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Can I install Win 10 like this?



 
 
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  #16  
Old March 14th 19, 09:17 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,758
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

KenW wrote:
On Wed, 13 Mar 2019 21:04:41 -0700, bilsch
wrote:

I currently have no Windows system on any PC. I have Ubuntu. I want to
purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on another PC
(an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop). I can make a bootable USB stick
using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file that
will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I assume
I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file that I will
need to enter during installation. I prefer to get the file from
Microsoft if possible. TIA. Bill S.


The Media Creation Tool can get the iso to burn or make a bootable ?
usb stick


The problem the OP is presenting to us is:

1) A Linux user "wants to switch to Windows"
2) The Linux user seems to have an option to purchase a license key.
3) The user wants to obtain media from MS to go with the key.
4) The target computer lacks an optical drive.
5) Now, how do we make a USB key using only a
Linux box, when MS will only give a Linux user "windows10.iso"
and MediaCreationTool won't run on a Linux box.

One of the limitations of USB key makers, is
some of them need low level access (/dev).
And that can prevent a WINE approach from working.
If you had a Windows tool that worked in WINE, that
might have been an option, but a typical tool like
the "Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe" won't work. It wants
to do stuff like format the USB stick and so on.
Whereas WINE uses ~/.wine/drive_c as an example
of the path to its storage area. WINE should not be
granting low level access to hardware. This is one of the
limitations as you move from platform to platform. High level
applications work, but fiddling with disk drivers or USB ports
is seldom an option.

*******

I did think of a way. I have a test setup that was already
pretty close to doing this. But, I could not get it to work.

1) Linux.
2) Install VirtualBox (package manager).
3) Install Windows 10 in VirtualBox.
Install Extension Pack (an optional tick box in package manager)
Install VirtualBox Additions (via internal CD image)
4) Install Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe
5) Enable USB passthru.
6) Insert USB key into Linux box port.
7) In Settings on VirtualBox, convince VirtualBox
to pass the USB key to the Windows 10 Guest.
8) Use Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe to make the USB key.
9) Boot the laptop with the USB key and perform
the installation, using the OPs favorite destructive
and messy options (installing Windows *after* Linux
is nasty, whereas the reverse order is easy).

Now, I've been trying to do that, but I *cannot*
get passthru to work in Linux. I have had passthru
work in Windows, but the very first time I did it,
I had to reinstall the software three times until
for some reason, it started working.

Conclusion: Buy the USB key version from Newegg!!!

*******

There are a raft of USB key makers from the open
source community, but they've never heard of Windows
and your chances of finding a working one are slim.
The above Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe , if you could find
the source and build for Linux, might work. I suspect
that program has "weird" origins, and wasn't written
by an actual MS employee. But I also haven't managed
to track it down.

The OP could track this down and try it. No promises.

http://www.webupd8.org/2017/06/tool-...ndows-usb.html

WoeUSB is available in the main WebUpd8 PPA, for
Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x.
To add the PPA and install WoeUSB, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

That one might be a kind of GRUB wrapper for the Windows image.

Paul
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  #17  
Old March 14th 19, 09:22 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,758
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

T wrote:
On 3/13/19 9:04 PM, bilsch wrote:
I currently have no Windows system on any PC. I have Ubuntu. I want
to purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on
another PC (an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop). I can make a bootable
USB stick using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file
that will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I
assume I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file
that I will need to enter during installation. I prefer to get the
file from Microsoft if possible. TIA. Bill S.



Hi Bilsch,

"dd" only works if you set the iso up correctly for it.
M$ does not.

You can burn the iso with K3b in Linux to a DVD.

The only way I have found to make it using Rufus from
a Window virtual machine.

I have not tried Jonathan's Startup Disk Creator suggestion,
but I'd go that route first.

-T


There are two "eras" of usb-creator-gtk.

The first era was "intelligent". It took apart the ISO,
and put the pieces on the USB stick for you, as well as
offering to add a 4GB "persistence" file so that your
/home could be stored on the stick too.

When the hybrid ISOs came out (supporting MSDOS and UEFI
boot, as well as having the ability to be used on a
USB key), the usb-creator-gtk was "converted" into
a call to "dd". It just dumps the ISO onto the USB stick,
sector by sector. No longer is usb-creator-gtk "magical"
in any sense. Consequently, a person who can read the
manual page for "dd" can manage to do this on their
very own, without hunting for the dressed-up-GUI-thingy.

