A Windows XP help forum. PCbanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PCbanter forum » Windows 10 » Windows 10 Help Forum
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks ClassicShell



 
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #16  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:20 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 03:52:15 -0500, GlowingBlueMist wrote:

Once again Microsoft has found a way to break the Classic Shell program
that many people use as a replacement for Microsoft's much hated "Start"
button at least on my two W10 Pro Insider machines.


Why would anyone need Classic Shell anymore, given that Windows 10 has
native Cascade Menus? (This question assumes that is all you want out of
the Classic Shell software.)

After "fighting" Microsoft for years, with both the Classic Shell and with
WinAero, a few weeks ago I decided to try to learn how to implement the
cascade menu within Windows 10 using only Windows-10-native commands.

Windows 10 native Cascade Menus work just like Windows XP native Cascade
Menus.

There's no difference (AFAICT).

It's pretty easy to set up if all you want is a cascaded menu that is just
like the Windows XP cascaded menu used to be. There are a few tricks you
need, but other than those tricks, it's 100% native Windows 10 Cascade Menu
stuff.

Here's a screenshot of my cascaded menu (which is still being organized).
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_my_win10_cascade_menu.jpg

Notice there is absolutely no meaningful difference between the setup and
operation of the native Windows 10 cascade menu from the native Windows XP
cascade menu.

Given that there is no difference, and assuming all you want from the
Classic Shell is that Cascade Menu, why bother with Classic Shell?
Ads
  #17  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:28 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 07:15:20 -0400, Big Al wrote:

But I've now been using Win10's own start menu and find it isn't that
bad. Sure it's nowhere near 7's but if you clean off the crap and
organize your stuff in nice groups and widen the menu so you can get
more icons, it's not bad, even usable. I mean how many programs does
the average non-power user use?


Why do we even need Classic Shell anymore?

I also only recently decided to ditch Classic Shell and WinAero in order to
learn how to wrestle Windows 10 native menus into doing what I want them to
do.

For example, here's my (currently unfinished) Windows 10 Start Menu:
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_win10menu808.jpg

It has the exact same hierarchy as my (just as unfinished) Windows 10
Cascade Menu - which works exactly as the Windows XP Cascade Menu worked:
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_my_win10_cascade_menu.jpg

Notice there is absolutely no meaningful difference between the setup and
operation of the native Windows 10 cascade menu from the native Windows XP
cascade menu.

Given that there is no difference, and assuming all we want from the
Classic Shell software is that Cascade Menu, why bother with Classic Shell?
  #18  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:34 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 07:49:06 -0400, Keith Nuttle wrote:

I find I can access items in the native Windows 10 start, much faster
that I ever could in Older version of Windows start menus.

One of the best things about Windows 10 Start is the absence of the old
collapsing folder system. That was one of the hardest thing ever
developed by Microsoft. For deep folders I always took two or more
tries to get where I wanted to go.


There are inherently three menu systems native in Windows 10.
1. The heterodox (alphabetical) Start Menu
2. The orthodox (tiled) Start Menu
3. The Cascade Menu (which works just like it did in WinXP days)

All three work just fine, only differently.

Here's an example of the Windows 10 native orthodox & cascade menu:
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_win10menu808.jpg

Both are point-and-click setup operations, once you learn the tricks.

Given that Windows 10 has the Cascade Menu native, I don't see any need for
Classic Shell nowadays, if ... if all we want from Classic Shell is the
cascade menu.

Can someone tell me why people use the Classic Shell when Windows 10
already has Cascade Menus that work exactly like WinXP cascade menus
worked?
  #19  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:38 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 09:27:21 -0400, SilverSlimer wrote:

The start menu, as you say, is much better in 10
than it ever was


I consider myself a menu expert, at least at the user level, where my
assessment is that the Windows 10 orthodox start menu is an utter
abomination, but, it certainly "can" be made to work reasonably well, as I
show in this screenshot below...
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_win10menu808.jpg

There are a few tricks, which I have written into the menu tutorial, which,
once you know, it's pretty easy to manage that orthodox start menu.

In addition, if you know the tricks, it's just as easy to manage the
Windows 10 heterodox start menu (i.e., the alphabetical Start Menu).

And, if you know a couple more tricks, it's very easy to manage the Windows
10 native Cascade menu such that it works exactly like the WinXP Cascade
Menu worked (point and click edits and all that easy stuff).
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_my_win10_cascade_menu.jpg

Given what I just said, can someone explain to me why anyone would use the
Classic Shell today (and yes, I used Classic Shell in the past so I know it
does more than just a Cascade Menu).
  #20  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:43 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 09:32:46 -0400, Big Al wrote:

I think the process of change is the issue.


