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CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates



 
 
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  #16  
Old September 20th 18, 02:46 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Frank Slootweg
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Posts: 607
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

VanguardLH wrote:
Mayayana wrote:

I don't get how [GPDR] a problem for software authors.


It's a nuisance to them. It is a problem for the users. Authors have
to push a new version to be GDPR compliant.


Nope. They only have to inform the user if they were/are collecting
*personal* information (i.e. things like name, e-mail address, address,
phone number, age, sex, etc.,etc.). *If* they've been collecting such
information, it most likely includes the user's e-mail address, so they
can just send e-mail, no need for a new version of the software.

And that's exactly what's happening. I've received many such e-mails.

[...]

For example, Microsoft, Avast, and many other software programs have
logistics collection sometimes called community reporting or some other
euphemism. It lets the authors know how their programs or services are
being used. Yep, you could opt-out but you were initially and covertly
opted in by default. GPDR doesn't stop authors/owners from adding even
more collection methods but it states the user must opt-in, not have to
sometime later upon discovery to opt-out.


The GPDR is about *personal* information, not about anonymous/
anonymized statistical/usage data.

Alas, GPDR does not require opt-in when the user has already consented.


Nonsense.

When you open an account at a site or establish any business or
interaction with a site, you're supposed to have already read their TOS
and privacy terms. Establishing a relationship means you grant them to
contact you, which opens the door to them spamming you. There's a whole
mess going on regarding spam and GPDR. Of course, that only affects EU
citizens since the US and other countries are not part of the EU.


Allowing a 'relation' to *contact* you is a seperate issue. It does
*not* mean that you've implicitly given consent to their past TOS, etc..
Actually the GDPR *mandates* that - as of May 25, 2018 - the relation
must explicitly ask *again* for any and all consent. And, as I've said
above, that's exactly what they're doing. Before and after May 25,
I/everybody got many, many of such requests-for-consent.

What's worse is sites that say, "Hi! Happy to see you...
as long as you agree to this thing that signs away your
rights."


Yep, their property (the web site), so they can dictate anything that
remains contractionally legal for them. GPDR only mandates the user be
informed although the information can be buried where most users cannot
find it or won't bother to look.


Nope, the information can *not* be "buried".

The GPDR does not ban any author (software or web) from collecting
information on you whether it be generic (they're not identifying you
but instead just collecting statistics) or specific. GPDR only requires
the user/visitor be informed. Silent or covert opt-in is not allowed by
GPDR.


Correct, so why do you say/imply otherwise in your earlier text?

[Non GDPR stuff deleted.]
Ads
  #17  
Old September 20th 18, 02:51 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
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Posts: 4,784
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

"Wolf K" wrote

| I have two online subs (one includes the paper versions as well). No
| ads, well worth the money around $25/month.
|

The problem with that, though, is that the system
of dishonest spying is already entrenched. It ends up
being payment *plus* spying. We have a paper
subscription to the NYT. Personally I don't think it's
worth it. They tell me the news with a business skew
36 hours after I read it online. (But I have no choice.
My ladyfriend is from Brooklyn and apparently anyone
who leaves there is required to get the NYT if they
want to retain citizenship.

I think I could get an online version of the NYT for
free with the paper, but why let them spy on me while
I read? They're so anxious to collect that data that
they now fill pages 2 and 3 with nonsensical tidbits
and lures to online content. I've developed the habit
of skipping pages 2 and 3 altogether.

I'm struck by the nerve of the NYT in this, that they're
willing to risk the alienation of customers by actually
refusing to print some articles, making them available
only online. If it were up to me I'd cancel the paper
on that point alone. Though when I do look at what
they're offering online, it turns out it's often what
the British so delightfully describe as "paff". Today
there are photos of some amateur interior designing
done by a movie director. Huh?



  #18  
Old September 20th 18, 03:00 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 2,032
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

In message , Mayayana
writes:
[]
But the consumers are already plotting ways to
beat the system without questioning it. One person
suggested getting a dog, fitting it with a fitbit, then
sending that data to John Hancock. It would be
funny if it weren't pitiably true.