And the thing is, you can spend all day evaluating stuff like this.

http://www.webupd8.org/2017/06/tool-...ndows-usb.html

Without really knowing for sure that it will work.

Paul
  #18  
Old March 14th 19, 10:00 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Mike
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 172
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

On 3/13/2019 9:04 PM, bilsch wrote:
I currently have no Windows system on any PC.* I have Ubuntu. I want to
purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on another PC
(an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop).* I can make a bootable USB stick
using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file that
will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I assume
I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file that I will
need to enter during installation.* I prefer to get the file from
Microsoft if possible.* TIA.** Bill S.


This thread has gone all over the map.
What's the objective?
If it's to get win10 on a machine, then

Do you have two friends? It's highly likely that at least one of them
has a windows machine that can run media creation tool to create
a win10 install thumbdrive. You could probably do it at a library,
but they may restrict operations like that.

Stuff the usb into your machine and install windows.
Unless they've changed it in the last few weeks, win10 works just fine
without a key.

Once you've decided that you like it, you have to decide whether you
want to risk MS retracting their offer to run without a key or purchase
a key to activate it. You have to make sure the key works with the
version you've installed. It may be that a win8 or win7 key will work,
maybe, sometimes. I've seen no consistency in what they will accept
on any machine.

According to the many discussions on the web, cheap keys are a crap shoot.
I expect that most of the keys purchased cheap are illegal/non-compliant
copied keys. That they work at all is because MS has not yet discovered
it or that they let is pass...until they don't.
Stated another way, I don't believe that a cheap key off ebay is any
safer in the long run than running unactivated.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

The effort expended on this thread is already far in excess of what
it would have taken you to quit futzing around with linux and use
a windows machine to make the windows install thumbdrive.
  #19  
Old March 14th 19, 10:51 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 773
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Paul wrote:
KenW wrote:
On Wed, 13 Mar 2019 21:04:41 -0700, bilsch
wrote:

I currently have no Windows system on any PC.* I have Ubuntu. I want
to purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on
another PC (an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop).* I can make a
bootable USB stick using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file
that will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I
assume I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file
that I will need to enter during installation.* I prefer to get the
file from Microsoft if possible.* TIA.** Bill S.


The Media Creation Tool can get the iso to burn or make a bootable ?
usb stick


The problem the OP is presenting to us is:

1) A Linux user "wants to switch to Windows"
2) The Linux user seems to have an option to purchase a license key.
3) The user wants to obtain media from MS to go with the key.
4) The target computer lacks an optical drive.
5) Now, how do we make a USB key using only a
** Linux box, when MS will only give a Linux user "windows10.iso"
** and MediaCreationTool won't run on a Linux box.

One of the limitations of USB key makers, is
some of them need low level access (/dev).
And that can prevent a WINE approach from working.
If you had a Windows tool that worked in WINE, that
might have been an option, but a typical tool like
the "Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe" won't work. It wants
to do stuff like format the USB stick and so on.
Whereas WINE uses ~/.wine/drive_c as an example
of the path to its storage area. WINE should not be
granting low level access to hardware. This is one of the
limitations as you move from platform to platform. High level
applications work, but fiddling with disk drivers or USB ports
is seldom an option.

*******

I did think of a way. I have a test setup that was already
pretty close to doing this. But, I could not get it to work.

1) Linux.
2) Install VirtualBox (package manager).


snip whatever

None of this is needed!!! OP has Ubuntu and wants to make a Windows
bootable installer on a thumbdrive then none of all these suggestions
are needed. All the OP has to do is download the ISO from M$. Obtain a
thumbdrive large enough to accommodate the image. Stick it into a USB
slot. Start application Startup Disk Creator. Yes it there. 18.04 and up
'Show Applications' or older version click the BFB, Big Friggin Button
to open Dash. Type 'Startup Disk Creator' and start app. Point to ISO,
point to thumbdrive, CREATE. That is it!

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
  #20  
Old March 14th 19, 11:16 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,812
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

On Thu, 14 Mar 2019 18:51:58 -0400, "Jonathan N. Little"
wrote:

Paul wrote:
I did think of a way. I have a test setup that was already
pretty close to doing this. But, I could not get it to work.