While change certainly is a factor, it's LOST FUNCTIONALITY if you don't
know how to get Windows 10 do have a Cascade Menu like Windows XP had.

So that's MORE than just change... it's less functionality (and we all know
there's almost nothing you can do on Windows 10 that you can't do on the
earlier operating systems, as we have an entire thread on that topic
alone).

So it's not change. It's lost functionality that causes people to want to
use the Classic Shell (IMHO).

Luckily, nowadays anyway, Windows 10 has the *same* cascade menu that
Windows XP had, so, if that's all anyone wants from the Classic Shell, then
there's absolutely no reason for the classic shell (IMHO).

In the end, the only change between the Windows XP style cascade menu and
the Windows 10 style cascade menu is that you just have to know how to
create the Windows 10 one, whereas in Windows XP, it sort of created
itself.

Other than that, what's the difference between the native Windows 10
cascade menu and the native Windows XP cascade menu?
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_win10menu808.jpg
  #21  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:59 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 16:41:06 -0400, Keith Nuttle wrote:

This is the native Windows 10 Start page. You can add or subtract the
program icons on the Start page so the Start page shows only the things
you want.

You don't have to drag them. Go to the program either the list that is
part of the start menu, OR to the actual file itself, right click and
select pin to start. Doing the same thing you can pin them to the task
manager.

I have about 30 of my most frequently used programs on the start menu,
and 10 of my main programs on the task bar.


Please be careful with those instructions as they only work half the time.

There are tricks that you need to know (and which I wrote up in my tutorial
on the subject) to make those instructions work all the time.

But without those tricks, those instructions fail half the time.
  #22  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:59 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 13:30:11 -0700, mike wrote:

I don't understand why people get their panties in a twist over
the start menu.


There are three menu systems native on Windows 10:
1. The orthodox (tiled) start menu
2. The heterodox (alphabetical) start menu
3. The cascade menu

Once you know a few tricks, they are all easy to manage
(although the orthodox start menu has icon quirks as we've seen with the
Tor Browser icon and the Opera browser icon being screwed up).

Delete everything on it and drag program launcher links to it.


It's even easier than dragging since most of the time you can "Pin to
Start", and if you know a few tricks, then all of the time you can "Pin to
Start".
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_my_win10_cascade_menu.jpg

While the Win10 Start Menu is limited to 500 groups, the only major flaw in
the Win10 orthodox start menu is the lack of more than two levels of
hierarchy.

Other than that, and other than the fact that icons don't have names when
you shrink them, and that the icon database is binary (as Paul has found
out for us) so you can't understand it easily - the Windows 10 orthodox
start menu isn't all that bad.

You just have to learn a few tricks to deal with it.

I take it a step further and create a separate page that loads at boot
and has all my program launchers on it.


Why not just create a Windows 10 native Cascade Menu for your launchers?
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_win10menu808.jpg

I use MS software only when
freeware doesn't exist...and that's rarely.


Me too.

Other than MS Office, I can't think of anything that I can't do with
freeware that I need to do on a home desktop computer.

Can you?
  #23  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:59 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 15:45:17 -0000 (UTC), Dave wrote:

I realize some people are stuck with
windows due to their work situation and the vast majority of folks are
stuck with windows because it came pre-loaded on their system.


IMHO, Windows and Linux do the same things nowadays, except ...

Except Microsoft Office.

(Yes, I know about all those other "office" clones.)
  #24  
Old June 22nd 18, 07:59 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 13:39:53 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

I don't think they were entirely wrong in what they did, but they made
a giant mistake in not providing both interfaces with a clear choice
between them.


I'm not sure what you mean by "both interfaces", but, as far as I know,
Windows 10 natively has both the Cascade Menu and the Orthodox Start Menu
(tiled menu) [and the heterodox Start Menu, aka alphabetical menu].

Here's the WinXP native and Win10 native Cascade Menu, side by side:
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_my_win10_cascade_menu.jpg

I don't understand why people seem to be saying that Windows 10 doesn't
have the *same* cascade menu that Windows XP had.

Please explain, as I'm confused since my system is 100% native Win10 and it
has both the orthodox (tiled) start menu and a cascade menu.

[Am I the only one who is confused here as to why Classic Shell is needed?]
  #25  
Old June 22nd 18, 01:22 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Big Al[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,218
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks ClassicShell

On 06/22/2018 02:59 AM, Arlen Holder wrote:
On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 13:39:53 -0700, Ken Blake wrote:

I don't think they were entirely wrong in what they did, but they made
a giant mistake in not providing both interfaces with a clear choice
between them.