[]
There could be an opportunity there, for people to offer to wear your
fitbit (and similar devices), and wander aimlessly - or aimfully for
that matter.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"He who will not reason is a bigot;
he who cannot is a fool;
he who dares not is a slave."
- Sir William Drummond

Above all things, use your mind.
Don't be that bigot, fool, or slave.
  #19  
Old September 20th 18, 03:05 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
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Posts: 4,784
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

-
"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| But the consumers are already plotting ways to
| beat the system without questioning it. One person
| suggested getting a dog, fitting it with a fitbit, then
| sending that data to John Hancock. It would be
| funny if it weren't pitiably true.
|
| There could be an opportunity there, for people to offer to wear your
| fitbit (and similar devices), and wander aimlessly - or aimfully for
| that matter.

Maybe. But their payment would probably be little
more than a coupon for power granola bars. Those
things will kill you.


  #20  
Old September 20th 18, 04:07 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
pyotr filipivich
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Posts: 421
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

VanguardLH on Wed, 19 Sep 2018 23:21:02 -0500 typed in
alt.windows7.general the following:

Spamming works because one boob in a million qualifies the spam
campaign. Spamming would not have survived if no one bought from the
spammers. It would've come and quickly disappeared because no one acted
upon that spam. So, is spam the fault of the spammers that find it
lucrative to catch one out of a million or the fault of the assholes
they buy to further fund the spamming effort? Prostitution and drug
trafficking continue to exist because there exist customers. Same for
spam.


Advertising in a nutshell. There is a cliche that half your
advertising budget is wasted, but you can't know which half.

If enough people respond to an ad campaign to pay for the
campaign, manufacturing, distribution, management, and show a profit,
it was money well spent. With Email, the cost is low, so you only
need one "sale" to recoup.*

tschus
pyotr

*I'm recalling a radio ad for HP printers (iirc). Brand X was selling
printers for $1,000,000. Hadn't sold any yet, but when they did, the
second one would be pure profit.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
  #21  
Old September 20th 18, 06:42 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
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Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off AutomaticUpdates

On 20/09/2018 04:28, VanguardLH wrote:
Mayayana wrote:

Only if they're spying. There's no reason for software
authors to be collecting personal info in the first place.


Many users consider metrics measurement as spying despite that it
doesn't necessarily identify the user. For example, they're afraid a
site will get their IP address (but then EVERY endpoint must know your
IP address to know where to handshake and send back the requested
content). Since the IP address could be collected is why users get
afraid that their identity is surrendered. If you had someone's IP
address, can you tell what is their name, sex, age, religion, political
affiliations, economic status, marital status, and so on? Nope, just
something like a 50+ radius circle for their geolocation.


Not necessarily even that - as the crow flies, I'm about 500 miles
away from where my IP comes out into the world, which is further than
the nearest capital of a neighbouring country. However, it does
identify a particular user from a particular ISP at a particular moment
in time, and this can be used with other metadata to identify particular
individuals over longer periods of time.

Does the GPDR apply to web browsers? If not then those clients don't
need to alert their users that geolocation is enabled. In Firefox, you
have to dig into about:config to disable geolocation. There have been
many programs that send metrics on their use (crash reports, run-time,
etc). Avast is one. There are many others. Yes, users can disable
that "feature" but how many users actually delve into a program's
settings?


You're missing the point. Users have the democratic *choice* of
configuring most such programs not to phone home. GDPR is about giving
users similar choices about the information collected from them on the web.

Is collection your IP address considered "personally
identifying information" when it merely lumps you in with everyone else
in a 50-mile radius? Is repeated capture of your IP address considered
personally identifying you?


Combined with other metadata, it could be.

Of course they're spying. They say so themselves.
They want me to agree to being tracked for the
purposes of targetted ads. Here's their quote:

"By choosing "I agree" below, you agree that NPR's sites use cookies,
similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device
you use to access our sites to enhance your viewing, listening and user
experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR's sponsors,
provide social media features, and analyze NPR's traffic. This information
is shared with social media services, sponsorship, analytics and other
third-party service providers."


Cookies are used for re-login.


Not necessarily. Potentially, within limits concerning the number of
cookies and their maximum individual size which differ across browsers,
they can hold any textual information a website programmer wants them to
hold.

DOM Storage is local data
similar to cookies but to hold more information about your visit and
current state at a site to be reused later. You are not forced to let
them store your user data in a local cache.


Agreed.

If you configure your web
browser regarding privacy, they cannot detect your return.


Much less certain, see below ...