1) Linux.
2) Install VirtualBox (package manager).


snip whatever

None of this is needed!!! OP has Ubuntu and wants to make a Windows
bootable installer on a thumbdrive then none of all these suggestions
are needed. All the OP has to do is download the ISO from M$. Obtain a
thumbdrive large enough to accommodate the image. Stick it into a USB
slot. Start application Startup Disk Creator. Yes it there. 18.04 and up
'Show Applications' or older version click the BFB, Big Friggin Button
to open Dash. Type 'Startup Disk Creator' and start app. Point to ISO,
point to thumbdrive, CREATE. That is it!


LOL
I knew this type of follow up was coming. It was only a matter of time.
Linux has been able to burn ISOs for probably longer than Windows has.

Thanks, Jonathan. That was excellent.


  #21  
Old March 14th 19, 11:28 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,758
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Jonathan N. Little wrote:
Paul wrote:
KenW wrote:
On Wed, 13 Mar 2019 21:04:41 -0700, bilsch
wrote:

I currently have no Windows system on any PC. I have Ubuntu. I want
to purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on
another PC (an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop). I can make a
bootable USB stick using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file
that will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I
assume I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file
that I will need to enter during installation. I prefer to get the
file from Microsoft if possible. TIA. Bill S.
The Media Creation Tool can get the iso to burn or make a bootable ?
usb stick

The problem the OP is presenting to us is:

1) A Linux user "wants to switch to Windows"
2) The Linux user seems to have an option to purchase a license key.
3) The user wants to obtain media from MS to go with the key.
4) The target computer lacks an optical drive.
5) Now, how do we make a USB key using only a
Linux box, when MS will only give a Linux user "windows10.iso"
and MediaCreationTool won't run on a Linux box.

One of the limitations of USB key makers, is
some of them need low level access (/dev).
And that can prevent a WINE approach from working.
If you had a Windows tool that worked in WINE, that
might have been an option, but a typical tool like
the "Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe" won't work. It wants
to do stuff like format the USB stick and so on.
Whereas WINE uses ~/.wine/drive_c as an example
of the path to its storage area. WINE should not be
granting low level access to hardware. This is one of the
limitations as you move from platform to platform. High level
applications work, but fiddling with disk drivers or USB ports
is seldom an option.

*******

I did think of a way. I have a test setup that was already
pretty close to doing this. But, I could not get it to work.

1) Linux.
2) Install VirtualBox (package manager).


snip whatever

None of this is needed!!! OP has Ubuntu and wants to make a Windows
bootable installer on a thumbdrive then none of all these suggestions
are needed. All the OP has to do is download the ISO from M$. Obtain a
thumbdrive large enough to accommodate the image. Stick it into a USB
slot. Start application Startup Disk Creator. Yes it there. 18.04 and up
'Show Applications' or older version click the BFB, Big Friggin Button
to open Dash. Type 'Startup Disk Creator' and start app. Point to ISO,
point to thumbdrive, CREATE. That is it!


This is the part I didn't bother posting.

*******

This is the setup of a Win10 disc. (I'm using the Cygwin disktype, also in Linux)
This shows the Win10 ISO is MSDOS/UEFI capable,
but there's no evidence of "flat USB" support.
This config is "too ordinary".

L:\disktype Win10_1809_English_x64.iso

--- Win10_1809_English_x64.iso
Regular file, size 3.585 GiB (3849388032 bytes)
UDF file system
Sector size 2048 bytes
Volume name "ESD-ISO"
UDF version 1.02
ISO9660 file system
Volume name "ESD_ISO"
Preparer "IMAPI2 (1.0) ISO9660 FORMATTER COPYRIGHT (C) 2004-2007 MICROSOFT"
Data size 3.585 GiB (3848847360 bytes, 1879320 blocks of 2 KiB)
El Torito boot record, catalog at 1442
Bootable non-emulated image, starts at 1443, preloads 4 KiB
Platform 0x00 (x86), System Type 0x00 (Empty)
Bootable non-emulated image, starts at 1445, preloads 1.406 MiB (1474560 bytes)
Platform 0xEF (EFI), System Type 0x00 (Empty)
Windows / MS-DOS boot loader
FAT12 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
Volume size 1.390 MiB (1457664 bytes, 2847 clusters of 512 bytes)
Volume name "EFISECTOR"

This is the setup of a Ubuntu disc (which can be dd'ed onto a USB flash).
The current usb-creator-gtk can do the "dd" for you. Notice the extra
"stuff" in here. My guess is, Partition 2 makes a difference. When
placed on the USB stick with "dd", multiple partitions will be
evident (if you examine with gnome-disks or gparted, as Windows
won't allow the multiple partitions to be viewable as such).