I'm not sure what you mean by "both interfaces", but, as far as I know,
Windows 10 natively has both the Cascade Menu and the Orthodox Start Menu
(tiled menu) [and the heterodox Start Menu, aka alphabetical menu].

Here's the WinXP native and Win10 native Cascade Menu, side by side:
http://img4.imagetitan.com/img.php?image=18_my_win10_cascade_menu.jpg

I don't understand why people seem to be saying that Windows 10 doesn't
have the *same* cascade menu that Windows XP had.

Please explain, as I'm confused since my system is 100% native Win10 and it
has both the orthodox (tiled) start menu and a cascade menu.

[Am I the only one who is confused here as to why Classic Shell is needed?]

How did you get that cascade menu in operation. I've never seen this
and I'd go as far to say that others haven't either.

  #26  
Old June 22nd 18, 01:35 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Big Al[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,218
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks ClassicShell

On 06/21/2018 09:37 PM, SilverSlimer wrote:
On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 09:32:46 -0400, Big Al wrote:

On 06/21/2018 09:27 AM, SilverSlimer wrote:
On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 07:49:06 -0400, Keith Nuttle
wrote:

On 6/21/2018 7:15 AM, Big Al wrote:
On 06/21/2018 04:52 AM, GlowingBlueMist wrote:
Once again Microsoft has found a way to break the Classic Shell
program that many people use as a replacement for Microsoft's much
hated "Start" button at least on my two W10 Pro Insider machines.


The Classic Shell program worked just fine with Windows 10 Insider
version 17686.1003.* Unfortunately I have just completed upgrading two
machines running in virtual space on VMWare's Workstation to
17692.1000. **The Windows Insider versions of W10 were run on two
different AMD based computers with it making no difference.* On both
W10 Insider machines the Classic Shell program works just fine the
first time you try to use it but subsequent uses of the start button
act strange until after 3 attempts to use the "Start" button and it no
longer functions until you reboot the machine.


Perhaps someone else will take up the gauntlet and continue working
with the Classic Start menu program.

If not, all is not lost, there are at least 6 other programs that may
be able to take over the lead replacement start program.

Here is a link to an article by Ben Stegner discussing the subject
which also includes links to some of the possible replacements for
Classic Shell.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/window...u-alternative/


Unfortunately the author of the Classic Shell program has abandoned
the software and moved on to other things so unless someone else steps
in to adjust or fix that program it looks like Microsoft will finally
be able to stop people from using it.


Then again, who knows if the current problems Classic Shell has with
the latest Windows 10 Insider edition will continue to exist when they
actually release the next version or two to the public masses.

In windows 8.1 that menu was a real bummer till they at least allowed
you to boot to the desktop.* (I bought 8.0 on day one).*** I found
start8 to be very good and I hear now there is a start10.** I would vote
for that.

But I've now been using Win10's own start menu and find it isn't that
bad.* Sure it's nowhere near 7's but if you clean off the crap and
organize your stuff in nice groups and widen the menu so you can get
more icons, it's not bad, even usable.** I mean how many programs does
the average non-power user use?
I find I can access items in the native Windows 10 start, much faster
that I ever could in Older version of Windows start menus.

One of the best things about Windows 10 Start is the absence of the old
collapsing folder system. That was one of the hardest thing ever
developed by Microsoft. For deep folders I always took two or more
tries to get where I wanted to go.

I honestly have to wonder why so many people are so attached to
Windows 7 over 10. The start menu, as you say, is much better in 10
than it ever was and in terms of performance, there is little to no
difference between 7 and 10. The new anti-malware system is also quite
stellar, what with the controlled folders in particular. People need
to let go of the past and embrace the future.

I think the process of change is the issue. People in general, even me,
don't like change. I saw some previews of Win10 before it's release.
Buggy but still usable and I thought it was hell on wheels. I told
every one of my friends that they and I should never use it. Now I'm
quite satisfied that it works and have learned to use it with ease. Of
course there's the disclaimer he "I use linux for everyday use and
turn win 10 on about 3 hours a month."


What do you need Windows for, exactly?

Since Linux is able to read NTFS okay, it's not 100% foolproof IMHO.
1) When I do large re-arrangements of data on my 2nd HD, 1TB, I do it in
windows.
2) Also I run a robocopy script to mirror that 1TB to another 1TB for
backup.
3) Turbo Tax around Feb/Mar.
4) I still prefer Acronis Backup and I do it live rather than CD only
since it makes sequential labeled files and cleans up extras if run live.
5) Quicken.
6) I like following along with some articles on Windows 10 while in
Windows 10.