So whose
responsibility is it to comply with GDPR? The site for using features
in your web browser or the author of the web browser for defaulting to
enabling those features?


Certainly morally both, and but legally probably the site, because ...

This getting akin to the argument "Who is
responsible for someone getting shot? The gun maker, the gun shop that
sold the gun, or the person that used the gun?"


Again, morally all of them, but obviously primarily the person that did
the shooting. Legally, the person doing the shooting, but the other two
may be guilty of criminal behaviour as well, depending on the circumstances.

Even if
site's didn't create EU versus non-EU versions of their sites, they
could infuriate EU citizens by prompting them to okay each condition of
their TOS or privacy policy. And, or course, denying any of their
conditions could have them just say "Goodbye. We respect your privacy
restrictions."


They'd lose business, not just from EU citizens, but also because
Americans visiting the EU would get mad at them.

If users are currently ignorant of how to configure their web browser
regarding their privacy, you really think they'll understand a barrage
of prompts querying on each point in a privacy policy or read it should
there be an obvious link on the home page? How many users read the EULA
that comes with software?


Again, they have the democratic *choice* to do so if they wish.
However, of course, the EULA is designed to protect the company's
interests, not the End User's.

There's also a link to further details:

https://text.npr.org/s.php?sId=609131973#cookiepolicy


None of which qualifies as *personally identifying information*.
IP address: etc


Again, you are missing the point. While none of these pieces of
information ON ITS OWN seems to identify very much, taken together with
other metadata that can be gathered, they can reveal an astonishing
amount, often being able to identify a particular individual.

https://panopticlick.eff.org/

Clicking 'Test Me' gives me ...

Test Result
Is your browser blocking tracking ads? ✗ no
Is your browser blocking invisible trackers? ✗ no
Does your browser unblock 3rd parties that promise to honor Do Not
Track? ✗ no
Does your browser protect from fingerprinting? ✗
your browser has a unique fingerprint

Note particularly that last result. It seems I am easily tracked.
The details of that result are appended for those who are interested.

If you were a UK resident, I'd recommend you to listen to a recent
episode of BBC Inside Science via the BBC iPlayer, but I'm not sure
whether even radio downloads are available outside the UK. Throughout
the summer they have been showcasing the short list for the Royal
Society Book Prize. One of the candidates is a book by mathematician Dr
Hannah Fry called "Hello World!" about the modern use of computer
algorithms. In this clip she explains how disparate pieces of
information, each apparently insignificant on its own, are pieced
together to be able to draw surprising conclusions. Perhaps the best
example she gives is that if you have a store loyalty card, are female,
and buy vitamin pills and unscented body lotion, they can work out that
you're pregnant, and send you offers for nappies, etc:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/play/b0bgw30j 19:02 minutes in

Alternatively, a little longer ago she was a guest panelist on The
Infinite Monkey Cage, where she expounded on this story in greater
detail, including that it was an American store called 'Target' and that
in 2012 a father of a teenage daughter had actually gone to his local
store in Minneapolis to complain about her being sent these coupons as
it seemed to be 'normalising' teenage pregnancy, but by the time the
store rang him at home to apologise, his daughter had admitted to him
that she was indeed pregnant.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b9wbf8 7:38 minutes in

Much of the following needs updating, but nevertheless it's still quite
a good canter around some of the individual threats, but the real danger
is how the small, apparently insignificant, pieces of information get
combined.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_privacy

Cookies:
"The original developers of cookies intended that only the website that
originally distributed cookies to users could retrieve them, therefore
returning only data already possessed by the website. However, in
practice programmers can circumvent this restriction. Possible
consequences include:
* the placing of a personally-identifiable tag in a browser to
facilitate web profiling (see below)
* use of cross-site scripting or other techniques to steal
information from a user's cookies.
[...] one of the most common ways of theft is hackers taking one's
username and password that a cookie saves. While a lot of sites are
free, they have to make a profit somehow so they sell their space to
advertisers. These ads, which are personalized to one's likes, can often
freeze one's computer or cause annoyance. Cookies are mostly harmless
except for third-party cookies.[23] These cookies are not made by the
website itself, but by web banner advertising companies. These
third-party cookies are so dangerous because they take the same
information that regular cookies do, such as browsing habits and
frequently visited websites, but then they give out this information to
other companies."

