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power options



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 19th 19, 04:40 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Guadalupe
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Posts: 10
Default power options

What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?
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  #2  
Old September 19th 19, 10:56 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Stephen Wolstenholme[_7_]
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Posts: 3
Default power options

On Wed, 18 Sep 2019 23:40:16 -0400, Guadalupe
wrote:

What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?


I use the Balanced power option on my desktop. It is used for about a
hour in the morning and another hour at night.

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  #3  
Old September 19th 19, 02:17 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 10,218
Default power options

Guadalupe wrote:
What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?


Computers have sleep and hibernate options.

Hibernate saves the most power, and also saves the session.

Sleep (by itself) keeps the session in RAM - if the
power goes off, the session would be lost.

A thing called "Hybrid Sleep" combines the sleep and
hiberfile functions. It writes the session out to disk.
If the power fails, the image on the disk is used on
the next boot and nothing is lost. If the power stays
on the whole time, then in about five seconds the
"RAM" session comes back, and the disk drive image
is not consulted. So "Hybrid Sleep" is a robust solution
for saving power. And it can be automated, such that
if you don't move the mouse for ten minutes, the machine
goes to sleep on its own.

Sites like this, at the bottom of the web page are
"related tutorials" links, and you can find articles about
the various things to know about sleep and hibernate.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...ows-10-pc.html

In this picture, you can see how to configure a
sleep setting. You could set the machine to sleep
after 1 hour of inactivity, for example.

https://www.tenforums.com/attachment...leep_after.png

Paul
  #4  
Old September 20th 19, 01:21 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
😉 Good Guy 😉
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Posts: 873
Default power options

On 19/09/2019 04:40, Guadalupe wrote:
What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?

Default option that you get out of the box. there is no point in
messing around with settings when you know nothing about them.

You are switching off your machine after using it, right? To do this,
click on the power switch button and choose "Shut-down". That's all you
need to do.


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  #5  
Old September 20th 19, 08:41 AM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Guadalupe
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Posts: 10
Default power options

said thus to which I respond:

In this picture, you can see how to configure a
sleep setting. You could set the machine to sleep
after 1 hour of inactivity, for example.


It's grubbed so I don't think hibernate will work.
All I really want is a shutdown or slowdown after about an hour of not use.
I don't think sleep will work with grub to linux to access windows files
will it?
  #6  
Old September 20th 19, 02:49 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Tim Slattery[_2_]
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Posts: 213
Default power options

Paul wrote:

Guadalupe wrote:
What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?


Computers have sleep and hibernate options.

Hibernate saves the most power, and also saves the session.

Sleep (by itself) keeps the session in RAM - if the
power goes off, the session would be lost.


On a desktop, certainly. On a laptop my understanding is that if the
power went off or the laptop was unplugged, the RAM would be kept
alive by battery power. If the battery got too low, the system would
switch to hibernate, which means that the current state would be
written to disk and the system would shut down.

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  #7  
Old September 20th 19, 03:00 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Stephen Wolstenholme[_6_]
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Posts: 257
Default power options

On Fri, 20 Sep 2019 09:49:12 -0400, Tim Slattery
wrote:

Paul wrote:

Guadalupe wrote:
What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?


Computers have sleep and hibernate options.

Hibernate saves the most power, and also saves the session.

Sleep (by itself) keeps the session in RAM - if the
power goes off, the session would be lost.


On a desktop, certainly. On a laptop my understanding is that if the
power went off or the laptop was unplugged, the RAM would be kept
alive by battery power. If the battery got too low, the system would
switch to hibernate, which means that the current state would be
written to disk and the system would shut down.


I think that is what my Samsung laptop does when I use it unplugged.
The battery only lasts about 30 minutes but it's current state is
saved somewhere. It is almost certainly the disk!

Steve

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  #8  
Old September 20th 19, 04:55 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Char Jackson
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Posts: 10,118
Default power options

On Fri, 20 Sep 2019 09:49:12 -0400, Tim Slattery
wrote:

Paul wrote:

Guadalupe wrote:
What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?


Computers have sleep and hibernate options.

Hibernate saves the most power, and also saves the session.

Sleep (by itself) keeps the session in RAM - if the
power goes off, the session would be lost.


On a desktop, certainly. On a laptop my understanding is that if the
power went off or the laptop was unplugged, the RAM would be kept
alive by battery power. If the battery got too low, the system would
switch to hibernate, which means that the current state would be
written to disk and the system would shut down.


That's the hybrid option, and it only works that way if it has been
configured to use that option in your power profile. None of my Dell
laptops came configured that way, but that's the option I've chosen.

Having said that, I most often choose Hibernate (from the shutdown menu)
when I'm on the road for work. In my case, it wouldn't make sense to
needlessly run the battery down when it's going to end up hibernating
anyway.


  #9  
Old September 20th 19, 06:05 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 10,218
Default power options

Stephen Wolstenholme wrote:
On Fri, 20 Sep 2019 09:49:12 -0400, Tim Slattery
wrote:

Paul wrote:

Guadalupe wrote:
What are a good set of power options for a desktop that is used only about
an hour a day in the morning?
Computers have sleep and hibernate options.

Hibernate saves the most power, and also saves the session.

Sleep (by itself) keeps the session in RAM - if the
power goes off, the session would be lost.

On a desktop, certainly. On a laptop my understanding is that if the
power went off or the laptop was unplugged, the RAM would be kept
alive by battery power. If the battery got too low, the system would
switch to hibernate, which means that the current state would be
written to disk and the system would shut down.


I think that is what my Samsung laptop does when I use it unplugged.
The battery only lasts about 30 minutes but it's current state is
saved somewhere. It is almost certainly the disk!

Steve


With hybrid sleep, you prepare the hiberfile at sleep time.
If power is lost in sleep, you have nothing to worry about,
as the hiberfile that was prepared, is still valid and
ready to go.

It's not a good idea, particularly, to be writing a hiberfile
at the same time the battery pack is resting on the knee of
the discharge curve. (For example, on an older laptop,
where the battery flattens faster.)

Paul
  #10  
Old September 20th 19, 06:12 PM posted to alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_32_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,218
Default power options

Guadalupe wrote:
said thus to which I respond:

In this picture, you can see how to configure a
sleep setting. You could set the machine to sleep
after 1 hour of inactivity, for example.


It's grubbed so I don't think hibernate will work.
All I really want is a shutdown or slowdown after about an hour of not use.
I don't think sleep will work with grub to linux to access windows files
will it?


What you need to learn to do on the Windows side, is called

"a complete shutdown"

Check the "shutdown" command manual page for windows, for details.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/...dows-10-a.html

Option 8
--------

shutdown /s /f /t 0

Immediately force running apps to close,
and then performs a full shutdown of the computer.

When you shut down Windows completely, then the BIOS
starts the system, at that point Linux will be
available via GRUB and GRUB will not be bypassed
by the hibernate bit in the chipset.

It's when you use Windows 10 in a naive fashion,
it stays "trapped in a hibernate-constrained loop".

Once you figure out how to use the "shutdown"
command line thing in Windows 10, you can then
flip over to Linux in your dual boot.

If you thought you could use hybrid sleep in Windows,
wait for the battery to die, and then Linux would
be offered on the next boot, that probably
would not work. It's going to come up in Windows
again at that point. You need to be in control
of the machine, while it is running Windows, to
select a "complete shutdown method" which will
dispense with any notion of hibernation (including
avoiding "fast start" and "windows kernel hibernation").

Paul
 




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