I could just put all this in my VM of Windows 10 Insider and that would
be it. But I'm not sure how sharing a drive in VM works since
basically it's mounted in Linux as /media/alan/DRIVE and then WIndows
reads it a D:\ through the VM. Seems like I'm still at the final end
still using Linux NTFS routines to write that data to the drive?

I could run acronis from my USB and that would take care of that. But
there is little reason not to just keep 10 around for the "what the heck".

  #27  
Old June 22nd 18, 02:41 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Ken Blake[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,789
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Fri, 22 Jun 2018 00:32:58 -0400, ...w¡ñ§±¤ñ
wrote:

Ken Blake wrote:

Why did Microsoft go from the Windows 7 interface to the 8.x/10
interface? I think because so many people use iPads, iPhones, Android
Phones and Tablets, Microsoft saw that as the futures, and they wanted
to be much closer to those.


MSFT has been thinking about tiles in the UI for two decades.

Just one example[1] - http://tinypic.com/r/28817x5/9



OK, but thinking about it and doing it are two different things. I
still think that what I said above is true.
  #28  
Old June 22nd 18, 02:50 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 466
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Fri, 22 Jun 2018 08:22:57 -0400, Big Al wrote:

[Am I the only one who is confused here as to why Classic Shell is needed?]

How did you get that cascade menu in operation. I've never seen this
and I'd go as far to say that others haven't either.


It's actually trivial to set up Windows 10 native cascade menus, which is
why I asked why anyone resorts to Classic Shell nowadays.

To answer your question, I already wrote an entire very complete
step-by-step detailed tutorial on exactly how to create the native Windows
10 Cascade Menu I showed in those screenshots.

That tutorial had lots of screenshots, so it would be a waste to re-state
what was already explicitly described (which took me *hours* to do for
you).

Here's the header information from that recent tutorial:
From: Arlen Holder
Newsgroups: alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows.8
Subject: Tutorial for setting up a well-organized consistent efficient Windows menu system
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:52:36 -0000 (UTC)
Organization: Mixmin
Message-ID:
Injection-Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:52:36 -0000 (UTC)
Injection-Info: news.mixmin.net; posting-host="280c6f9239ac0f306a8fd5043aa4dba15cc65d6b"; logging-data="17885"; "

For some reason, that tutorial shows up in my newsreader but not on the
tribal archives at http://tinyurl.com/alt-comp-os-windows-10

Do you see that tutorial in your newsreader?
Maybe something was wrong when I sent it?
(as I don't understand why it's not in the tribal archives)

I might resend it ... but can others look first?
(Addendum: I just ran a search on http://al.howardknight.net/ for that
message id and it shows up, so I'm not sure why it's not archived in the
tribal archives...)

http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?STYPE=msgid&A=0&MSGI=%3Cpfo1kd%24het%241 %40news.mixmin.net%3E
  #29  
Old June 22nd 18, 03:05 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
SilverSlimer
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Fri, 22 Jun 2018 08:35:42 -0400, Big Al wrote:

On 06/21/2018 09:37 PM, SilverSlimer wrote:
On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 09:32:46 -0400, Big Al wrote:

On 06/21/2018 09:27 AM, SilverSlimer wrote:
On Thu, 21 Jun 2018 07:49:06 -0400, Keith Nuttle
wrote:

On 6/21/2018 7:15 AM, Big Al wrote:
On 06/21/2018 04:52 AM, GlowingBlueMist wrote:
Once again Microsoft has found a way to break the Classic Shell
program that many people use as a replacement for Microsoft's much
hated "Start" button at least on my two W10 Pro Insider machines.


The Classic Shell program worked just fine with Windows 10 Insider
version 17686.1003.* Unfortunately I have just completed upgrading two
machines running in virtual space on VMWare's Workstation to
17692.1000. **The Windows Insider versions of W10 were run on two
different AMD based computers with it making no difference.* On both
W10 Insider machines the Classic Shell program works just fine the
first time you try to use it but subsequent uses of the start button
act strange until after 3 attempts to use the "Start" button and it no
longer functions until you reboot the machine.


Perhaps someone else will take up the gauntlet and continue working
with the Classic Start menu program.

If not, all is not lost, there are at least 6 other programs that may
be able to take over the lead replacement start program.

Here is a link to an article by Ben Stegner discussing the subject
which also includes links to some of the possible replacements for
Classic Shell.

https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/window...u-alternative/


Unfortunately the author of the Classic Shell program has abandoned
the software and moved on to other things so unless someone else steps
in to adjust or fix that program it looks like Microsoft will finally
be able to stop people from using it.