L:\disktype ubuntu-18.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso

--- ubuntu-18.04.1-desktop-amd64.iso
Regular file, size 1.819 GiB (1953349632 bytes)
DOS/MBR partition map
Partition 2: 2.281 MiB (2392064 bytes, 4672 sectors from 3737268)
Type 0xEF (EFI System (FAT))
FAT12 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
Volume size 2.260 MiB (2369536 bytes, 1157 clusters of 2 KiB)
GPT partition map, 208 entries
Disk size 1.819 GiB (1953349632 bytes, 3815136 sectors)
Disk GUID FFA91B1A-BF02-A940-9263-AC1983BAD47C
Partition 1: 1.819 GiB (1953320960 bytes, 3815080 sectors from 0)
Type Basic Data (GUID A2A0D0EB-E5B9-3344-87C0-68B6B72699C7)
Partition Name "ISOHybrid"
Partition GUID 3CA65E8A-BF02-A640-9261-6C1983BADAEA
Partition 2: 2.281 MiB (2392064 bytes, 4672 sectors from 3737268)
Type Basic Data (GUID A2A0D0EB-E5B9-3344-87C0-68B6B72699C7)
Partition Name "ISOHybrid1"
Partition GUID 60D40696-BF02-D440-9260-3C1983BADE7B
FAT12 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
Volume size 2.260 MiB (2369536 bytes, 1157 clusters of 2 KiB)
Partition 3: unused
ISO9660 file system
Volume name "Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS amd64"
Preparer "XORRISO-1.2.4 2012.07.20.130001, LIBISOBURN-1.2.4, LIBISOFS-1.2.4, LIBBURN-1.2.4"
Data size 1.819 GiB (1953349632 bytes, 953784 blocks of 2 KiB)
El Torito boot record, catalog at 191
Bootable non-emulated image, starts at 932694, preloads 2 KiB
Platform 0x00 (x86), System Type 0x00 (Empty)
ISOLINUX boot loader
Bootable non-emulated image, starts at 934317, preloads 2.281 MiB (2392064 bytes)
Platform 0xEF (EFI), System Type 0x00 (Empty)
FAT12 file system (hints score 5 of 5)
Volume size 2.260 MiB (2369536 bytes, 1157 clusters of 2 KiB)
Joliet extension, volume name "Ubuntu 18.04.1 L"

The "extra stuff" on the Ubuntu image, is what gives it USB support.

If you want to spend your time "dd"ing that Windows 10 image to
a USB stick, be my guest.

I'll give a hint about Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe .

It extracts a copy of "bootsect.exe" from the ISO it's
been asked to copy to the USB stick, and... it uses it.
And that's the evidence that a "transform" is required,
not just a "copy" of the ISO. It's doing *something* to
prepare the image for usage on USB. I don't have source for it,
so I don't know what else it is doing.

Things like winusb or woeusb would be wrapping the content
with their own solution (SYSLINUX?).

I used to spend time randomly copying stuff onto USB sticks,
trying to boot, having failure, try the next thing. i don't
do that now. I'll let someone else re-try all these experiments.
I at least expect to see a "success pattern" in the media,
before I'll waste the time now.

Paul
  #22  
Old March 15th 19, 01:39 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,758
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Paul wrote:
KenW wrote:
On Wed, 13 Mar 2019 21:04:41 -0700, bilsch
wrote:

I currently have no Windows system on any PC. I have Ubuntu. I want
to purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on
another PC (an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop). I can make a
bootable USB stick using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file
that will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I
assume I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file
that I will need to enter during installation. I prefer to get the
file from Microsoft if possible. TIA. Bill S.


The Media Creation Tool can get the iso to burn or make a bootable ?
usb stick


The problem the OP is presenting to us is:

1) A Linux user "wants to switch to Windows"
2) The Linux user seems to have an option to purchase a license key.
3) The user wants to obtain media from MS to go with the key.
4) The target computer lacks an optical drive.
5) Now, how do we make a USB key using only a
Linux box, when MS will only give a Linux user "windows10.iso"
and MediaCreationTool won't run on a Linux box.

