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Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10



 
 
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  #226  
Old March 16th 19, 05:01 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,832
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Mike Easter wrote:
Paul wrote:
There are kooky websites.

http://www.lessemf.com/personal.html

Nothing will get you, if you wear this stuff.

https://lessemf.com/images/a279-1.jpg


That site naturally has a page for arousing concern:
http://www.lessemf.com/emf-news.html

... with a specific section for health effects with gobs of citations.

I wondered what the wp article would say. Since it didn't even get into
controversy about EMF in the main article, I tho't maybe that would come
up in the Talk section. There wasn't even much there except one
contributor gave citations to read at WHO, CDC, NIH, and FCC/EPA.

His commentary was also useful, "The section should be re-formatted as
an explanation of the public concern and reasons, versus the wealth of
scientific research on the topic, indicating that precautionary
guidelines have been issued based on public concerns, not on evidence
that there is any evidence suggesting a real health concern. - It should
also have an explanation of the nocebo effect's effect on the research."

... where nocebo is defined as: A nocebo effect is said to occur when
negative expectations of the patient regarding a treatment cause the
treatment to have a more negative effect than it otherwise would have.

s/treatment/emf exposure/

That is, the same people who are shopping at lessemf are possibly
suffering the ill-effects of their concern about emf, NOT emf.


Wait until those people find out about the
5G deployment plans. And Musks array of satellites in LEO.
They're going to freak :-) And all so we can have more
fluffy cat photos.

Paul

Ads
  #227  
Old March 16th 19, 03:48 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
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Posts: 773
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Paul wrote:

Wait until those people find out about the 5G deployment plans. And
Musks array of satellites in LEO. They're going to freak :-) And all
so we can have more fluffy cat photos.


This will be their only salvation:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61-1UxTYHVL._SL1494_.jpg



--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
  #228  
Old March 16th 19, 07:01 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mike Easter
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Posts: 789
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Wolf K wrote:
Mike Easter wrote:
Paul wrote:
There are kooky websites.



That is, the same people who are shopping at lessemf are possibly
suffering the ill-effects of their concern about emf, NOT emf.


Bottom line: Everyone who posts here has been exposed to EMF all their
lives long. If it's that bad, we should all have joined the worms long
before cellphones etc contributed to the radiation load.

I believe that the subject, "is there any risk whatsoever from EMF? --
If so, what, if anything, should be done to mitigate that risk?" is a
very complicated subject.

In terms of 'public perception', apparently the concerns got legs some
time back with the rumors about the risks of cell phone usage emf exposure.

As a result of that concern, various 'bureaucracies' got involved with
their commentary, some of which was based on the concept of an
(over)abundance of caution, which is a common misguided malady.

There is plenty of emf around. No doubt that under extreme
circumstances, one should do some mitigating, depending on a proper
analysis of what/ how much/ is going on and what 'entity' is potentially
being affected and how.

The issue is NOT completely negligible, but clearly there is a
significant degree of over-reaction.

--
Mike Easter
  #229  
Old March 16th 19, 08:09 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mike Easter
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Posts: 789
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Wolf K wrote:
They leave out most of the most wide-spread sources, e.g. the house
wiring and fluorescent lights. Also any battery operated moving toys. In
fact, anything with an electric motor in it. Or any gas powered engine
that uses an electric spark to trigger combustion of the fuel. Or....

Yabbut... your examples are somewhat 'trivial' sources compared to some
others to think about.

AndĀ* they leave out the EMF source closest to home, the human body
itself. We capture those EMFs in ECGs and EEGs and use them for diagnosis.


We have to work at making use of those tiny electro-potentials.

It's significant that it's always the most recent technologies that
trigger these fears of invisible perils. We're programmed to be
suspicious of the unfamiliar: better run away from an unknown animal
than stick around and become its dinner.....


Speaking of dinner; your microwave oven has such a powerful source of
emf that we need to be shielded from its damage, by law/regulation.

And, maybe if I were a pregnant female train engineer sitting near the
generator for an diesel-electric locomotive, I might want to use one of
those measuring devices to see what my exposure was like.


