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WinXP laptop temp question



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 13th 18, 11:19 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Bill in Co
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Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

Just a general question about laptops. Is it ok for some laptops to have a
port connector (for example) get so hot it's uncomfortable to touch? I have
a Dell 830, 2.4 GHz model, where the back Ethernet jack is too hot to leave
your finger on for any length of time.

The other reported temps by CPUID are good I think (under 40 C), the hottest
recorded temp being the NVIDIA NVS 140M video, at 54C. And surprisingly,
the laptop fan is pretty quiet. I've just never expected this, but have
limited experience with computer temps. TIA.


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  #2  
Old August 13th 18, 11:48 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 7,078
Default WinXP laptop temp question

Bill in Co wrote:
Just a general question about laptops. Is it ok for some laptops to have a
port connector (for example) get so hot it's uncomfortable to touch? I have
a Dell 830, 2.4 GHz model, where the back Ethernet jack is too hot to leave
your finger on for any length of time.

The other reported temps by CPUID are good I think (under 40 C), the hottest
recorded temp being the NVIDIA NVS 140M video, at 54C. And surprisingly,
the laptop fan is pretty quiet. I've just never expected this, but have
limited experience with computer temps. TIA.


An Ethernet jack should not get warm.

The temperature you describe, is around 65C, give or take.

Is the laptop battery life shorter than normal ?

Or does the Ethernet connector only get hot
while the laptop is charging ?

Paul
  #3  
Old August 14th 18, 12:04 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,970
Default WinXP laptop temp question

In message , Bill in Co
writes:
Just a general question about laptops.

(So I've added the W7 'group.)
Is it ok for some laptops to have a
port connector (for example) get so hot it's uncomfortable to touch? I have
a Dell 830, 2.4 GHz model, where the back Ethernet jack is too hot to leave
your finger on for any length of time.


Can you measure it with some sort of thermometer?

The other reported temps by CPUID are good I think (under 40 C), the hottest
recorded temp being the NVIDIA NVS 140M video, at 54C. And surprisingly,
the laptop fan is pretty quiet. I've just never expected this, but have
limited experience with computer temps. TIA.


It's _probably_ OK, but I'd be concerned too. In a similar condition
(the part of the case to the left of the tab key a bit hot to the touch
on my Toshiba Portégé), I obtained one of the vacuum fans that goes on
the side vent and sucks (better than the trays that blow from below,
IMO), but then I'm a bit paranoid as my last machine died from
overheating. Worth making sure the vents aren't clogged - both inputs
(usually underneath) and outputs (usually side, probably near your hot
port connector). If you do decide to add a fan tray, two things:
firstly, find where the hot spot in your laptop is, and - especially if
it's a tray with only one fan in it - make sure it's in the right place
(note: it _won't_ be in the middle); and secondly, don't get one with no
bottom cover or one with _large_ vents. Why? Because you can't put it on
your knee (lap) - the fan stops when it presses on your knee! The
side-sucking fans, though I think more effective, make the laptop shape
more unwieldy. (And getting the rubbery "lips" that come with them to
fit properly over the vents is fiddly.) I have the TecBean one with a
temperature readout (currently showing 32).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

For this star a "night on the tiles" means winning at Scrabble - Kathy Lette
(on Kylie), RT 2014/1/11-17
  #4  
Old August 14th 18, 12:11 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,970
Default WinXP laptop temp question

In message , Paul
writes:
Bill in Co wrote:
Just a general question about laptops. Is it ok for some laptops to
have a port connector (for example) get so hot it's uncomfortable to
touch? I have a Dell 830, 2.4 GHz model, where the back Ethernet
jack is too hot to leave your finger on for any length of time.
The other reported temps by CPUID are good I think (under 40 C), the
hottest recorded temp being the NVIDIA NVS 140M video, at 54C. And
surprisingly, the laptop fan is pretty quiet. I've just never
expected this, but have limited experience with computer temps. TIA.


An Ethernet jack should not get warm.


Agreed. I was assuming it was just that the port was near the part of
the motherboard that is running hot (probably CPU, possibly GPU).

The temperature you describe, is around 65C, give or take.

Is the laptop battery life shorter than normal ?

Or does the Ethernet connector only get hot
while the laptop is charging ?

