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Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10



 
 
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  #46  
Old March 8th 19, 08:36 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,free.spam
Panthera Tigris Altaica
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 85
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 2019-03-07 19:19, John Doe wrote:
Regular troll from Apple groups...

Sigh. He's not trolling.

He's also not completely correct. Up until OS X Snow Leopard was
released in 2009, Mac users could and often did run truly ancient
software. I, personally, was able to run software written for Mac Pluses
with 9" black&white (not grey scale) displays on iMacs with 20" 24-bit
colour displays. I still have an old eMac (17" 24-bit display) which I
occasionally start up to play older games, which no longer run on new
machines because starting with Snow Leopard support was removed. Apple
does, however, give plenty of warning that something's going away.
They've been letting people know that 32-bit support is going for some
time now. They 'depreciated' certain networking protocols (Open
Transport) with the arrival of OS X Tiger in 2005 and finally killed it
with OS X Mavericks in 2013, a stay of execution of eight years. That
kind of thing is not unusual.
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  #47  
Old March 8th 19, 08:36 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,free.spam
Panthera Tigris Altaica
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 85
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 2019-03-08 14:25, T wrote:
On 3/7/19 4:19 PM, John Doe wrote:
Regular troll from Apple groups...


I was unaware that Apple had a newsgroup.


Many of them. David B., an infestation here, also infests some of them.
  #48  
Old March 8th 19, 08:51 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10,free.spam
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

In article , Panthera Tigris Altaica
wrote:

On 2019-03-07 19:19, John Doe wrote:
Regular troll from Apple groups...

Sigh. He's not trolling.

He's also not completely correct. Up until OS X Snow Leopard was
released in 2009, Mac users could and often did run truly ancient
software. I, personally, was able to run software written for Mac Pluses
with 9" black&white (not grey scale) displays on iMacs with 20" 24-bit
colour displays. I still have an old eMac (17" 24-bit display) which I
occasionally start up to play older games, which no longer run on new
machines because starting with Snow Leopard support was removed. Apple
does, however, give plenty of warning that something's going away.
They've been letting people know that 32-bit support is going for some
time now. They 'depreciated' certain networking protocols (Open
Transport) with the arrival of OS X Tiger in 2005 and finally killed it
with OS X Mavericks in 2013, a stay of execution of eight years. That
kind of thing is not unusual.


which is what i said, that apple goes out of their way to maintain
compatibility, although eventually, some stuff will stop working when
newer stuff replaces it.

the fact that apps written for a 1986 era mac plus with a 68000 cpu and
b/w display ran perfectly on a 2005 era mac with a powerpc cpu and a
large colour display running completely different operating system is
quite a feat.
  #49  
Old March 8th 19, 10:46 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mayayana
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Posts: 5,355
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

"T" wrote

| As far as I can tell, you can run 16 bit on w10-32 bit,
| but not on w10-64 bit.
|

Yes. That's been discussed several times. Microsoft
builds in a "shim". They did it for Win16 when they
moved to Win32. They also did it for Win32 when they
moved to 64. The shim is a translator that handles
the transition. But there's no shim for 16 to 64.

| Oh my goodness the things new version of Windows breaks!
| My experience is the opposite of yours.
|
You keep saying that, but what specifically broke?
Most software should run fine on different Windows
versions.

| If you are having trouble running Linux, you could always ping me.
| I will help if I can. Lord know I own you a bunch of favors anyway.
|

Thanks, but the times I've tried Linux I didn't really
have trouble so much as I didn't like it. I had a few
basic requirements:

* To be able to do what I need without opening console
windows to type command lines. Life is too short for
command line and there's just no excuse for needing it.
It's a symptom of lazy programmers who can't bother
to finish their software properly.

* To have a simple, easy firewall that will block outgoing
processes as well as inbound, and let me choose to
enable only specific processes to go out.

Linux has completely failed at those two simple
requirements -- for decades. Then of course there's
the glaring problem of no software. (No, GIMP is
not adequate.)