--
Mike Easter
  #230  
Old March 16th 19, 10:34 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 8,832
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Wolf K wrote:
On 2019-03-15 22:35, Mike Easter wrote:
Paul wrote:
There are kooky websites.

http://www.lessemf.com/personal.html

Nothing will get you, if you wear this stuff.

https://lessemf.com/images/a279-1.jpg


That site naturally has a page for arousing concern:
http://www.lessemf.com/emf-news.html

... with a specific section for health effects with gobs of citations.

[...]

They leave out most of the most wide-spread sources, e.g. the house
wiring and fluorescent lights. Also any battery operated moving toys. In
fact, anything with an electric motor in it. Or any gas powered engine
that uses an electric spark to trigger combustion of the fuel. Or....

And they leave out the EMF source closest to home, the human body
itself. We capture those EMFs in ECGs and EEGs and use them for diagnosis.

It's significant that it's always the most recent technologies that
trigger these fears of invisible perils. We're programmed to be
suspicious of the unfamiliar: better run away from an unknown animal
than stick around and become its dinner.....

Best,


For some value of scientific notation.

Some of the effects you describe, might be 10^-50 W.
Whereas your microwave oven is 10^3 W. And has
roughly the power of 250 cell phones peaking.
Thank goodness your microwave oven does not leak.

All these sources have to be put into some kind
of perspective. Proximity, inverse square law, dosage, and
so on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverse-square_law

Paul
  #231  
Old March 17th 19, 09:48 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

In article , Char Jackson
wrote:

Is this the number on the connection setup page?
Or is it the actual USABLE data transfer rate where it actually matters
40 feet away from the router and your neighbor's wifi is closer than yours?
Or in the apartment building with 10 other people trying to use the
channel?


It varies greatly depending on the environment and circumstances,
which is the point. Those figures are the maximum under favorable
clear-channel, single-user conditions. It goes downhill from there.


Unless you live at nospam's house. Over there, wireless apparently works
better than wired.


this is not about my house or anyone's house.

the numbers don't lie. 802.11ac is faster than wired gigabit, 802.11ax
more so.

switch to wired 10gb-e and things change, but few people have 10gb-e to
their computer.

https://www.rcrwireless.com/20180706...e/wi-fi/wi-fi-
roadmap-wigig-and-beyond-tag17-tag99
Right now the cutting-edge of Wi-Fi products are largely based on
so-called Wave 2 of the IEEE¹s 802.11ac standard. Wave 2, as compared
to Wave 1, can push speeds up to about 2.34 Gbps and offers
multi-user multiple-input, multiple-output (MU-MIMO). Below is a
table from Cisco that highlights the enhancements to Wave 2 as
compared to previous iterations of the 802.11 specification.

2.34 gbps is more than double that of wired gigabit.

real world speeds won't be that fast, but even at half, it's still
faster than gigabit.

and that's ac, not ax.
  #232  
Old March 17th 19, 09:48 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

In article , Jonathan N. Little
wrote:

It's silly to use wireless
if you don't have to.

As a Radio Design engineer before doing this stuff, I can
only say "well stated"

I wish you guys were around when I was arging this general topic with
nospam in re.photo.digital.


what you were arguing about was based on your very outdated 10 year old
802.11n 1x1 router, which can do about 70mb/s on a good day.

your mistake is assuming that because your setup is slow, all wifi is
slow. that is simply not true.

modern wifi equipment is substantially faster than what you have.

https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/imag...sus_rtac86u/as
us_rtac86u_5ghz_peak_dn.jpg


Put a wall or two between and I will challenge you to the speed verses
my cable to my 1G switch...


this is about maximum speed, not a contrived scenario, but regardless,
802.11ax through a wall, will still be faster than gigabit to the next
room, or skip the wifi and use gigabit lte or even faster 5g (when it's
deployed).

you'd also need to drill a hole in the wall or run cables along the
floor, which is not always an option, and if you're going to do that,
then for a fair comparison, there should be a wifi mesh unit in each
room.

Also for folks who live in more densely packed domiciles like apartment
buildings where SSIDs swarm like gnats...


that's not an issue for a properly configured wifi network.

and then there's the convenience of wireless.