Paul


Ah, I see where you're going; either impending-failing battery (check by
running the laptop for a while with the battery removed - does it get
warm?), or poor connection at the power socket (these can get _very_ hot
before they fail altogether) (check by running on the battery for a bit
- does it get warm?).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

For this star a "night on the tiles" means winning at Scrabble - Kathy Lette
(on Kylie), RT 2014/1/11-17
  #5  
Old August 14th 18, 01:00 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

Paul wrote:
Bill in Co wrote:
Just a general question about laptops. Is it ok for some laptops to
have a port connector (for example) get so hot it's uncomfortable to
touch? I have a Dell 830, 2.4 GHz model, where the back Ethernet jack
is too hot to leave your finger on for any length of time.

The other reported temps by CPUID are good I think (under 40 C), the
hottest recorded temp being the NVIDIA NVS 140M video, at 54C. And
surprisingly, the laptop fan is pretty quiet. I've just never expected
this, but have limited experience with computer temps. TIA.


An Ethernet jack should not get warm.

The temperature you describe, is around 65C, give or take.

Is the laptop battery life shorter than normal ?

Or does the Ethernet connector only get hot
while the laptop is charging ?

Paul


Well, like John was saying, I think it's hot because its near some metallic
part of the motherboard that runs a bit hot, and since it's metal, it's just
conducting heat from that point (and the neighboring port is also pretty
warm). But the whole lower right hand side corner of the laptop is pretty
warm. (I don't think the battery life is poor, but I haven't checked it,
and these ports or jacks happen to be on the right hand corner of the
laptop).

65C is when you can't hold your finger on it for very long (meaning like
5-10 seconds)? I was thinking it would be a lot less than that.


  #6  
Old August 14th 18, 01:48 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Paul
writes:
Bill in Co wrote:
Just a general question about laptops. Is it ok for some laptops to
have a port connector (for example) get so hot it's uncomfortable to
touch? I have a Dell 830, 2.4 GHz model, where the back Ethernet
jack is too hot to leave your finger on for any length of time.
The other reported temps by CPUID are good I think (under 40 C), the
hottest recorded temp being the NVIDIA NVS 140M video, at 54C. And
surprisingly, the laptop fan is pretty quiet. I've just never
expected this, but have limited experience with computer temps. TIA.


An Ethernet jack should not get warm.


Agreed. I was assuming it was just that the port was near the part of
the motherboard that is running hot (probably CPU, possibly GPU).

The temperature you describe, is around 65C, give or take.

Is the laptop battery life shorter than normal ?

Or does the Ethernet connector only get hot
while the laptop is charging ?

Paul


Ah, I see where you're going; either impending-failing battery (check by
running the laptop for a while with the battery removed - does it get
warm?), or poor connection at the power socket (these can get _very_ hot
before they fail altogether) (check by running on the battery for a bit
- does it get warm?).
--


I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not, this
is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days ago (which
is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never able to
resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls, etc). That
double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware level, which I still
find hard to believe.


  #7  
Old August 14th 18, 02:06 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,970
Default WinXP laptop temp question

In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not, this
is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days ago (which
is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never able to
resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls, etc). That
double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware level, which I still
find hard to believe.

The obvious question: was the hotspot in evidence before the USB port
failed? If so, it seems not inconceivable that it could be related: the
heat fried a chip, or (though I think this would require _great_ heat)
desoldered something. Or could have just been the final factor that
would separate a minuscule crack that had developed, or something.

Can you get a thermometer into the port? (Maybe a meat/oven one? Though
don't short anything.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Tact is the ability to describe others as they see themselves. -Abraham
Lincoln, 16th president of the U.S (1809-1865)
  #8  
Old August 14th 18, 02:38 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not,
this is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days
ago (which is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never
able to resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls,
etc). That double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware
level, which I still find hard to believe.

The obvious question: was the hotspot in evidence before the USB port
failed? If so, it seems not inconceivable that it could be related: the
heat fried a chip, or (though I think this would require _great_ heat)
desoldered something. Or could have just been the final factor that
would separate a minuscule crack that had developed, or something.

Can you get a thermometer into the port? (Maybe a meat/oven one? Though
don't short anything.)


I don't know whether it was hot before, or that could have answered it. :-)
I don't have such a thermometer, but I can tell you this much: if you leave
your finger inside that metal port for about 5-10 seconds, you will need to
pull it out. :-) Paul seemed to be suggesting that might be around 65C.
I just looked this up on the Internet, and according to one article, it says
60C (for up to 5 seconds). I'm not sure if anything inside the laptop is
supposed to run that hot, but maybe it could (it does have a NVIDIA graphics
chip, afterall). Oh, and I did check it out with the battery removed, but
got the same result.


