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Braiding electrical wiring



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 21st 18, 02:03 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Peter Jason
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,911
Default Braiding electrical wiring

Like this....
https://bagntell.files.wordpress.com...ided-strap.jpg
.... with a view to use thinner hookup wire to
power HDDs, instead of using commercial black
preformed braid.
Does this affect the electrical properties?
Peter
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  #2  
Old June 21st 18, 03:48 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul in Houston TX[_2_]
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Posts: 820
Default Braiding electrical wiring

Peter Jason wrote:
Like this....
https://bagntell.files.wordpress.com...ided-strap.jpg
... with a view to use thinner hookup wire to
power HDDs, instead of using commercial black
preformed braid.
Does this affect the electrical properties?
Peter


My opinion:
Look up the power transmission characteristics of your proposed wire.
Wire has a certain ohms per unit length per cross sectional area and
per metal composition of the wire. Increasing the length means
power loss. Thinning the wire means power loss.
If I were to thin the wire then I would double the number of strands.
i.e.: run a pair of 20 gauge stranded vs. a single 16 gauge stranded
for the same power requirements. Or you could use thin pure silver wire.

DC can safely be run parallel. No need to X cross the wire.
But if the power is pulsed or has an AC component then braiding
in an X (90 degree) fashion would lower the cross talk but it will
lengthen the wire. (Right-Hand Rule.)
Short runs of parallel are usually ok.



  #3  
Old June 21st 18, 05:31 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Peter Jason
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,911
Default Braiding electrical wiring

On Wed, 20 Jun 2018 21:48:54 -0500, Paul in
Houston TX wrote:

Peter Jason wrote:
Like this....
https://bagntell.files.wordpress.com...ided-strap.jpg
... with a view to use thinner hookup wire to
power HDDs, instead of using commercial black
preformed braid.
Does this affect the electrical properties?
Peter


My opinion:
Look up the power transmission characteristics of your proposed wire.
Wire has a certain ohms per unit length per cross sectional area and
per metal composition of the wire. Increasing the length means
power loss. Thinning the wire means power loss.
If I were to thin the wire then I would double the number of strands.
i.e.: run a pair of 20 gauge stranded vs. a single 16 gauge stranded
for the same power requirements. Or you could use thin pure silver wire.

DC can safely be run parallel. No need to X cross the wire.
But if the power is pulsed or has an AC component then braiding
in an X (90 degree) fashion would lower the cross talk but it will
lengthen the wire. (Right-Hand Rule.)
Short runs of parallel are usually ok.


I want to give each HDD/SSD and optical drive its
own power lead to get away from the stiff ganged
plugs now used. I'll test the result on one
drive & report back in 2 weeks.
 




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