Basically the only thing in the plus column.


which is a *huge* plus, something which you are ignoring.
  #233  
Old March 17th 19, 09:48 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

In article , Jonathan N. Little
wrote:


Well now. I have had to remove folks trying to network Quickbooks
with wireless and put them on wired. Anything data intensive, wireless
sucks.


nonsense. wifi works exceptionally well, regardless of data intensity.


In reality Quickbooks sucks on a network regardless wire/wireless,but
that is beside the point.


quickbooks sucks in many ways, but as you say, that's not the point.

A wired connection in real life gives you a
more consistent reliable signal period. A the frequency goes up to
increase bandwidth the shorter the range and the more susceptible the
wireless signal becomes. Just a fact.


wireless is *extremely* reliable, sometimes more reliable than wired.

ask comcast users how often their *wired* internet goes out. it's not
good. weekly glitches are common, if not expected, sometimes daily.

after a fibre cut last year, *cellular* was the fallback:
https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/20...across-the-us-
due-to-cut-fiber-cables/
(CNN Money) ‹ Comcast customers across the United States experienced
a massive internet, cable TV, and telephone outage on Friday.
....
Customers took to their cellphones and mobile devices to complain
vociferously on Twitter. Some reported difficulty getting through to
Comcast customer service. The company took to Twitter to provide
updates and urge customers not to call 911.

and that was actually the *second* outage that *month*:
https://www.digitaltrends.com/comput...fects-phones-a
n-internet/
The outage on*Friday, June 29, follows an outage from earlier this
month that took down Comcast Business Voice and VoiceEdge Select
services.

which one is best for a given situation depends on many factors and
blindly picking wired (or wireless) is foolish.

Now from a radio design engineers standpoint, wireless was
designed to be the last mile. Not a real mile, but
to places where wires can't reach. So you put an access point
as close as possible to the receiver.


obviously, except that those access points might also be wireless,
otherwise known as mesh.

they also might not be particularly close, such as with cellular
towers, which can be several miles away in rural areas.


Having really world experience with 5GHz wireless Internet can confirm
that my 5-12 mbps connection could suddenly drop to 0 to 100 kbsp randomly.


are you talking about wifi or a wireless isp?

5ghz is much too low for quality wireless internet, so it's not
surprising you had problems.

that doesn't mean *all* wireless is flawed.

most wisps use 30 ghz and higher, offering up to gigabit speeds,
without wires and with high reliability.

Being an extremely lucky rural US resident my rural electric coop
company decided to pull this area out of 3-world-status and also give a
Verizon the middle-finger-salute, (like they're building out any FIOS
now), and I have now had a FTTP connection for the last few days. There
is NO comparison for connection stability. Even when I had slow DSL the
connection was more stable than this wireless. The only advantage to
wireless is not have to route wires.


that is a significant advantage, especially when it doesn't impact
bandwidth.

BTW as part of the deal for deregulation 25 years ago the telcos
*promised* us a fiber-optic "Information Superhighway" in less than 10
years...


fibre is available in a lot of places, but with gigabit lte now and 5g
soon, along with gigabit wisps, there's little need for that anymore.
  #234  
Old March 17th 19, 10:45 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mike
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 173
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 3/17/2019 2:48 PM, nospam wrote:
In article , Jonathan N. Little
wrote:


Well now. I have had to remove folks trying to network Quickbooks
with wireless and put them on wired. Anything data intensive, wireless
sucks.

nonsense. wifi works exceptionally well, regardless of data intensity.


In reality Quickbooks sucks on a network regardless wire/wireless,but
that is beside the point.


quickbooks sucks in many ways, but as you say, that's not the point.

A wired connection in real life gives you a
more consistent reliable signal period. A the frequency goes up to
increase bandwidth the shorter the range and the more susceptible the
wireless signal becomes. Just a fact.


wireless is *extremely* reliable, sometimes more reliable than wired.

ask comcast users how often their *wired* internet goes out. it's not
good. weekly glitches are common, if not expected, sometimes daily.

after a fibre cut last year, *cellular* was the fallback:
https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/20...across-the-us-
due-to-cut-fiber-cables/
(CNN Money) ā€¹ Comcast customers across the United States experienced
a massive internet, cable TV, and telephone outage on Friday.
...
Customers took to their cellphones and mobile devices to complain
vociferously on Twitter. Some reported difficulty getting through to
Comcast customer service. The company took to Twitter to provide
updates and urge customers not to call 911.

and that was actually the *second* outage that *month*:
https://www.digitaltrends.com/comput...fects-phones-a
n-internet/
The outage onĀ*Friday, June 29, follows an outage from earlier this
month that took down Comcast Business Voice and VoiceEdge Select
services.

which one is best for a given situation depends on many factors and
blindly picking wired (or wireless) is foolish.