  #9  
Old August 14th 18, 02:45 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,078
Default WinXP laptop temp question

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not,
this
is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days ago
(which
is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never able to
resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls, etc). That
double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware level, which I
still
find hard to believe.

The obvious question: was the hotspot in evidence before the USB port
failed? If so, it seems not inconceivable that it could be related: the
heat fried a chip, or (though I think this would require _great_ heat)
desoldered something. Or could have just been the final factor that
would separate a minuscule crack that had developed, or something.

Can you get a thermometer into the port? (Maybe a meat/oven one? Though
don't short anything.)


Do you need a thermometer though, if the owner knows how hot
it ran new, and it's running a lot hotter now ?

If some circuitry in the same area melted, you'd want to
have a look inside, to see if the thing could be saved.

There are sites that have take-apart guides for a few laptops.
You can't always find the exact model you want though.

https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Dell+La...lacement/29140

Paul

  #10  
Old August 14th 18, 02:53 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

Paul wrote:
J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not,
this
is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days ago
(which
is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never able to
resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls, etc). That
double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware level, which I
still
find hard to believe.

The obvious question: was the hotspot in evidence before the USB port
failed? If so, it seems not inconceivable that it could be related: the
heat fried a chip, or (though I think this would require _great_ heat)
desoldered something. Or could have just been the final factor that
would separate a minuscule crack that had developed, or something.

Can you get a thermometer into the port? (Maybe a meat/oven one? Though
don't short anything.)


Do you need a thermometer though, if the owner knows how hot
it ran new, and it's running a lot hotter now ?

If some circuitry in the same area melted, you'd want to
have a look inside, to see if the thing could be saved.

There are sites that have take-apart guides for a few laptops.
You can't always find the exact model you want though.

https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Dell+La...lacement/29140

Paul


I don't know if it's running a lot hotter now, so that's an unknown. As for
tearing it apart, I'm not sure it's going to do much, as I figure if there
were hardware damage, it's more likely to be internal (at the IC level).
But thanks for that reference, which looks good!


  #11  
Old August 14th 18, 03:56 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Bob_S[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 17
Default WinXP laptop temp question

"Bill in Co" wrote in message
...

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not,
this is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days
ago (which is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never
able to resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls,
etc). That double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware
level, which I still find hard to believe.

The obvious question: was the hotspot in evidence before the USB port
failed? If so, it seems not inconceivable that it could be related: the
heat fried a chip, or (though I think this would require _great_ heat)
desoldered something. Or could have just been the final factor that
would separate a minuscule crack that had developed, or something.

Can you get a thermometer into the port? (Maybe a meat/oven one? Though
don't short anything.)


I don't know whether it was hot before, or that could have answered it. :-)
I don't have such a thermometer, but I can tell you this much: if you leave
your finger inside that metal port for about 5-10 seconds, you will need to
pull it out. :-) Paul seemed to be suggesting that might be around 65C. I
just looked this up on the Internet, and according to one article, it says
60C (for up to 5 seconds). I'm not sure if anything inside the laptop is
supposed to run that hot, but maybe it could (it does have a NVIDIA
graphics chip, afterall). Oh, and I did check it out with the battery
removed, but got the same result.


Bill, I've repaired a number of Dell laptops and one thing I've found is
that if the USB port is on the right rear corner and the port feels loose
it's most likely the solder connection that hold the port connector to the
daughter board has broken loose. The reason it's feeling hot is probably
because that port connector is also the heat sink for the nearby power
regulator for the daughter board the USB port is installed on.

Look up the model number and see if you can find a visual that shows a photo
of the board. The big tell is that the port connector itself will feel
loose compared to the others and if it's located on a daughter board in the
right rear corner then that is probably the reason.

Just a guess.
--


Bob S.

  #12  
Old August 14th 18, 04:38 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

Bob_S wrote:
"Bill in Co" wrote in message
...

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I may try that next, but I'm not expecting much. Coincentally or not,
this is the same laptop that I lost the double USB port in a few days
ago (which is located in the same area as the hot spot), and was never
able to resurrect (via any device manager uninstalls and reinstalls,
etc). That double USB port was apparently damaged at the hardware
level, which I still find hard to believe.

The obvious question: was the hotspot in evidence before the USB port
failed? If so, it seems not inconceivable that it could be related: the
heat fried a chip, or (though I think this would require _great_ heat)
desoldered something. Or could have just been the final factor that
would separate a minuscule crack that had developed, or something.