Photographs on the Internet
"Face recognition technology can be used to gain access to a person's
private data, according to a new study. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon
University combined image scanning, cloud computing and public profiles
from social network sites to identify individuals in the offline world.
Data captured even included a user's social security number.[45] Experts
have warned of the privacy risks faced by the increased merging of our
online and offline identities. The researchers have also developed an
'augmented reality' mobile app that can display personal data over a
person's image captured on a smartphone screen.[46] Since these
technologies are widely available, our future identities may become
exposed to anyone with a smartphone and an Internet connection.
Researchers believe this could force us to reconsider our future
attitudes to privacy."

Google Street View
" In one instance, Ruedi Noser, a Swiss politician, barely avoided
public scandal when he was photographed in 2009 on Google Street View
walking with a woman who was not his wife – the woman was actually his
secretary"

and so on. Also ...

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/new...n-the-same-pc/

https://www.chromium.org/Home/chromi...ion-mechanisms

https://pet-portal.eu/files/articles...erprinting.pdf


Here are the detailed findings ...

Browser Characteristic bits of identifying information one in x
browsers have this value value
Limited supercookie test
0.37

1.29
DOM localStorage: Yes, DOM sessionStorage: Yes, IE userData: No
Hash of canvas fingerprint
20.05

1088160.0
de7fbe2badf5c8a7fff29615325949c3
Screen Size and Color Depth
2.85

7.2
1366x768x24
Browser Plugin Details
21.05

2176320.0
Plugin 0: Java Deployment Toolkit 8.0.1410.15; NPRuntime Script Plug-in
Library for Java(TM) Deploy; npdeployJava1.dll; (;
application/java-deployment-toolkit; ). Plugin 1: Java(TM) Platform SE 8
U141; Next Generation Java Plug-in 11.141.2 for Mozilla browsers;
npjp2.dll; (Java Applet; application/x-java-applet; ) (JavaBeans;
application/x-java-bean; ) (; application/x-java-vm; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.1.1; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.1.1; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.1; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.1; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.2; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.2; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.1.3; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.1.3; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.1.2; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.1.2; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.3; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.3; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.2.2; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.2.2; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.2.1; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.2.1; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.3.1; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.3.1; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.4; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.4; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.4.1; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.4.1; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.4.2; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.4.2; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.5; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.5; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.6; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.6; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.7; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.7; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;version=1.8; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;version=1.8; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;jpi-version=1.8.0_141; ) (;
application/x-java-bean;jpi-version=1.8.0_141; ) (;
application/x-java-vm-npruntime; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;deploy=11.141.2; ) (;
application/x-java-applet;javafx=8.0.141; ). Plugin 2: PDF-XChange
Viewer; PDF-XChange Viewer Netscape Gecko Plugin;
npPDFXCviewNPPlugin.dll; (Portable Document Format; application/pdf;
pdf). Plugin 3: Shockwave Flash; Shockwave Flash 31.0 r0;
NPSWF64_31_0_0_108.dll; (Adobe Flash movie;
application/x-shockwave-flash; swf) (FutureSplash movie;
application/futuresplash; spl).
Time Zone
3.1

8.59
-60
DNT Header Enabled?
0.84

1.79
True
HTTP_ACCEPT Headers
16.1

70203.87
text/html, */*; q=0.01 gzip, deflate, br en-GB,en;q=0.7,fr;q=0.3
Hash of WebGL fingerprint
12.08

4335.3
83663cdc2084dc0bace5dcbde258572b
Language
4.15

17.72
en-GB
System Fonts
16.88

120906.67
Arial, Arial Unicode MS, Book Antiqua, Bookman Old Style, Calibri,
Cambria, Cambria Math, Century, Comic Sans MS, Consolas, Courier,
Courier New, Garamond, Georgia, Helvetica, Impact, Lucida Console,
Lucida Sans Unicode, Microsoft Sans Serif, Monotype Corsiva, MS Gothic,
MS Outlook, MS PGothic, MS Reference Sans Serif, MS Sans Serif, MS
Serif, Palatino Linotype, Segoe Print, Segoe Script, Segoe UI, Segoe UI
Symbol, Tahoma, Times, Times New Roman, Trebuchet MS, Verdana,
Wingdings, Wingdings 2, Wingdings 3 (via javascript)
Platform
3.0