Now from a radio design engineers standpoint, wireless was
designed to be the last mile. Not a real mile, but
to places where wires can't reach. So you put an access point
as close as possible to the receiver.

obviously, except that those access points might also be wireless,
otherwise known as mesh.

they also might not be particularly close, such as with cellular
towers, which can be several miles away in rural areas.


Having really world experience with 5GHz wireless Internet can confirm
that my 5-12 mbps connection could suddenly drop to 0 to 100 kbsp randomly.


are you talking about wifi or a wireless isp?

5ghz is much too low for quality wireless internet, so it's not
surprising you had problems.

that doesn't mean *all* wireless is flawed.

most wisps use 30 ghz and higher, offering up to gigabit speeds,
without wires and with high reliability.

Being an extremely lucky rural US resident my rural electric coop
company decided to pull this area out of 3-world-status and also give a
Verizon the middle-finger-salute, (like they're building out any FIOS
now), and I have now had a FTTP connection for the last few days. There
is NO comparison for connection stability. Even when I had slow DSL the
connection was more stable than this wireless. The only advantage to
wireless is not have to route wires.


that is a significant advantage, especially when it doesn't impact
bandwidth.

BTW as part of the deal for deregulation 25 years ago the telcos
*promised* us a fiber-optic "Information Superhighway" in less than 10
years...


fibre is available in a lot of places, but with gigabit lte now and 5g
soon, along with gigabit wisps, there's little need for that anymore.

What's the cost relationship for hardware and service for the various
methods?
  #235  
Old March 18th 19, 01:13 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
notX
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 60
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 3/17/19 4:48 PM, nospam wrote:

[snip]

you'd also need to drill a hole in the wall or run cables along the
floor,


or ceiling, where it doesn't get in the way as much and you won't see as
much either*.

* - won't see s much, for those with the unrealistic sense of "ugly"
where "ugly" means useful.


[snip]
  #236  
Old March 18th 19, 03:09 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

In article , Mike
wrote:


BTW as part of the deal for deregulation 25 years ago the telcos
*promised* us a fiber-optic "Information Superhighway" in less than 10
years...


fibre is available in a lot of places, but with gigabit lte now and 5g
soon, along with gigabit wisps, there's little need for that anymore.

What's the cost relationship for hardware and service for the various
methods?


costs varies, but the point is that wireless is replacing wired because
of its numerous advantages, with little to no downside.

verizon offers wired gigabit fios for $80/mo, with 1 year of netflix
included, although that's a promotional rate for new customers. the
renewal rate is higher, and installation is also extra.
https://www.verizon.com/home/fios-gigabit-connection/

verizon is starting to deploy 5g wireless internet for $70/mo (or less
for verizon cellular customers), although only in a few cities as of
now, expanding as 5g is deployed:
https://www.verizonwireless.com/5g/home/
Just $70/mo First 3 months free. Existing Verizon customers get
service for just $50/mo
https://www.androidauthority.com/verizon-5g-916577/
Verizon launched its 5G-based home networking service in parts of
Houston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles and Sacramento on October 1.
....
According to Verizon, customers will see an average download speed of
300Mbps and a maximum download speed of 940Mbps with no data caps.
By comparison, you can get a Charter Spectrum wired*connection at
300Mbps for around the same price, but you¹ll never see the maximum
speed reported by Version. [sic]
....
Real-world testing shows the current download speeds can surpass
Verizon¹s advertised 300Mbps, hitting 600Mbps and 800Mbps. These
tests were conducted by Emil Olbrich, VP of networks at Signals
Research Group.

another wireless provider is webpass, offering up to gigabit speeds for
$60/mo, or ~45/mo paid yearly, currently in seven cities:
https://webpass.net/service_facts

yet another wireless provider is starry internet, also in its rollout
phase and in limited cities, with speeds as high as gigabit, although
due to capacity limitations, is currently offering 200 mbit for $50 and
will even pay early termination fees to switch, which is a compelling
incentive for anyone in their service area (which is expanding):