One of the limitations of USB key makers, is
some of them need low level access (/dev).
And that can prevent a WINE approach from working.
If you had a Windows tool that worked in WINE, that
might have been an option, but a typical tool like
the "Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe" won't work. It wants
to do stuff like format the USB stick and so on.
Whereas WINE uses ~/.wine/drive_c as an example
of the path to its storage area. WINE should not be
granting low level access to hardware. This is one of the
limitations as you move from platform to platform. High level
applications work, but fiddling with disk drivers or USB ports
is seldom an option.

*******

I did think of a way. I have a test setup that was already
pretty close to doing this. But, I could not get it to work.

1) Linux.
2) Install VirtualBox (package manager).
3) Install Windows 10 in VirtualBox.
Install Extension Pack (an optional tick box in package manager)
Install VirtualBox Additions (via internal CD image)
4) Install Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe
5) Enable USB passthru.
6) Insert USB key into Linux box port.
7) In Settings on VirtualBox, convince VirtualBox
to pass the USB key to the Windows 10 Guest.
8) Use Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe to make the USB key.
9) Boot the laptop with the USB key and perform
the installation, using the OPs favorite destructive
and messy options (installing Windows *after* Linux
is nasty, whereas the reverse order is easy).

Now, I've been trying to do that, but I *cannot*
get passthru to work in Linux. I have had passthru
work in Windows, but the very first time I did it,
I had to reinstall the software three times until
for some reason, it started working.

Conclusion: Buy the USB key version from Newegg!!!

*******

There are a raft of USB key makers from the open
source community, but they've never heard of Windows
and your chances of finding a working one are slim.
The above Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe , if you could find
the source and build for Linux, might work. I suspect
that program has "weird" origins, and wasn't written
by an actual MS employee. But I also haven't managed
to track it down.

The OP could track this down and try it. No promises.

http://www.webupd8.org/2017/06/tool-...ndows-usb.html

WoeUSB is available in the main WebUpd8 PPA, for
Ubuntu 17.04, 16.10, 16.04 or 14.04 / Linux Mint 18.x or 17.x.
To add the PPA and install WoeUSB, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8
sudo apt update
sudo apt install woeusb

That one might be a kind of GRUB wrapper for the Windows image.

Paul


Some more test results.

1) A "dd" transfer of Windows10.iso to a USB stick
did not work. It would not boot.

A cursory examination of the ISO file in a hex editor,
helps re-enforce why.

The first 64K or so of the ISO file is all zeros.

The BIOS, when doing HDD emulation of USB devices,
is expecting one of two things. A file system header
sector with 0xAA55 signature in the last two bytes of
the sector. Or, an MBR with 0xAA55 signature in the
last two bytes. The MBR has a boot sector. The file
system header would likely have a PBR located a few
sectors from the file system header sector.

The ISO shoved onto a USB key, is only going to work,
if the BIOS HDD emulation of the USB key has "something"
in sector 0 besides "all zeros". At a guess.

I put the "dd"ed stick in the PC, and it prompted ignored
my popup boot request, and booted the first thing it could
find with a valid first sector.

2) I got virtualbox working.

1) Linux.
2) Install VirtualBox (package manager).
3) Install Windows 10 in VirtualBox.
Install Extension Pack (an optional tick box in package manager)
4) A new group will appear in /etc/group. That is vboxusers.
"adduser bullwinkle vboxusers". That adds the user bullwinkle
to the vboxusers in /etc/group amongst other places. It's
not clear whether, or why, this is necessary.
5) The other "known unknown", is the Extension Pack "likely"
uses DKMS or it inserts a module in the kernel, or something
of that ilk. Using the package manager (synaptic), I
requested the reinstallation of the current kernel package
("linux-image") in the hope that this would trigger DKMS and
"integrate" whatever the Oracle software had set up. I got no
complaints from the Oracle Extension Pack installation process,
so I was flying blind on what was missing. This was the closed
thing to a "Hail Mary" I could think of.

6) Install Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe in Win10 Guest VM.
7) Enable USB passthru.
8) Insert USB key into Linux box port.
Look in the VirtualBox Settings on the Win10 Guest
machine, for the "new" entry corresponding to the USB stick.
This will pass the USB key to the Windows 10 Guest.

If it still doesn't work, try:

Install VirtualBox Additions (via internal CD image) into Win10 Guest.
It's a menu item in the VirtualBox menu bar.