8.02
Win64
User Agent
15.63

50612.09
Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; Win64; x64; rv:52.9) Gecko/20100101
Goanna/3.4 Firefox/52.9 PaleMoon/27.9.0
Touch Support
0.59

1.51
Max touchpoints: 0; TouchEvent supported: false; onTouchStart
supported: false
Are Cookies Enabled?
0.22

1.17
Yes

  #22  
Old September 20th 18, 07:07 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
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Posts: 4,784
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

"Java Jive" wrote

| Cookies are used for re-login.
|
| Not necessarily. Potentially, within limits concerning the number of
| cookies and their maximum individual size which differ across browsers,
| they can hold any textual information a website programmer wants them to
| hold.
|

In addition to your extensive listing of unique data
collected, there's an almost endless list of possibilities
for tracking. For instance, simple web bug images
can help ID by allowing 1st-party cookies to be set
by tracking companies. There's even a trick of using
script with the DOM to check the color of links in
the page, thereby telling the server which linked
pages you've visited. (Though notably, few of these
tracking methods can be used without script.)

Time and again it's been demonstrated that there's
no such thing as anonymous data. That, after all, is
the whole point of data collection in the age of computers.
Before computers you might give personal info to a
local store but it was kept in a file cabinet and only used
to deal with you as a customer. Today that same info
can be distributed and analyzed instantaneously.

A company like Google would be thwarting themselves
if they didn't personally identify people. They would
actually need a complex system in place to avoid
making the connections that their business depends on.

The page I linked the other day details some of
the simplest personal tracking that can be done
even by someone with no expertise, just by using
Google tools and thereby letting Google spy on
your visitors:

https://www.lunametrics.com/blog/201...ng-real-users/


  #23  
Old September 20th 18, 09:12 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Big Al[_5_]
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Posts: 1,218
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off AutomaticUpdates

On 09/20/2018 09:31 AM, Wolf K wrote:
I used to check FB 4
or*5*times*a*week,*now*it's*down*to*less *than*once*a*week.


I'd say 10 years ago, I lived on FB. 8-10 hours playing games. My
niece and nephew got me hooked on the games. I even bought FB money for
investing in the games to buy those extras they entice you into.

But alas I get on there once a week maybe. It's poor sort order and
lack of a good feed anymore has driven me away. My wife and I both
follow a lot of the same people and subjects and she is constantly
asking me how I see a post she doesn't.

I wouldn't cry if FB Died.

  #24  
Old September 20th 18, 09:14 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
s|b
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Posts: 1,448
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

On Tue, 18 Sep 2018 20:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown wrote:

I'm sure this How-to Geek article won't change the minds of CCleaner
lovers, but here it is:

https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/cclean...pdating-users-
who-turned-off-automatic-updates/


No silent updates on my end...

--
s|b
  #25  
Old September 20th 18, 09:57 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Big Al[_5_]
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Posts: 1,218
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off AutomaticUpdates

On 09/20/2018 04:14 PM, s|b wrote:
On Tue, 18 Sep 2018 20:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown wrote:

I'm sure this How-to Geek article won't change the minds of CCleaner
lovers, but here it is:

https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/cclean...pdating-users-
who-turned-off-automatic-updates/


No silent updates on my end...

What version are you?

  #26  
Old September 21st 18, 06:19 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
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Posts: 299
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off AutomaticUpdates

On 20/09/2018 18:42, Java Jive wrote:

Alternatively, a little longer ago she was a guest panelist on The
Infinite Monkey Cage, where she expounded on this story in greater
detail, including that it was an American store called 'Target' and that
in 2012 a father of a teenage daughter had actually gone to his local
store in Minneapolis to complain about her being sent these coupons as
it seemed to be 'normalising' teenage pregnancy, but by the time the
store rang him at home to apologise, his daughter had admitted to him
that she was indeed pregnant.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b9wbf8** 7:38 minutes in


When I wrote the above I'd only re-listened to the program as far as
finding that particular clip, which on first hearing had been been
emotionally striking enough for me to remember something about it, but,
having since re-listened to the entire program, there's actually a
better, but less emotional and therefore I had less reason to remember
it, example later on, beginning at 22:06, which describes how data from
*different* sources was combined in a similarly revealing way ...