If I needed to set up servers it would be worth it to
me to figure it out. But I want a desktop. And Linux
is simply not a good desktop system. I used to have
it in a dual boot setup but I just had no use for it.

| And Apple deliberately
| breaks things to force people to buy new. It's 3
| different markets: business, geek, retail consumer.
|
| I call it the Apple Straight Jacket. The mommy state
| gone berserk.

Yes. Even down to the cutesy icons that look like a
12-year-old girl drew them. But they do make pretty
stuff and most of it is very stable. Some people don't
care what it costs to get that convenience.


  #50  
Old March 8th 19, 10:58 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,318
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 3/8/19 2:46 PM, Mayayana wrote:
You keep saying that, but what specifically broke?
Most software should run fine on different Windows
versions.


Quickbooks, quicken, every Point-of-sale software,
you have to spend endless hours on the phone to India
and patch, patch, patch.
  #51  
Old March 8th 19, 11:01 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,318
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 3/8/19 2:46 PM, Mayayana wrote:
* To be able to do what I need without opening console
windows to type command lines. Life is too short for
command line and there's just no excuse for needing it.
It's a symptom of lazy programmers who can't bother
to finish their software properly.


You can do everything both ways now. I find the command
line more convenient for some things and the GUI for others.
It is my choice.

What specifically are you having trouble with?

I use the command line a lot in Windows too.


* To have a simple, easy firewall that will block outgoing
processes as well as inbound, and let me choose to
enable only specific processes to go out.


firewalld. And there is a GUI for it too.

Fire up a LIVE USB from Fedora Spins (Mate is really simple,
Xfce is got bugs at the moment). Things have
changed a lot since you last looked.





  #52  
Old March 9th 19, 01:43 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,355
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

"T" wrote

| You keep saying that, but what specifically broke?
| Most software should run fine on different Windows
| versions.
|
| Quickbooks, quicken, every Point-of-sale software,
| you have to spend endless hours on the phone to India
| and patch, patch, patch.

I've never used Quicken, but according to their website
it's rental software and the current version supports
Win7-10, 32 and 64. You mean you had Quicken for XP
and it won't run on 7/10? I guess I wouldn't be so
surprised by that. They seem to link it to MS Office
and there are probably big changes each year to
accommodate tax changes. It's hard to see why you'd
be wanting to install 2005 or earlier Quicken.

Every POS software? you mean software for cash
registers? That doesn't run on Win10 but did on 7?
I'm surprised. Most that I see hasn't even upgraded
from XP. But I would have assumed it was superficial
level stuff that doesn't depend on special Windows
versions. What doesn't work?


  #53  
Old March 9th 19, 01:55 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,318
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 3/8/19 5:43 PM, Mayayana wrote:
"T" wrote

| You keep saying that, but what specifically broke?
| Most software should run fine on different Windows
| versions.
|
| Quickbooks, quicken, every Point-of-sale software,
| you have to spend endless hours on the phone to India
| and patch, patch, patch.

I've never used Quicken, but according to their website
it's rental software and the current version supports
Win7-10, 32 and 64. You mean you had Quicken for XP
and it won't run on 7/10? I guess I wouldn't be so
surprised by that. They seem to link it to MS Office
and there are probably big changes each year to
accommodate tax changes. It's hard to see why you'd
be wanting to install 2005 or earlier Quicken.

Every POS software? you mean software for cash
registers? That doesn't run on Win10 but did on 7?
I'm surprised. Most that I see hasn't even upgraded
from XP. But I would have assumed it was superficial
level stuff that doesn't depend on special Windows
versions. What doesn't work?



It is a cluster bomb. I am surprised you have had
such good luck and I know you are being genuine!
  #54  
Old March 9th 19, 02:12 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,355
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

"T" wrote

| * To have a simple, easy firewall that will block outgoing
| processes as well as inbound, and let me choose to
| enable only specific processes to go out.
|
| firewalld. And there is a GUI for it too.
|

Yet another iptables wrapper. "Written in python.
It was intended to be ported to C++, but the porting
project was abandoned in January 2015."