9) Use Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe in Win10 Guest to make the bootable USB key.
If the dialog claims that "bootsect did not work", ignore
that and try and boot the machine with the new USB key anyway.
In my example, I used a 64GB USB stick, which had an 8GB NTFS
partition at the front, as the tool.exe will throw a hissy fit
if the partition is too large. You'd think if they had "preferences"
in the matter, they'd just prep the damn key themselves. This
is a tradition with USB stick software, stretching back to the
stupid tool HP kindly provided :-/ The user has to "goose the key"
just the right way, before the tool will work.

10) Boot the laptop with the USB key and perform
the installation, using the OPs favorite destructive
and messy options (installing Windows *after* Linux
is nasty, whereas the reverse order is easy).

So that recipe, of making a working USB key, works. And
it uses no more materials than the download of the
Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe , plus a set of materials
in the Ubuntu Linux package manager. No need for dodgy or
untrusted .ppas from hither and yon.

https://i.postimg.cc/0NKqdMwv/00-vir...x-passthru.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/sx6nNmkN/01-vir...x-ext-pack.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/cJRFSdqY/02-vir...k-download.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/9M11D1QQ/03-win...v1-enabled.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/bvhRL4Gv/04-prepare-materials.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/0jbGbs4V/05-vir...y-passthru.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/4d3VSGXX/06-vir...led-inside.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/5jWHbWWY/07-USB...peed-check.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/637fYZV9/08-tool-installed.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/7Y1MswzT/09-tool-opens-file.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/6QqrpZmd/10-pic...k-passthru.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/2jh4yr2X/11-request-to-erase.gif
https://i.postimg.cc/05YwxZyT/12-cra...n-bootsect.gif

In (12), the message says bootsect didn't work, but it did work...

Paul
  #23  
Old March 15th 19, 08:18 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 773
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Paul wrote:
snip all

Okay, with the Ubuntu version 16.04 the 'Startup Disk Creator' will not
do the Windows ISO. However the following DOES WORK. I just tested it.

To OP follow these steps

1) Go to MS website and download Windows ISO

2) Get a usb key 6 GB or greater. I used a 32GB Sandisk. Insert it.

3) Open a terminal window CTRL+ALT+T and enter one-liner to install WoeUSB:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8 && sudo apt update &&
sudo apt install woeusb

4) You have to discover the device for the USB KEY and you must unmount
it because it auto-mounted via fuse when you stuck it into your USB slot.

cat /etc/mtab

On mine the line started:
/dev/sdb1 /media/jonathan/VOLUME_IDENTIFIER ...

Two things to note the device path without the partition number, in this
case '/dev/sdb' and the mountpoint '/media/jonathan/VOLUME_IDENTIFIER'

5) Unmount the key but leave it in the slot. No sudo needed it's mounted
in userspace.

umount /media/jonathan/VOLUME_IDENTIFIER

6) Now run the woeusb command specifying ISO and filesytem parameters. I
am should full paths in my example for clarity:

sudo woeusb --target-filesystem NTFS --device
/home/jonathan/Downloads/Win10_1809Oct_English_x64.iso /dev/sdb

Booted into Windows setup just fine. Does create two partitions on key
with the probematic UEFI partition that frustrates other methods. Here
is my mtab for the formatted key:

/dev/sdb2 /media/jonathan/UEFI_NTFS vfat
rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,uid=1000,gid=1000,fmask=0 022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,showexec,utf8,flush,errors=remou nt-ro
0 0

/dev/sdb1 /media/jonathan/Windows\040USB fuseblk
rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,defa ult_permissions,allow_other,blksize=4096
0 0


--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
  #24  
Old March 15th 19, 09:38 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,758
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Jonathan N. Little wrote:
Paul wrote:
snip all

Okay, with the Ubuntu version 16.04 the 'Startup Disk Creator' will not
do the Windows ISO. However the following DOES WORK. I just tested it.

To OP follow these steps

1) Go to MS website and download Windows ISO

2) Get a usb key 6 GB or greater. I used a 32GB Sandisk. Insert it.

3) Open a terminal window CTRL+ALT+T and enter one-liner to install WoeUSB:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8 && sudo apt update &&
sudo apt install woeusb

4) You have to discover the device for the USB KEY and you must unmount
it because it auto-mounted via fuse when you stuck it into your USB slot.

cat /etc/mtab

On mine the line started:
/dev/sdb1 /media/jonathan/VOLUME_IDENTIFIER ...

