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USB 3 card not working



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 5th 12, 09:18 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mick[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 55
Default USB 3 card not working

Desktop Computer system.
AMD Phenom (tm) II X 4 965 Processor 3.40 GHz
ASRock 96OGM- GS3 FX Motherboard
8GB DDR3 1333Mhz DRAM
ATI HD 5670 51MB GDDR5 DVI VGA HDMI Out Graphics
Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64 bit Operating System

Hi all,
I hope this it not too far off topic, it is in my Win 7 64 bit
computer.
The computer builder installed a ASRock USB3 Card, which does not see any
USB3 or 2 device.
When I tried to re install the driver from the supplied disc, the installer
reports " No Proper Device"
Software on the disc says: Software Version 1.1b
15G09X016002AK

On ASRock website it list the only USB3 Driver for Win 7 64bit as
Fresco Logic USB 3.0 driver ver:3.0.108.16_WHQL
I downloaded this and installed but it still did not work, but did then
allow me to install the driver from the disc.

After re booting from the start button there is listed: USB 3 Host
Controller Utility (this is highlighted)
when I click on it a box appears with a red X in with message: "Failed to
acquire Firmware Version"
Clicking on "ok" gives this information: NEC Electronics USB 3.0 Host
Controller"
Driver version: 2.0.34.0
Firmware Version:


My Seagate STAY 2000202. 2 TB Expansion Ext Hard drive, is recognised in my
XP Computer with a USB3 Card but not in the Win 7 computer USB3.

Mick.





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  #2  
Old August 5th 12, 10:07 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,281
Default USB 3 card not working

Mick wrote:
Desktop Computer system.
AMD Phenom (tm) II X 4 965 Processor 3.40 GHz
ASRock 96OGM- GS3 FX Motherboard
8GB DDR3 1333Mhz DRAM
ATI HD 5670 51MB GDDR5 DVI VGA HDMI Out Graphics
Microsoft Windows 7 Professional 64 bit Operating System

Hi all,
I hope this it not too far off topic, it is in my Win 7 64 bit
computer.
The computer builder installed a ASRock USB3 Card, which does not see
any USB3 or 2 device.
When I tried to re install the driver from the supplied disc, the
installer reports " No Proper Device"
Software on the disc says: Software Version 1.1b
15G09X016002AK

On ASRock website it list the only USB3 Driver for Win 7 64bit as
Fresco Logic USB 3.0 driver ver:3.0.108.16_WHQL
I downloaded this and installed but it still did not work, but did then
allow me to install the driver from the disc.

After re booting from the start button there is listed: USB 3 Host
Controller Utility (this is highlighted)
when I click on it a box appears with a red X in with message: "Failed
to acquire Firmware Version"
Clicking on "ok" gives this information: NEC Electronics USB 3.0 Host
Controller"
Driver version: 2.0.34.0
Firmware Version:


My Seagate STAY 2000202. 2 TB Expansion Ext Hard drive, is recognised in
my XP Computer with a USB3 Card but not in the Win 7 computer USB3.

Mick.


Examine the faceplate of the USB3 card carefully.

I had an experience like this.

I got a PCI Express parallel port card. Installed it in the PC, put the screw
in the faceplate hole, cranked it down good, and... no card was detected.

Powered off completely again, pulled out the card. Noted my card had a metal
faceplate and a couple screws. Seems the faceplate wasn't installed right.
The faceplate mounting was preventing the PCI Express connector from
fully seating in the connector.

First, I loosened the faceplate, and re-installed the card. And noted,
with the faceplate loose, the card was sitting lower into the socket,
and the gold pins on the card were no longer visible. So they were
going down into the socket.

After fiddling with it for a minute or two, I tightened up the faceplate
again (did up the two screws). And kept inserting, to check the gold
pins on the card were sinking from view like they were supposed to.

After I was sure everything was fitting properly, made sure all
screws were tight (including the card retainer screw), put the side
on the PC again, and powered up.

Now, in Windows, the card was detected, and the driver could be installed
and so on.

I suspect the x1 connector, isn't touching the slot connector pins properly.
And that's why your "Fresco" brand chip isn't being detected. It's either
that, or the chip has blown entirely. You must use good ESD handling
precautions with PCI Express, because some chip makers don't protect
the electrical signals very well against static. Even the PCI Express
slot interface itself could blow out and stop working. So sometimes, you
might even need to change slots to get it to work. But first, verify the
faceplate isn't bolted on wrong.

You could use the free version of Everest to verify it is "visible", but
Device Manager should be able to do that for you as well.