Can you get a thermometer into the port? (Maybe a meat/oven one? Though
don't short anything.)


I don't know whether it was hot before, or that could have answered it.
:-) I don't have such a thermometer, but I can tell you this much: if
you leave your finger inside that metal port for about 5-10 seconds, you
will need to pull it out. :-) Paul seemed to be suggesting that might
be around 65C. I just looked this up on the Internet, and according to
one article, it says 60C (for up to 5 seconds). I'm not sure if
anything inside the laptop is supposed to run that hot, but maybe it
could (it does have a NVIDIA graphics chip, afterall). Oh, and I did
check it out with the battery removed, but got the same result.


Bill, I've repaired a number of Dell laptops and one thing I've found is
that if the USB port is on the right rear corner and the port feels loose
it's most likely the solder connection that hold the port connector to the
daughter board has broken loose. The reason it's feeling hot is probably
because that port connector is also the heat sink for the nearby power
regulator for the daughter board the USB port is installed on.

Look up the model number and see if you can find a visual that shows a
photo of the board. The big tell is that the port connector itself will
feel loose compared to the others and if it's located on a daughter board
in the right rear corner then that is probably the reason.

Just a guess.
--


Bob S.


Thanks for the suggestion, but it feels pretty tight, like the other
connectors.

Since I bought this on eBay for about $100, I might just wait and see if I
can find another one that isn't too expensive to simply replace it. Either
that, or just live with my other laptop experiment, which is a Dell Latitude
E6500, which seems to be a much nicer and more elegant laptop, anyways. :-)


  #13  
Old August 14th 18, 07:28 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,970
Default WinXP laptop temp question

In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I don't know whether it was hot before, or that could have answered it. :-)
I don't have such a thermometer, but I can tell you this much: if you leave
your finger inside that metal port for about 5-10 seconds, you will need to
pull it out. :-) Paul seemed to be suggesting that might be around 65C.
I just looked this up on the Internet, and according to one article, it says
60C (for up to 5 seconds). I'm not sure if anything inside the laptop is
supposed to run that hot, but maybe it could (it does have a NVIDIA graphics
chip, afterall). Oh, and I did check it out with the battery removed, but
got the same result.

That obviously eliminates a faulty battery as the source of the heat,
and probably also the charging circuit. Running it _on_ the battery for
a while would eliminate a poor connection at the power socket (if it
still gets warm), but usually you'd know about that as those get _very_
hot, and you'd usually smell hot plastic, and (assuming you have the
usual power settings) the screen brightness may vary. (If you sniff
around the hot port, _do_ you smell anything amiss?)

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

History is not the past. It is the method we have evolved of organising our
ignorance of the past. - Hilary Mantel, first Reith Lecture 2017
  #14  
Old August 14th 18, 07:07 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:
In message , Bill in Co
writes:
[]
I don't know whether it was hot before, or that could have answered it.
:-) I don't have such a thermometer, but I can tell you this much: if
you leave your finger inside that metal port for about 5-10 seconds, you
will need to pull it out. :-) Paul seemed to be suggesting that might
be around 65C. I just looked this up on the Internet, and according to
one article, it
says 60C (for up to 5 seconds). I'm not sure if anything inside the
laptop is supposed to run that hot, but maybe it could (it does have a
NVIDIA graphics chip, afterall). Oh, and I did check it out with the
battery removed, but got the same result.

That obviously eliminates a faulty battery as the source of the heat,
and probably also the charging circuit. Running it _on_ the battery for
a while would eliminate a poor connection at the power socket (if it
still gets warm), but usually you'd know about that as those get _very_
hot, and you'd usually smell hot plastic, and (assuming you have the
usual power settings) the screen brightness may vary. (If you sniff
around the hot port, _do_ you smell anything amiss?)

--


No, nothing amiss. And again I don't know if this was related to the other
problem, either, but since I've got another laptop to mess around with, will
probably just let it go.


  #15  
Old August 16th 18, 10:31 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general
Bill in Co
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,882
Default WinXP laptop temp question

I've got one other question on this (somewhat hot) laptop issue, which I'm
still trying to investigate. If one turns off all extraneous devices in
BIOS, does that in any way impact the total power consumption (and thus
heat) at the hardware level? I'm just wondering if disabling all the
devices not being used in BIOS (and perhaps windows), such as Bluetooth,
Serial and Parallel Ports, PC card ports, docking tray, etc, will literally
(at the hardware level) turn OFF some IC chips, and thus reduce the overall
temps and power consumption.


 




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