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6...fast-internet-
access-is-coming-to-your-home/
Starry says it has measured speeds from 300 megabits per second to
more than one gigabit per second at a range of between one and 1.5
kilometers‹even amid rain or snow.

https://support.starry.com/hc/en-us/...-I-want-to-swi
tch-to-Starry-but-I-would-have-to-pay-an-early-termination-fee-with-my-o
ld-internet-provider-Does-Starry-reimburse-early-termination-fees-
Starry Internet will issue you an account credit of up to $200 as
reimbursement for any early cancelation fees you may incur with
your previous internet service provider.

https://www.lightreading.com/service...starry-scores-
$100m-more-for-wireless-broadband/d/d-id/744476
Starry is expected to use the funds to fuel a plan to expand service
to another 16 cities over the next year, including New York,
Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Denver, Seattle, Detroit,
Atlanta, Indianapolis, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Miami and
Minneapolis, among others.

tl;dr wireless is *very* competitive with wired, and it's still in its
early stages.
  #237  
Old March 18th 19, 06:30 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,832
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

nospam wrote:


tl;dr wireless is *very* competitive with wired, and it's still in its
early stages.


https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/...c-single-fiber

"have smashed the world speed record for a fiber network,
pushing 255 terabits per second down a single strand of glass fiber."

I suspect it will be hard for wireless to keep up with that.

*******

And this network, plans to go optical from node to node (between satellites),
with the "wireless" portion going to rooftop mounted
pizza boxes with phased array beamforming.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starli..._constellation)

That's a complementary tech for 5G, that could enable the easy
setup of "microsites" for the more whizzy and unbelievable parts
of 5G. The believable parts of 5G will be more pedestrian.
About as believable as a declaration of "5Ge" by AT&T.

Paul
  #238  
Old March 18th 19, 02:15 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 773
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

nospam wrote:
In article , Jonathan N. Little
wrote:


snip

Having really world experience with 5GHz wireless Internet can confirm
that my 5-12 mbps connection could suddenly drop to 0 to 100 kbsp randomly.


are you talking about wifi or a wireless isp?


Wireless ISP. Fixed Wireless Internet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed_wireless

As per Wiki 4 basic frequencies: (900 MHz, 1.8 GHz, 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz).
I had the highest 5 Ghz. Must be line of sight and things like leaves
and rain can interfere.


5ghz is much too low for quality wireless internet, so it's not
surprising you had problems.

that doesn't mean *all* wireless is flawed.

most wisps use 30 ghz and higher, offering up to gigabit speeds,
without wires and with high reliability.


Higher the frequency the shorter the range and the less penetrating the
signal is. Yes, it can carries more data if it is not resending packets
due to interference. May not be an issue in Kansas but if you live in
any area with terrain...


Being an extremely lucky rural US resident my rural electric coop
company decided to pull this area out of 3-world-status and also give a
Verizon the middle-finger-salute, (like they're building out any FIOS
now), and I have now had a FTTP connection for the last few days. There
is NO comparison for connection stability. Even when I had slow DSL the
connection was more stable than this wireless. The only advantage to
wireless is not have to route wires.


that is a significant advantage, especially when it doesn't impact
bandwidth.


I'll take the "inconvenience" of the reliability and quality of signal
over what I had with wireless. Even the DSL, although slower, had less
variance. And with fiber impervious to solar flares, weather, EMP. And
were are not even venturing into security. Hard to snoop if it requires
a physical connection.


BTW as part of the deal for deregulation 25 years ago the telcos
*promised* us a fiber-optic "Information Superhighway" in less than 10
years...


fibre is available in a lot of places, but with gigabit lte now and 5g
soon, along with gigabit wisps, there's little need for that anymore.


BS. Verizon, the biggest player in the bunch, has been marketing up the
ying-yang but has not built out any more fiber in over a decade. Verizon
here was trying desperately to kill copper and drive folks from DSL.
Jacking up the price and lowering the speeds... They want to move over
everyone for regulated copper to unregulated wireless where the big
bucks are. Then all the fantasy over 5G cell service, cannot get a
reliable voice service around here. Where 4G LTE requires towers a few
miles apart how likely are rural folks going to get 5G where antennas
must be *feet* apart? Not going to happen here, and rural here in VA is
not like rural in flyover-country.