Apparently a database of New York taxi cab data was made available to
those who had a legitimate reason to access it, but it was
insufficiently well encrypted, and someone broke the encryption and
published the data online - it contained details of every cab ride
made over a given period: cab number, starting point, destination, fare
paid, etc, even tip received. A journalist then realised that he could
search paparazzi photographs of celebs getting into cabs, identify the
cab, and then search the database for the ride data, and as a result
published a list of the different tips given by celebs to cab drivers,
and the programme also mentioned something about where they lived being
revealed!

Now, I'm not particularly sorry for the celebs in question, or most
others for that matter, but the point is that if that sort of thing can
happen to them, it can happen to private individuals as well - think
stalkers, or troublesome gangs of local youths seeking revenge on
someone who they suspect of reporting their activities to the police,
etc, etc.
  #27  
Old September 21st 18, 08:54 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ant[_2_]
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Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

FredW wrote:
On Thu, 20 Sep 2018 22:14:38 +0200, "s|b" wrote:
On Tue, 18 Sep 2018 20:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown wrote:

I'm sure this How-to Geek article won't change the minds of CCleaner
lovers, but here it is:

https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/cclean...pdating-users-
who-turned-off-automatic-updates/


No silent updates on my end...



My 5.40 portable (!) tried to phone home (never done before).
It showed in my firewall (asking permission) and I blocked.
End of CCleaner for me.


Yeah, mine phoned home too.
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  #28  
Old September 21st 18, 09:27 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
s|b
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Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

On Thu, 20 Sep 2018 16:57:26 -0400, Big Al wrote:

What version are you?


5.46 portable. I used Privatefirewall to block it though.

Anyway, funny thing just happened when I turned on my PC. CCleaner
apparently crashed and then Windows warned me my antivirus wasn't
active. No panic, it happens sometimes.I use Avast Free Antivirus, so I
clicked on the icon and got an option to restart the service. Didn't get
to activate it until I noticed the (broken) icon of CCleaner in systray.
I hovered over it with my mouse pointer, it disappeared and suddenly I
was able to restart Avast... And yet, somehow I don't feel that safe
anymore... :-o

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s|b
  #29  
Old September 22nd 18, 06:41 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Drago Giambattista Esposito
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Posts: 5
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

Stan Brown

https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/cclean...matic-updates/
That links to "Here's What You Should Use Instead of CCleaner" at
https://www.howtogeek.com/361112/her...d-of-ccleaner/


I'm late to the party, so I read this first:
https://www.howtogeek.com/fyi/ccleaner-is-silently-updating-users-who-turned-off-automatic-updates/
Which said:
- Even if users opt out of automatic updates, they're happening anyway
- Piriform is "gathering anonymized information about the user"
- The way to tell is to check the version number
- I just checked mine, which is not portable, which is "v5.39.6399"
- The article says it happens at and after version 5.46
- Privacy settings revert to the default, which sends usage data

The original forum thread discusses earlier versions having the problem,
but the summary article fixes the problem at 5.46 and above.
  #30  
Old September 25th 18, 07:53 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
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Posts: 9,512
Default CCleaner Is Silently Updating Users Who Turned Off Automatic Updates

On Thu, 20 Sep 2018 16:12:19 -0400, Big Al wrote:

On 09/20/2018 09:31 AM, Wolf K wrote:
I used to check FB 4
or*5*times*a*week,*now*it's*down*to*less*than*once *a*week.


I'd say 10 years ago, I lived on FB. 8-10 hours playing games. My
niece and nephew got me hooked on the games. I even bought FB money for
investing in the games to buy those extras they entice you into.

But alas I get on there once a week maybe. It's poor sort order and
lack of a good feed anymore has driven me away. My wife and I both
follow a lot of the same people and subjects and she is constantly
asking me how I see a post she doesn't.

I wouldn't cry if FB Died.


I'd applaud.

I have friends who get their 'news' only from FB. Yes, they're extremely
misinformed, especially about current events and politics. I have
friends who use FB to ask their contacts what kind of car they should
buy, what they should eat and where they should go for lunch, what color
shoes to wear with khaki shorts, and so on. I'd be happy to see the
whole thing collapse in a heap.

Oh, these are the same people who post a picture of every meal, as if to
say, "Hey, look at me, I found food today!" Well, so did a lot of
people. It's not exactly newsworthy. How about the people who didn't
find food today?

--

Char Jackson
 




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