Two things to note the device path without the partition number, in this
case '/dev/sdb' and the mountpoint '/media/jonathan/VOLUME_IDENTIFIER'

5) Unmount the key but leave it in the slot. No sudo needed it's mounted
in userspace.

umount /media/jonathan/VOLUME_IDENTIFIER

6) Now run the woeusb command specifying ISO and filesytem parameters. I
am should full paths in my example for clarity:

sudo woeusb --target-filesystem NTFS --device
/home/jonathan/Downloads/Win10_1809Oct_English_x64.iso /dev/sdb

Booted into Windows setup just fine. Does create two partitions on key
with the probematic UEFI partition that frustrates other methods. Here
is my mtab for the formatted key:

/dev/sdb2 /media/jonathan/UEFI_NTFS vfat
rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,uid=1000,gid=1000,fmask=0 022,dmask=0022,codepage=437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,showexec,utf8,flush,errors=remou nt-ro
0 0

/dev/sdb1 /media/jonathan/Windows\040USB fuseblk
rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,defa ult_permissions,allow_other,blksize=4096
0 0


We're trusting a .ppa though. I don't
even know the person porting this and what
reputation they have. As some sort of metric.

It is, after all, a fork of another tool. Which
means a miscreant *could* be a malware expert and
not a boot expert, just reusing the boot-making code
and be up to monkey-business.

I don't automatically trust everyone on the Internet.
My methods aren't all that rigorous, or even worth
documenting. Lots of my trust metric is based
on "appearances", "things that defy gravity", and
so on. For example, if someone uses a "packer",
then it could be to save bandwidth. But if they're
on Sourceforge, now their bandwidth is "free", so
that's a danger sign. And if I find a project
which is packed with *2* packers, that's automatically
off limits. The garbage smell from that is... horrible.

For me to test the above, I have to have a reason
to trust them. And a setup where it can't cause
immediate damage.

Paul
  #25  
Old March 15th 19, 10:10 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Jonathan N. Little[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 773
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Paul wrote:
It is, after all, a fork of another tool. Which
means a miscreant *could* be a malware expert and
not a boot expert, just reusing the boot-making code
and be up to monkey-business.


1) The PPA is on launchpad and is copen for all to review
2) The code is on github https://github.com/slacka/WoeUSB and the
source is also reviewable and open for comments by others.

Big difference in transparency with OpenSource where the code is open
for review, whereas Win-folks have to trust the binaries they install
without hesitation. You only install things from the Microsoft Store?

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
  #26  
Old March 15th 19, 11:40 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,316
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

On 3/14/19 2:09 PM, T wrote:
On 3/14/19 1:20 PM, T wrote:
On 3/14/19 1:10 PM, Jonathan N. Little wrote:
T wrote:
On 3/14/19 12:36 PM, Jonathan N. Little wrote:
T wrote:
On 3/14/19 7:54 AM, Jonathan N. Little wrote:
It's call Startup Disk Creator in Ubuntu

Hi Jonathan,

*** What is its executable program file name?* I
want to see if there is an RPM for it.* It would
save a lot of hassle.



usb-creator-gtk



Thank you!

Fedora does not.* Rats!


Would not another RPM using distro do?

https://rpmfind.net/linux/rpm2html/search.php?query=liveusb-creator


Maybe.* I will have to check it out.* I may open a case
on RPM Fusion for it too.* rpmfind will have a srpm
for them to use.

Thank yoi!


The have "mediawriter", but I am not sure it supports M$'s ISO's



Nope.

I opened
https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1689459

  #27  
Old March 15th 19, 11:50 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,758
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

Jonathan N. Little wrote:
Paul wrote:
It is, after all, a fork of another tool. Which
means a miscreant *could* be a malware expert and
not a boot expert, just reusing the boot-making code
and be up to monkey-business.


1) The PPA is on launchpad and is copen for all to review
2) The code is on github https://github.com/slacka/WoeUSB and the
source is also reviewable and open for comments by others.

Big difference in transparency with OpenSource where the code is open
for review, whereas Win-folks have to trust the binaries they install
without hesitation. You only install things from the Microsoft Store?


Not all open source is open source.
Some of it is a sham.

How this works, is someone pretends to release code.
You see a directory full of files. Now, you're relaxed,
cause "well, he showed you the files, and obviously,
a million eyes will examine it".

Then, for ****s and giggles, you download that directory.
Of course, makefiles and .proj files are "magically
missing". "How could he forget those" ? Etc.

Then, after about a week of scrambling to put a project
file together, to build it, you get "cannot find X".
And you have a look around and realize... there's
a file missing. And none of the other "million eyes"
saw this ?