So it's a script wrapper that's no longer supported?

"Firewalld currently does not support outbound rules to the same capacity of
inbound rules. Limitations include things such on ipsets, service names, and
default outbound block by default rules required by standards such as NIST
800-171 and 800-53. Default block all needs to be done at the "raw" IPTables
level via the --direct flag, and with the order of operations FirewallD uses
to prioritize Rrules, rich rules, direct rules, it may be easier to enter
all rules for outbound via --direct or use iptables (netfilter-persist) "

That doesn't sound very user-friendly to me. Or
very functional. No support for "default outbound
block by default"? Is it me, or are they saying it
doesn't really work as a firewall? The only feature
I specifically requested was "default outbound block
by default".

"The firewalld.conf file in /etc/firewalld provides the base configuration
for firewalld."

Oh, goody. The old /etc config file trick. I don't
even know if it's a usable firewall yet but their
website is already telling me all sorts of technical
details.

But there's a nice diagram that explains it all he

https://firewalld.org/documentation/concepts.html

Can I block outgoing per-process? I have no idea.
It doesn't sound promising. Sounds like I'd have to
start by adjusting the programs that are default
whitelisted to control the firewall themselves. (!)
Huh?! What kind of firewall would default whitelist
programs that are allowed to adjust the firewall?!
This sounds like some kind of horror show that
runs on an iPhone....

In Windows I get a dialogue when anything tries
to go out, unless there's already a rule for that
program. I then choose the setting I want. That's
it. Simple. common sense. And if I want to I can
specify protocols and ports.

In firewalld? Who knows. I'd have to read all the
technical docs to understand what it is, then I
guess I'd also need to familiarize myself with the
Linux network APIs so that I could understand
the docs.
It seems to be connected with something called
DBus. Let's look up DBus. Let's see. It's seems to
be a means for both RPC and local inter-process
communication. Well why didn't you say so?
(I happen to be one of the 1 in 500 people who
knows what RPC is.)
But I don't want any RPC functionality. That's part
of why I need a firewall. Hmm.

The homepage does have a list of features, but
most of it means nothing to me. "Complete D-Bus
API with bridge and ipset support." Sounds good,
whatever that is. But why do I need an API? In
Windows I click a button. I don't see anything in
the feature list like, "Control online access of all
software, on a per-process basis." It does say
it has "Timed firewall rules in zones". Timed rules?
Who wants timed rules? I don't want MS spyware
calling home at 1PM but it's OK after 5? And what's
a zone? I don't have any zones. I have a computer.
.... Never mind. I'm getting tired.


  #55  
Old March 9th 19, 03:24 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,318
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 3/8/19 6:12 PM, Mayayana wrote:
"T" wrote

| * To have a simple, easy firewall that will block outgoing
| processes as well as inbound, and let me choose to
| enable only specific processes to go out.
|
| firewalld. And there is a GUI for it too.
|

Yet another iptables wrapper. "Written in python.
It was intended to be ported to C++, but the porting
project was abandoned in January 2015."

So it's a script wrapper that's no longer supported?

"Firewalld currently does not support outbound rules to the same capacity of
inbound rules. Limitations include things such on ipsets, service names, and
default outbound block by default rules required by standards such as NIST
800-171 and 800-53. Default block all needs to be done at the "raw" IPTables
level via the --direct flag, and with the order of operations FirewallD uses
to prioritize Rrules, rich rules, direct rules, it may be easier to enter
all rules for outbound via --direct or use iptables (netfilter-persist) "

That doesn't sound very user-friendly to me. Or
very functional. No support for "default outbound
block by default"? Is it me, or are they saying it
doesn't really work as a firewall? The only feature
I specifically requested was "default outbound block
by default".

"The firewalld.conf file in /etc/firewalld provides the base configuration
for firewalld."

Oh, goody. The old /etc config file trick. I don't
even know if it's a usable firewall yet but their
website is already telling me all sorts of technical
details.

