.com/colookup.asp



  #4  
Old March 29th 19, 04:17 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 8,758
Default Telephone company switch

AK wrote:
Just curious.

Frontier has a building close to me that is used for the plain old telephone system.

I was wondering what is in that building and what is it called?

It has no windows.

I found this.

https://electronics.howstuffworks.com/telephone2.htm

Andy


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remote_concentrator

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digita...ss_multiplexer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telephone_exchange

And so on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...phone_switches

Between cities...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchr...cal_networking

Many (but not all) have battery_room + generator

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery_room

Sample buildings. What I find interesting about most of
these, is there's no sign of emergency power systems.
They've got to be in there. You need to have at least
a battery room. I like how one of the pictures like
this I could find, there's razor wire to keep people
from climbing the fence. They don't do that here.
Just a moat and alligators :-)

http://www.co-buildings.com/az/520/

Finally, a sample with an external exhaust pipe. There
is likely a generator and battery room in the section
with the exhaust pipe. Sometimes the shape of the
building, gives away what is inside it. You might be
able to run on battery for 24 hours in some cases - but
not in the larger COs that are "all digital", as they're
power pigs.

http://www.co-buildings.com/va/804/bethia_tb.jpg

Even our cell towers here, finally got their own
generators. But it took a prolonged outage, and all
the cell towers going down at once, to make it apparent
they needed to fix that. Now, when they put up a new
cell tower, there's a cute little generator building
next to it.

The only problem with the cell tower idea, is I don't
think anyone has a plan, to drive around to all the
cell towers and fill up the tanks, if there is an
extended outage. They're still probably depending
on the power coming back, relatively quickly.

Paul
  #5  
Old March 29th 19, 11:39 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
John Dulak[_2_]
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Posts: 42
Default Telephone company switch

On 3/29/2019 12:17 AM, Paul wrote:


The only problem with the cell tower idea, is I don't
think anyone has a plan, to drive around to all the
cell towers and fill up the tanks, if there is an
extended outage. They're still probably depending
on the power coming back, relatively quickly.

Paul


Paul:

Many emergency generators run on natural gas from a utility company. This is
available mostly in more densely populated areas so the cell towers would stay
up for a lot of users. Out in the boondocks - who knows.

John


--
  #6  
Old March 29th 19, 01:33 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 8,758
Default Telephone company switch

John Dulak wrote:
On 3/29/2019 12:17 AM, Paul wrote:


The only problem with the cell tower idea, is I don't
think anyone has a plan, to drive around to all the
cell towers and fill up the tanks, if there is an
extended outage. They're still probably depending
on the power coming back, relatively quickly.

Paul


Paul:

Many emergency generators run on natural gas from a utility company.
This is available mostly in more densely populated areas so the cell
towers would stay up for a lot of users. Out in the boondocks - who knows.

John


My home is heated by natural gas.

I think they like the comfort of having
a captive tank full of diesel for the job.

Same with the sewer pumping station, which has
a tank of diesel.

We have sufficient plumbing in the city, to run
anything you could want on natural gas. It's everywhere.

Sure, the natural gas system has a certain level of
redundancy in it. But think about this.

What is your earthquake plan ?

The phone system has to run after an earthquake.
If natural gas is leaking (trunk failure), it's
going to be turned off.

*******

Even a CO which is not on an active fault, has
an earthquake spec to meet. The equipment frames
are tied into members embedded in the concrete floor.
The frames are allowed to "sway". For a certain
amount of earthquake, there's a known amount of
deflection allowed for. And the interconnecting
cables are wrapped, with earthquake in mind.

A CO in SF likely has a different spec to meet,
than one of ours here. But even so, we don't rely
on natural gas.

And the phone company is filled with traditionalists.
They will continue to use lead acid batteries
instead of lithium, as the maintenance requirements
on lead acid are well known. There's less chance of a
fire.

In the event of an air conditioning failure in the
CO, the doors fly open, and the building is then
air cooled. The room temp rises to between 40C and
50C, and all the equipment has to take that. And that
defines the "temp spec". So if you're wondering why
the doors have a "latch to keep them open", there's
a reason.

While lots of aspects of the phone system "look cheap",
they do think about a few things. Who hasn't seen a
pedestal housing a punch-down block, lying out in the
weather with no protection, and nobody to care for it ?
That's a trademark of the phone company.

The only thing we don't do here, is lay cables on the
ground. Apparently, some areas allow this. Our wires
are always elevated. If it goes outside, it "flies
through the air", so it's less likely to snag on
something. Subdivisions have right-of-ways for such
routing. Not even the cable TV guys lay cable on
the ground here. It just isn't done.

And the main feed (multiple fiber optic cables) to my
neighborhood, is trenched below grade. That one isn't
aerial, as there's a considerable barrier in the way.
Even the hydro feed to the substation got buried. They
could have used towers, but buried it instead. Just
another one of those infrastructure rules at work...

Paul
 




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