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What else do you do when setting up a new Win10 desktop from scratch?



 
 
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  #31  
Old June 25th 18, 10:22 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Ant[_2_]
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Posts: 536
Default What else do you do when setting up a new Win10 desktop from scratch?

Paul wrote:
Ant wrote:
Paul wrote:


The modern BSOD screen isn't all that useful.


I really don't like the friendly OSes' screens these days. I still like
seeing those technical stuff. I wished they would give options to keep
those on.


The absolute worst cases happen in Windows 10,
when there is a BSOD, and the screen remains
completely black. No smiley face, no nothing.


Those are hard to debug.


That happened in all OSes including Linux when my display is asleep for
those very hard lock ups. No logs, etc. Maybe blinking keyboard lights
if you're lucky to say kernel panics! It would be nice if other OSes
could do that too like Windows.


I was only seeing those during the Win10 preview.


The old BSOD screen (WinXP era) was "more reliable"
and wasn't relying on the sanity of the desktop to work.
You could still have video card crashes without
a lot of details to work with. At least the
display tries to do restarts or recovery now.


Eh, I never liked those autorestart features. I want to see why they
crashed.

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  #32  
Old June 26th 18, 03:45 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
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Posts: 690
Default What else do you do when setting up a new Win10 desktop fromscratch?

Paul wrote:
The absolute worst cases happen in Windows 10,
when there is a BSOD, and the screen remains
completely black. No smiley face, no nothing.


Because that is when you are supposed to use the debugging-hammer...
;-)

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  #33  
Old June 26th 18, 03:50 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
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Default What else do you do when setting up a new Win10 desktop fromscratch?

Ant wrote:
That happened in all OSes including Linux when my display is asleep for
those very hard lock ups. No logs, etc. Maybe blinking keyboard lights
if you're lucky to say kernel panics! It would be nice if other OSes
could do that too like Windows.


Linux should try ALT+F1-6 virtual console first to fix, ore restart
gracefully. If that fails, the ol' REISUB. You have options before
hitting the power button with Linux. If the above fails I'd start
considering a hardware issue.

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Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
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http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
  #34  
Old June 26th 18, 04:22 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 7,316
Default What else do you do when setting up a new Win10 desktop fromscratch?

Jonathan N. Little wrote:
Ant wrote:
That happened in all OSes including Linux when my display is asleep for
those very hard lock ups. No logs, etc. Maybe blinking keyboard lights
if you're lucky to say kernel panics! It would be nice if other OSes
could do that too like Windows.


Linux should try ALT+F1-6 virtual console first to fix, ore restart
gracefully. If that fails, the ol' REISUB. You have options before
hitting the power button with Linux. If the above fails I'd start
considering a hardware issue.


But if you saw the keyboard LEDs flashing, you probably
wouldn't be all that optimistic about recovery.

I've seen that maybe once or twice, and it doesn't happen
very often.

I think in all the time we used Solaris, we saw just one kernel
panic, and it was a simulation job using all 4GB of memory
on the machine (a machine tricked out with that much RAM
at the time). For most non-heroic situations, never a problem.

My WinXP machine has "bounced off the walls", but...
that was bad RAM.

Paul
  #35  
Old June 26th 18, 06:51 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Arlen Holder
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Posts: 466
Default What else do you do when setting up a new Win10 desktop from scratch?

On Sun, 24 Jun 2018 09:07:43 -0500, Char Jackson wrote:
No, that's different.


Thanks for suggesting folks who set up Windows 10 consider these two
different tasks:
a. Prevent reboot upon update, versus,
b. Prevent reboot upon system crash.

If you go to System Properties, select the Advanced tab, there will be 3
sections there. The third section is titled "Startup and Recovery", with
a Settings button. Click Settings, then on the next screen find the
"System failure" section. The second option there should be
"Automatically restart", and it's checked by default.


Got it. Just did it. Here are the two distinct disabling reboot sequences
for the tribal knowledge record.
================================================== ==========================
To disable autostart after updates:

1. Open the control panel as admin:
RMB-Start Windows PowerShell (Admin)
2. Then run the control panel applet from that admin command line
C:\Windows\System32\control.exe
3. Bring up the task scheduler from within the Control Panel:
CP: System and Security Administrative Tools Task Scheduler
4. Open the "Update Orchestrator inside the task scheduler library:
Task Scheduler Library Microsoft Windows UpdateOrchestrator
5. Disable reboot after updates:
Right click on the task named "Reboot" & click "Disable" to disable it.
================================================== ==========================
To disable autostart after crashes:

1. Pop up the Control Panel again:
RMB-Start Run control.exe
2. Open the "System Properties" "Advanced" tab
System and Security System Advanced System Settings
3. Bring up Startup & Recovery settings:
Startup and Recovery Settings
4. Uncheck the system failure automatically restart option:
System failure
[x]Write an event to the system log
[x]Automically restart
OK OK
================================================== ==========================

Should *you* disable that option? I don't know. I'm just saying it's
something that I do because if there's a crash, I want it to be in my
face so that I can track down the cause and fix it.


I've created the sequence for both in the same file since they're similar.
040_disable_automatic_restart_after_update_and_cra sh.txt

Thanks.
 




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