But there's a nice diagram that explains it all he

https://firewalld.org/documentation/concepts.html

Can I block outgoing per-process? I have no idea.
It doesn't sound promising. Sounds like I'd have to
start by adjusting the programs that are default
whitelisted to control the firewall themselves. (!)
Huh?! What kind of firewall would default whitelist
programs that are allowed to adjust the firewall?!
This sounds like some kind of horror show that
runs on an iPhone....

In Windows I get a dialogue when anything tries
to go out, unless there's already a rule for that
program. I then choose the setting I want. That's
it. Simple. common sense. And if I want to I can
specify protocols and ports.

In firewalld? Who knows. I'd have to read all the
technical docs to understand what it is, then I
guess I'd also need to familiarize myself with the
Linux network APIs so that I could understand
the docs.
It seems to be connected with something called
DBus. Let's look up DBus. Let's see. It's seems to
be a means for both RPC and local inter-process
communication. Well why didn't you say so?
(I happen to be one of the 1 in 500 people who
knows what RPC is.)
But I don't want any RPC functionality. That's part
of why I need a firewall. Hmm.

The homepage does have a list of features, but
most of it means nothing to me. "Complete D-Bus
API with bridge and ipset support." Sounds good,
whatever that is. But why do I need an API? In
Windows I click a button. I don't see anything in
the feature list like, "Control online access of all
software, on a per-process basis." It does say
it has "Timed firewall rules in zones". Timed rules?
Who wants timed rules? I don't want MS spyware
calling home at 1PM but it's OK after 5? And what's
a zone? I don't have any zones. I have a computer.
... Never mind. I'm getting tired.




You could always use iptables. That is what I use on
mine and my customer's servers. No GUI though

  #56  
Old March 9th 19, 02:34 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mayayana
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,355
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

"T" wrote

| You could always use iptables. That is what I use on
| mine and my customer's servers. No GUI though
|

That's a good one. You've managed to not fulfill
both of my minimum Linux requirements with one
program. But of course that's not hard. And
naturally, once I got a version of Linux with a well
designed firewall, where I didn't need console
windows, I'd want software selection and long
term support. The two requirements that still can't
be fulfilled -- firewall and fixing the rough edges --
are just my requirements for minimum functionality
before I'd spend my time actually trying out the
rest of it.

The lack of a usable Linux desktop just keeps going
on, year after year. The fan base keep saying, "It's
great! Try it again. You'll be impressed." But over 2
decades the fan base have never actually listened.
If someone says they don't want to be forced to
command line, the fan base says, "Oh? I like command
line." If someone says, "But there's no software.",
the fan base says, "What? There's Firefox and GIMP
and Libre Office. How much do you need?"

The people using Linux are not using a desktop to
do work. Most are using Linux as servers, for special
purpose scientific uses, as kiosk systems, or they're
geeks who use Linux as a combination hobby, clubhouse
and social circle.

WINE is a good example in microcosm. It's been
going for over 20 years... 20 years!... Yet it's mainly
young geeks who want support for Windows games.
And the whole thing is backward. They're not providing
an API for Windows programmers. They're redirecting
every single function or combination of functions in
a Windows program to the Linux API. One program at
a time and one call at a time. They specifically don't
want to work with Windows programmers. So it's an
endless, one-fix-at-a-time approach. And typical of
Linux, there are virtually no docs. I once downloaded
the pitiful excuse for docs that WINE did have. It was
supposed to be compiled! I had to write a script to
turn the docs into readable files. You couldn't make up
this idiocy.

Why are they so resistant to docs? Because most
of the people writing the software and managing the
system are geeks with minimal English literacy. They
often say that themselves, explaining that they have
no docs because they hate writing docs. But they also
hate making things understandable. They want to be
able to talk in secret code with their friends, with no
one else understanding. In other words, they live in
a world of adolescent geek jargon, used to render their
social circle exclusive.