The million eyes are selective. For poorly packaged
goods, the eyes tend to glaze over. And you're really
not a lot safer.

Wasn't there some OpenSSL package where that happened ?
No subject matter experts to review the code. Poorly
formatted source, causing potential reviewer to turn away.
And the code had problems.

When things are in an actual tree, there's upstream
and downstream, at least "three or four eyes" looked
at it. You have the assurance someone noticed it
wouldn't compile, or they couldn't package it and
put it in the tree because it was broken.

All I'm doing, is encouraging people to be skeptical,
to think about the "what ifs". And use your experience
with these things, to decide what you're going to
trust or not trust. Like, everyone knows that a
promotional web site with spelling mistakes on it,
is a danger sign. You'd better know how to
spell, to use this detection method :-)

Paul
  #28  
Old March 16th 19, 02:08 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,316
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

On 3/15/19 1:18 PM, Jonathan N. Little wrote:
Paul wrote:
snip all

Okay, with the Ubuntu version 16.04 the 'Startup Disk Creator' will not
do the Windows ISO. However the following DOES WORK. I just tested it.

To OP follow these steps

1) Go to MS website and download Windows ISO

2) Get a usb key 6 GB or greater. I used a 32GB Sandisk. Insert it.

3) Open a terminal window CTRL+ALT+T and enter one-liner to install WoeUSB:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nilarimogard/webupd8 && sudo apt update &&
sudo apt install woeusb

4) You have to discover the device for the USB KEY and you must unmount
it because it auto-mounted via fuse when you stuck it into your USB slot.

  #29  
Old March 16th 19, 02:11 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,316
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

On 3/15/19 3:10 PM, Jonathan N. Little wrote:
Paul wrote:
It is, after all, a fork of another tool. Which
means a miscreant *could* be a malware expert and
not a boot expert, just reusing the boot-making code
and be up to monkey-business.


1) The PPA is on launchpad and is copen for all to review
2) The code is on github https://github.com/slacka/WoeUSB and the
source is also reviewable and open for comments by others.

Big difference in transparency with OpenSource where the code is open
for review, whereas Win-folks have to trust the binaries they install
without hesitation. You only install things from the Microsoft Store?


With Windows Stuff, I always run them through Virus Total
before trusting them

  #30  
Old March 16th 19, 02:13 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
T
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,316
Default Can I install Win 10 like this?

On 3/14/19 3:00 PM, Mike wrote:
On 3/13/2019 9:04 PM, bilsch wrote:
I currently have no Windows system on any PC.* I have Ubuntu. I want
to purchase and download a Win10 bootable install iso for use on
another PC (an old Dell Inspiron N4110 laptop).* I can make a bootable
USB stick using linux command line something like:

dd if=windowsinstall.iso of=/dev/sdb

I know how to do that.

What i need to know is where to purchase and download the iso file
that will boot the laptop into the Windows 10 installation routine. I
assume I will get a long registration code when I purchase the file
that I will need to enter during installation.* I prefer to get the
file from Microsoft if possible.* TIA.** Bill S.


This thread has gone all over the map.
What's the objective?
If it's to get win10 on a machine, then

Do you have two friends?* It's highly likely that at least one of them
has a windows machine that can run media creation tool to create
a win10 install thumbdrive.* You could probably do it at a library,
but they may restrict operations like that.

Stuff the usb into your machine and install windows.
Unless they've changed it in the last few weeks, win10 works just fine
without a key.

Once you've decided that you like it,* you have to decide whether you
want to risk MS retracting their offer to run without a key or purchase
a key to activate it.* You have to make sure the key works with the
version you've installed.* It may be that a win8 or win7 key will work,
maybe, sometimes. I've seen no consistency in what they will accept
on any machine.

According to the many discussions on the web, cheap keys are a crap shoot.
I expect that most of the keys purchased cheap are illegal/non-compliant
copied keys.* That they work at all is because MS has not yet discovered
it or that they let is pass...until they don't.
Stated another way, I don't believe that a cheap key off ebay is any
safer in the long run than running unactivated.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

The effort expended on this thread is already far in excess of what
it would have taken you to quit futzing around with linux and use
a windows machine to make the windows install thumbdrive.



Jonathan instructions with woeusb work perfectly for me
on Fedora 29. Should work perfectly for
you too on ubooboo (I can't spell ubuntoo)

 




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