This is the download link on the Asrock site, for the motherboard manual.
There is no USB3 already on the motherboard, which is why a card is required.
The model number includes the digits "960", and that's not an "O".

ftp://174.142.97.10/manual/960GM-GS3%20FX.pdf

Double check the brand on the chip used on the USB3 card, and make
sure you're using the right driver for it. "Nec/Renesas" are the
two names of the Japanese company that made the first ever USB3 chip.
New chips shipping now, might show Renesas as the branding on them.
"Fresco" might be some other brand of chip. They might even have
different drivers for all I know. If the driver CD actually
came with the card, that might give a hint as well, as to
the identity.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renesas_Technology

Example of Fresco branded chips. This is a different company.

http://frescologic.com/products_show.php?ms=2&ps=6

From Wikipedia:

"Manufacturers of USB 3.0 host controllers include, but are not limited to,
Renesas Electronics, Fresco Logic, ASMedia Technology, Etron, VIA Technologies,
Texas Instruments, NEC and Nvidia."

They aren't including in that list, the chipsets that have USB3 built in.
These are ways to get USB3, without a separate chip soldered on the
motherboard, and have it built right into the Southbridge.

"Intel released its first chipset with integrated USB 3.0 ports in 2012
with the release of the Panther Point chipset.

AMD began supporting USB 3.0 with its Fusion Controller Hubs in 2011.
"

HTH,
Paul
  #3  
Old August 5th 12, 07:24 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mick[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 55
Default USB 3 card not working



"Paul" wrote in message ...


Examine the faceplate of the USB3 card carefully.

I had an experience like this.

I got a PCI Express parallel port card. Installed it in the PC, put the
screw
in the faceplate hole, cranked it down good, and... no card was detected.

Powered off completely again, pulled out the card. Noted my card had a metal
faceplate and a couple screws. Seems the faceplate wasn't installed right.
The faceplate mounting was preventing the PCI Express connector from
fully seating in the connector.

First, I loosened the faceplate, and re-installed the card. And noted,
with the faceplate loose, the card was sitting lower into the socket,
and the gold pins on the card were no longer visible. So they were
going down into the socket.

After fiddling with it for a minute or two, I tightened up the faceplate
again (did up the two screws). And kept inserting, to check the gold
pins on the card were sinking from view like they were supposed to.

After I was sure everything was fitting properly, made sure all
screws were tight (including the card retainer screw), put the side
on the PC again, and powered up.

Now, in Windows, the card was detected, and the driver could be installed
and so on.

I suspect the x1 connector, isn't touching the slot connector pins properly.
And that's why your "Fresco" brand chip isn't being detected. It's either
that, or the chip has blown entirely. You must use good ESD handling
precautions with PCI Express, because some chip makers don't protect
the electrical signals very well against static. Even the PCI Express
slot interface itself could blow out and stop working. So sometimes, you
might even need to change slots to get it to work. But first, verify the
faceplate isn't bolted on wrong.

You could use the free version of Everest to verify it is "visible", but
Device Manager should be able to do that for you as well.

This is the download link on the Asrock site, for the motherboard manual.
There is no USB3 already on the motherboard, which is why a card is
required.
The model number includes the digits "960", and that's not an "O".

ftp://174.142.97.10/manual/960GM-GS3%20FX.pdf

Double check the brand on the chip used on the USB3 card, and make
sure you're using the right driver for it. "Nec/Renesas" are the
two names of the Japanese company that made the first ever USB3 chip.
New chips shipping now, might show Renesas as the branding on them.
"Fresco" might be some other brand of chip. They might even have
different drivers for all I know. If the driver CD actually
came with the card, that might give a hint as well, as to
the identity.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renesas_Technology

Example of Fresco branded chips. This is a different company.

http://frescologic.com/products_show.php?ms=2&ps=6

From Wikipedia:

"Manufacturers of USB 3.0 host controllers include, but are not limited
to,
Renesas Electronics, Fresco Logic, ASMedia Technology, Etron, VIA
Technologies,
Texas Instruments, NEC and Nvidia."

They aren't including in that list, the chipsets that have USB3 built in.
These are ways to get USB3, without a separate chip soldered on the
motherboard, and have it built right into the Southbridge.

"Intel released its first chipset with integrated USB 3.0 ports in 2012
with the release of the Panther Point chipset.

AMD began supporting USB 3.0 with its Fusion Controller Hubs in 2011.
"
HTH,
Paul
Hi Paul,
Thank you for your help.

I looked at how the card was seated and it did not look like it was right
home in the slot
so I removed the cover plate holding the cards in place, and removed the
card and bent the back plate so that when it was seated in the motherboard
it lined up with the holding plate.

I did get the writing on the card, it is an ASRock USB 3.0 ROHS with
24C0XX004222 on the other side.

But still no joy, so I put the card driver disc in again and did a
repair of drivers.
I rebooted and windows said the new software was installed ok.

The warning sign has gone but no life from the card.