Problems like that are deep and systemic. Someone
making a sensible, usable firewall would help, but it's
unlikely that anything can ever turn Linux into a user-
friendly tool for any but the most extreme geeks. Which
is a sad, lost opportunity. DotNet was adapted to Linux,
despite having very little relevance there. If Linux people
could just take the trouble to create
crossover docs and tools for Windows programmers,
so that most Windows software could be ported easily,
that would go a long way toward making Linux usable.
But the core problem is that Linux people actually don't
want it to be usable. That would spoil the fun and the
imagined cachet.

On of the nicest things about Windows, to my mind, is
the lack of an emotional, biased fan base. Apple fans are
fiercely loyal suckers who turned Jobs into a guru. Jobs,
in turn, told them what they wanted to hear: That the
whole lemming school of overpaying Apple fans are people
who "think different". It was brilliant marketing. "You
want to do what I tell you to because you're an
independent thinker." Once they've swalllowed that kind
of pretzel logic they're hooked.

Linux fans are equally fanatic in other ways. It's
religious. Windows isn't religion. That's a critical
difference that Linux and Apple fans often miss.
Windows just gets the job done. It's not especially
pretty or quirky. It just works. People don't use it
because they think Gates or Nadella are genius gurus.
They just use it because it works and it's a standard
they can depend on. We don't go into Apple or Linux
groups to tell people they should switch. We couldn't
care less. (And anyway, people in the Linux groups
are too uncivilzed to talk to.


  #57  
Old March 9th 19, 03:35 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Panthera Tigris Altaica
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 85
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

On 2019-03-07 23:21, John Doe wrote:
"Jonathan N. Little" wrote:

Paul wrote:

And I still don't believe a bit, the stories about "I gave my
grandma Linux and she hasn't phoned back since".


Well for the folks that I have installed Ubuntu, a number of which
needed to ditch obsoleted XP, I received far fewer questions then
when they had Windows.


And the cow jumped over the moon.
I just did an install of Ubuntu (twice). Had to do everything via the
keyboard since it didn't recognize my Logitech mouse. That is unusual in
my experience, but everything Paul said sounds exactly right. Linux is a
server operating system. Always has been, always will be. No comparison
to Windows for the average user.


Err... I'd say that there's a problem with the mouse, probably that
particular mouse, not Ubuntu. Ubuntu works here with the touchpad on
this laptop, with Microsoft mice on this laptop and elsewhere, with
Logitech mice, including Logitech mice which are allergic to Macs, with
no-name 3rd-party very cheap mice, even with _Apple_ mice and Bluetooth
trackpads, which is a minor miracle.

I am becoming increasingly annoyed with Windows. This laptop is slowing
down and freezing more and more. In particular it is now taking a very
long time to load most non-Microsoft applications; MS Office loads in a
flash, other apps, especially LibreOffice, crawl. Gee, I wonder why this
might be. I am currently looking to replace the last few major
applications I run which require Windows with Linux equivalents. Once
that is done, this laptop gets one final backup just in case and then is
reformatted and re-deployed with Ubuntu, probably 1804 or 1810, unless
1904 delivers something I really like. That should stretch its life out
another two-three years, and when it finally dies I'll probably replace
it with another laptop formatted with Ubuntu. Or with a MacBook of some
kind, running Ubuntu in a VM. I am quite unlikely to get a new Windows
install unless there is significant change at Microsoft. I consider the
probability of there being significant change to approach zero quite
closely. YMMV.
  #58  
Old March 9th 19, 05:14 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,831
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

In article , Mayayana
wrote:


The lack of a usable Linux desktop just keeps going
on, year after year. The fan base keep saying, "It's
great! Try it again. You'll be impressed." But over 2
decades the fan base have never actually listened.
If someone says they don't want to be forced to
command line, the fan base says, "Oh? I like command
line." If someone says, "But there's no software.",
the fan base says, "What? There's Firefox and GIMP
and Libre Office. How much do you need?"

The people using Linux are not using a desktop to
do work. Most are using Linux as servers, for special
purpose scientific uses, as kiosk systems, or they're
geeks who use Linux as a combination hobby, clubhouse
and social circle.