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
  #239  
Old March 18th 19, 02:52 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 773
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

nospam wrote:
In article , Mike
wrote:


BTW as part of the deal for deregulation 25 years ago the telcos
*promised* us a fiber-optic "Information Superhighway" in less than 10
years...

fibre is available in a lot of places, but with gigabit lte now and 5g
soon, along with gigabit wisps, there's little need for that anymore.

What's the cost relationship for hardware and service for the various
methods?


costs varies, but the point is that wireless is replacing wired because
of its numerous advantages, with little to no downside.

verizon offers wired gigabit fios for $80/mo, with 1 year of netflix
included, although that's a promotional rate for new customers. the
renewal rate is higher, and installation is also extra.
https://www.verizon.com/home/fios-gigabit-connection/


Again BS. Fios is only in 9 states and only in the their metro areas.
They have not expanded their build-out in over 10 years. The only fiber
they are laying is for their wireless offerings.


verizon is starting to deploy 5g wireless internet for $70/mo (or less
for verizon cellular customers), although only in a few cities as of
now, expanding as 5g is deployed:
https://www.verizonwireless.com/5g/home/ Just $70/mo First 3 months free. Existing Verizon customers get
service for just $50/mo


And in a few cities is where it will remain. If it requires antennas
feet apart not miles I don't see them mounting to trees and deer!

https://www.androidauthority.com/verizon-5g-916577/
Verizon launched its 5G-based home networking service in parts of
Houston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles and Sacramento on October 1.
...
According to Verizon, customers will see an average download speed of
300Mbps and a maximum download speed of 940Mbps with no data caps.
By comparison, you can get a Charter Spectrum wiredĀ*connection at
300Mbps for around the same price, but youĀ¹ll never see the maximum
speed reported by Version. [sic]


Do data caps on wireless? Yeah, technically but they never mention the
throttling.

...
Real-world testing shows the current download speeds can surpass
VerizonĀ¹s advertised 300Mbps, hitting 600Mbps and 800Mbps. These
tests were conducted by Emil Olbrich, VP of networks at Signals
Research Group.

another wireless provider is webpass, offering up to gigabit speeds for
$60/mo, or ~45/mo paid yearly, currently in seven cities:
https://webpass.net/service_facts


What is the upload? I only got the lower tier 100Mbps plan and get 94-98
down and 90-97 upload.


yet another wireless provider is starry internet, also in its rollout
phase and in limited cities, with speeds as high as gigabit, although
due to capacity limitations, is currently offering 200 mbit for $50 and
will even pay early termination fees to switch, which is a compelling
incentive for anyone in their service area (which is expanding):

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6...fast-internet-
access-is-coming-to-your-home/
Starry says it has measured speeds from 300 megabits per second to
more than one gigabit per second at a range of between one and 1.5
kilometersā€¹even amid rain or snow.

https://support.starry.com/hc/en-us/...-I-want-to-swi
tch-to-Starry-but-I-would-have-to-pay-an-early-termination-fee-with-my-o
ld-internet-provider-Does-Starry-reimburse-early-termination-fees-
Starry Internet will issue you an account credit of up to $200 as
reimbursement for any early cancelation fees you may incur with
your previous internet service provider.


Starry Internet is essentially what I had here. It MUST be line of site
and limited in range. As to weather, not too bad. Not at all like
satellite where a dusting of snow or pending rain storm would kill the
signal. Not to mention the 1000-2000ms latency!!! Snow didn't bother the
signal much, but a heavy rain did.


https://www.lightreading.com/service...starry-scores-
$100m-more-for-wireless-broadband/d/d-id/744476
Starry is expected to use the funds to fuel a plan to expand service
to another 16 cities over the next year, including New York,
Cleveland, Chicago, Houston, Dallas, Denver, Seattle, Detroit,
Atlanta, Indianapolis, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Miami and
Minneapolis, among others.

tl;dr wireless is *very* competitive with wired, and it's still in its
early stages.

Not in my experience.


--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
 




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