If the card has been damaged, and I bought a Buffalo USB 3 card as I put in
my XP Computer
Should i use the ASRock disc and remove the cards driver before fitting a
new Buffalo USB 3 card ?

I do not want to go back to the computer supplier again.
Mick.

  #4  
Old August 5th 12, 09:03 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18,281
Default USB 3 card not working

Mick wrote:

Hi Paul,
Thank you for your help.

I looked at how the card was seated and it did not look like it was
right home in the slot
so I removed the cover plate holding the cards in place, and removed the
card and bent the back plate so that when it was seated in the
motherboard it lined up with the holding plate.

I did get the writing on the card, it is an ASRock USB 3.0 ROHS with
24C0XX004222 on the other side.

But still no joy, so I put the card driver disc in again and did a
repair of drivers.
I rebooted and windows said the new software was installed ok.

The warning sign has gone but no life from the card.

If the card has been damaged, and I bought a Buffalo USB 3 card as I put
in my XP Computer
Should i use the ASRock disc and remove the cards driver before fitting
a new Buffalo USB 3 card ?

I do not want to go back to the computer supplier again.
Mick.


I think the Asrock XFast USB3 drivers, would be for Asrock USB.
They should only work on specific chips. Your motherboard doesn't
have a USB3 chip, as near as I can determine. So it's possible
the XFast USB3 software isn't a worthwhile option ? I tried looking
at the software, but can't figure out what it's supposed to do.

If you insert the Buffalo card, use the CD that came with it and
install those drivers. Maybe you'll get a response.

It's possible, the card you've bent the faceplate on, is not
an Asrock card, and the Asrock driver is not the one to use.
If the chip is Fresco Logic, then perhaps a driver from
Fresco Logic is in order.

You could check the Programs and Features control panel, and
see if the Asrock XFast USB3 is removable from there.

It's too bad you've bent the faceplate. If the faceplate had
rivets instead of screws, you should have stopped there. As your
system builder likely provides a short warranty for the installed
hardware, and a replacement USB3 card might have been covered under
warranty. Bending the faceplate would void the warranty.

In terms of fitting cards in a PC...

1) The motherboard bolts into place. There are up to nine screws.
2) The I/O plate area, constrains the position of the motherboard a bit.
But, it's possible to move the motherboard a bit in the X-Y plane.
3) As a system builder, you use a "test card" and test that the installed
cards fit smoothly. This checks the X-Y displacement, and makes sure
the motherboard is properly centered. You jiggle the motherboard around
a bit, until all the slots work smoothly. Failure to center the motherboard
properly, leads to perhaps one of the inserted cards starting to bend,
or failing to seat. I learned this the hard way, while adjusting my
motherboard in my first computer. Took a while for me to clue in :-)
4) In the Z-axis, there is an issue as well. When you buy a computer case,
it comes with a bag of screws. The bag includes standoffs (or, on cheap
computer cases, the standoffs are just a piece of metal sticking up from
the chassis). The standoffs that come in the bag, are precisely the right
height. If you use standoffs from another bag, the card could be raised
or lowered too much with respect to the motherboard. If you insert
washers (not needed) under the motherboard, that too will ruin the Z-axis
alignment. The inserted cards will go in on an angle, and there is a slight
risk of pins shorting (like on a double-row AGP connector).

So fitting cards is a three dimensional problem. And requires some care
from the system builder, to install such that all cards slide smoothly into
place.

The video card slot, has a "heel grip" on it, to help hold the card in place.
Before ripping a video card out of its slot, the heel grip must be released.
It's best to learn how the mechanism of release works, before the video card
is inserted, so you won't force it the wrong way later. I have a lot of trouble
working the lever on some of the ones I've got here.

The issue I had with my PCI Express card, was the faceplate attached with two
screws. And the positioning of the plate vertically wasn't right. A slight
adjustment of the screws, was all I needed to seat the gold pins of the
PCI Express card, into its slot. Then my card magically appeared, I could
offer drivers, and so on.

If a card is riveted, and it's not making contact, either return it and
get your money back. Or use the warranty and have them swap it. When I've
had poorly designed cards before (CMI8738 PCI audio cards), they were all
designed wrong, so a warranty swap won't change anything.

What should normally happen, is you'd get a "new hardware" dialog if a
card without drivers was detected. It should show up in Device Manager.
With no drivers, it should have a mark indicating it's malfunctioning
(because there are no drivers). It's when a card isn't making contact,
that *nothing* happens - no new hardware dialog, and no "lonely" entry in
Device Manager, asking for attention.

A replacement USB3 card shouldn't be too expensive. Read the
reviews before buying one, because there is at least one
brand of chips known not to be good (with respect to driver quality).
Use the drivers that came on the CD, to at least test the chip
on the card is not dead. Later, you can look for a driver update,
if you feel like it.

Paul
 




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