WINE is a good example in microcosm. It's been
going for over 20 years... 20 years!... Yet it's mainly
young geeks who want support for Windows games.
And the whole thing is backward. They're not providing
an API for Windows programmers. They're redirecting
every single function or combination of functions in
a Windows program to the Linux API. One program at
a time and one call at a time. They specifically don't
want to work with Windows programmers. So it's an
endless, one-fix-at-a-time approach. And typical of
Linux, there are virtually no docs. I once downloaded
the pitiful excuse for docs that WINE did have. It was
supposed to be compiled! I had to write a script to
turn the docs into readable files. You couldn't make up
this idiocy.

Why are they so resistant to docs? Because most
of the people writing the software and managing the
system are geeks with minimal English literacy. They
often say that themselves, explaining that they have
no docs because they hate writing docs. But they also
hate making things understandable. They want to be
able to talk in secret code with their friends, with no
one else understanding. In other words, they live in
a world of adolescent geek jargon, used to render their
social circle exclusive.

Problems like that are deep and systemic. Someone
making a sensible, usable firewall would help, but it's
unlikely that anything can ever turn Linux into a user-
friendly tool for any but the most extreme geeks. Which
is a sad, lost opportunity. DotNet was adapted to Linux,
despite having very little relevance there. If Linux people
could just take the trouble to create
crossover docs and tools for Windows programmers,
so that most Windows software could be ported easily,
that would go a long way toward making Linux usable.
But the core problem is that Linux people actually don't
want it to be usable. That would spoil the fun and the
imagined cachet.

On of the nicest things about Windows, to my mind, is
the lack of an emotional, biased fan base. Apple fans are
fiercely loyal suckers who turned Jobs into a guru. Jobs,
in turn, told them what they wanted to hear: That the
whole lemming school of overpaying Apple fans are people
who "think different". It was brilliant marketing. "You
want to do what I tell you to because you're an
independent thinker." Once they've swalllowed that kind
of pretzel logic they're hooked.

Linux fans are equally fanatic in other ways. It's
religious. Windows isn't religion. That's a critical
difference that Linux and Apple fans often miss.
Windows just gets the job done. It's not especially
pretty or quirky. It just works. People don't use it
because they think Gates or Nadella are genius gurus.
They just use it because it works and it's a standard
they can depend on. We don't go into Apple or Linux
groups to tell people they should switch. We couldn't
care less. (And anyway, people in the Linux groups
are too uncivilzed to talk to.


what a wonderful demonstration of your hypocrisy.

first you insult all linux and apple users, then you try to claim that
windows users don't care.

you don't speak for all windows users, but if you didn't care, you
wouldn't have written so many paragraphs trashing everything.

why does it bother you so much what other people choose to use?
  #59  
Old March 10th 19, 12:43 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,832
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Panthera Tigris Altaica wrote:

Err... I'd say that there's a problem with the mouse, probably that
particular mouse, not Ubuntu.


Uhhuh.

Let me give you an example.

If you have a mouse with a high DPI behavior, Ubuntu
refuses to scale the DPI down and give the mouse normal
behavior.

We're told to "unplug the mouse and plug it in again".
Upon rediscover, for some reason, the scaling then
works properly.

And this "workaround" has been the answer "forever" :-/

Wunderbar. Ausgezeichnet.

I have two mice on the Test Machine. A Logitech mouse
(with conventional DPI) and a newer MS Mouse (with high DPI).
I got the MS Mouse, because that's all they had at Staples.

And I'm expected to unplug and plug that MS mouse in
over and over and over and over and... You get the idea.
The connector would have fallen off by now, if I had
followed that advice scrupulously.

Because "we're not fixing it". For some value of
"we're not fixing it".

Paul
  #60  
Old March 10th 19, 05:06 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 773
Default Reason *TO* pick on Windows 10

Paul wrote:
If you have a mouse with a high DPI behavior, Ubuntu
refuses to scale the DPI down and give the mouse normal
behavior.


No issue with my G5 and that has a high DPI...

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
 




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