Then again, who knows if the current problems Classic Shell has with
the latest Windows 10 Insider edition will continue to exist when they
actually release the next version or two to the public masses.

In windows 8.1 that menu was a real bummer till they at least allowed
you to boot to the desktop.* (I bought 8.0 on day one).*** I found
start8 to be very good and I hear now there is a start10.** I would vote
for that.

But I've now been using Win10's own start menu and find it isn't that
bad.* Sure it's nowhere near 7's but if you clean off the crap and
organize your stuff in nice groups and widen the menu so you can get
more icons, it's not bad, even usable.** I mean how many programs does
the average non-power user use?
I find I can access items in the native Windows 10 start, much faster
that I ever could in Older version of Windows start menus.

One of the best things about Windows 10 Start is the absence of the old
collapsing folder system. That was one of the hardest thing ever
developed by Microsoft. For deep folders I always took two or more
tries to get where I wanted to go.

I honestly have to wonder why so many people are so attached to
Windows 7 over 10. The start menu, as you say, is much better in 10
than it ever was and in terms of performance, there is little to no
difference between 7 and 10. The new anti-malware system is also quite
stellar, what with the controlled folders in particular. People need
to let go of the past and embrace the future.

I think the process of change is the issue. People in general, even me,
don't like change. I saw some previews of Win10 before it's release.
Buggy but still usable and I thought it was hell on wheels. I told
every one of my friends that they and I should never use it. Now I'm
quite satisfied that it works and have learned to use it with ease. Of
course there's the disclaimer he "I use linux for everyday use and
turn win 10 on about 3 hours a month."


What do you need Windows for, exactly?

Since Linux is able to read NTFS okay, it's not 100% foolproof IMHO.
1) When I do large re-arrangements of data on my 2nd HD, 1TB, I do it in
windows.
2) Also I run a robocopy script to mirror that 1TB to another 1TB for
backup.
3) Turbo Tax around Feb/Mar.
4) I still prefer Acronis Backup and I do it live rather than CD only
since it makes sequential labeled files and cleans up extras if run live.
5) Quicken.
6) I like following along with some articles on Windows 10 while in
Windows 10.

I could just put all this in my VM of Windows 10 Insider and that would
be it. But I'm not sure how sharing a drive in VM works since
basically it's mounted in Linux as /media/alan/DRIVE and then WIndows
reads it a D:\ through the VM. Seems like I'm still at the final end
still using Linux NTFS routines to write that data to the drive?

I could run acronis from my USB and that would take care of that. But
there is little reason not to just keep 10 around for the "what the heck".


So what you're saying is that you'd be rid of Windows if Microsoft
maintained a proper NTFS driver in Linux and some third-parties
developed their software for Linux as well. That's a very comfortable
position to be in.
  #30  
Old June 22nd 18, 06:46 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,512
Default Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview version 17692.1000 Breaks Classic Shell

On Fri, 22 Jun 2018 13:50:56 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
wrote:

On Fri, 22 Jun 2018 08:22:57 -0400, Big Al wrote:

[Am I the only one who is confused here as to why Classic Shell is needed?]

How did you get that cascade menu in operation. I've never seen this
and I'd go as far to say that others haven't either.


It's actually trivial to set up Windows 10 native cascade menus, which is
why I asked why anyone resorts to Classic Shell nowadays.

To answer your question, I already wrote an entire very complete
step-by-step detailed tutorial on exactly how to create the native Windows
10 Cascade Menu I showed in those screenshots.

That tutorial had lots of screenshots, so it would be a waste to re-state
what was already explicitly described (which took me *hours* to do for
you).

Here's the header information from that recent tutorial:
From: Arlen Holder
Newsgroups: alt.comp.os.windows-10,alt.comp.os.windows.8
Subject: Tutorial for setting up a well-organized consistent efficient Windows menu system
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:52:36 -0000 (UTC)
Organization: Mixmin
Message-ID:
Injection-Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2018 08:52:36 -0000 (UTC)
Injection-Info: news.mixmin.net; posting-host="280c6f9239ac0f306a8fd5043aa4dba15cc65d6b"; logging-data="17885"; "

For some reason, that tutorial shows up in my newsreader but not on the
tribal archives at http://tinyurl.com/alt-comp-os-windows-10


That link resolves to a URI at www.pcbanter.net, a website that scrapes
Usenet content and presents it as its own. You already know that.

Surely, that isn't what you're referring to as a "tribal archive"?

On a more serious note, if there's a "tribal archive" for Windows
topics, I haven't seen it. Maybe someone should start one so you'll have
a place to store your work products all in one place.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off






All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 PCbanter.
The comments are property of their posters.