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  #16  
Old March 21st 17, 09:21 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 940
Default OT Blue

In message , Wolf K
writes:
[]
Bottom line: avoid BluRay. FWIW, I noticed a rack of deep-discounted
BluRay disks at the bargain store yesterday. Same price as discounted
DVDs. Looks like BluRay is fading away.


Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Have a good day,

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Society has the right to punish wrongdoing; it doesn't have the right to make
punishment a form of entertainment. This is where things have gone wrong:
humiliating other people has become both a blood sport and a narcotic.
- Joe Queenan, RT 2015/6/27-7/3
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  #17  
Old March 21st 17, 09:59 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
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Posts: 3,766
Default OT Blue

"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| Looks like BluRay is fading away.
|
| Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Maybe. But that's what they said about books. Turned
out a lot of people like to have an actual book to read
and don't see any bargain in paying 50% of the cost
of the book to get nothing but rental access to a digital
version.

I do no streaming. Partly for privacy. Partly because
I don't feel like setting it all up. But also because the
content is just not there. I also haven't had cable for many
years. It's wildly overpriced for things I don't care to see,
and privacy is also an issue there. In addition to TV
stations over the air, I get DVDs from the local
library and from Netflix. The Netflix streaming has a far
smaller selection than the DVD rental. Hollywood studios
don't want people to be able to see *anything*, at any
time, for $9/month. So they restrict access. From what
I've seen, Netflix streaming is similar to premium cable
stations, showing mediocre top-40 fare from 2+ years
ago. Meanwhile I get virtually anything I want to see
from Netflix DVDs, the library, or both.

From what I can see it seems the success of Netflix
streaming (which is not as profitable for them as DVD
rental) can be attributed to one factor: People don't want
to wait for what they want.


  #18  
Old March 21st 17, 10:28 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 940
Default OT Blue

In message , Mayayana
writes:
"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| Looks like BluRay is fading away.
|
| Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Maybe. But that's what they said about books. Turned


Very true!

out a lot of people like to have an actual book to read
and don't see any bargain in paying 50% of the cost
of the book to get nothing but rental access to a digital
version.


I can see that. I don't think I'd ever "buy" anything like that where it
turns out I'd only be renting. (I don't own a Kindle or anything
similar, or such software for my PC.)

I do no streaming. Partly for privacy. Partly because
I don't feel like setting it all up. But also because the


Likewise.

content is just not there. I also haven't had cable for many
years. It's wildly overpriced for things I don't care to see,


Never had it, not any form of pay TV (which for much of UK, used to
mainly mean satellite - we didn't have extensive cable penetration
before the internet).

and privacy is also an issue there. In addition to TV
stations over the air, I get DVDs from the local
library and from Netflix. The Netflix streaming has a far
smaller selection than the DVD rental. Hollywood studios
don't want people to be able to see *anything*, at any
time, for $9/month. So they restrict access. From what
I've seen, Netflix streaming is similar to premium cable
stations, showing mediocre top-40 fare from 2+ years
ago. Meanwhile I get virtually anything I want to see
from Netflix DVDs, the library, or both.


Me too - though I haven't actually bought (or borrowed from a library)
either book or music or DVD for some time; I somehow don't have the
_time_ these days. (I'm even three weeks behind in the Radio Times
cryptic crossword!)

From what I can see it seems the success of Netflix
streaming (which is not as profitable for them as DVD
rental) can be attributed to one factor: People don't want
to wait for what they want.

Indeed.

--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind. - Mahatma Gandhi
(according to the film Gandhi [1982])
  #19  
Old March 21st 17, 11:22 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_5_]
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Posts: 1,356
Default OT Blue

On Tue, 21 Mar 2017 16:59:38 -0400, "Mayayana"
wrote:

"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| Looks like BluRay is fading away.
|
| Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Maybe. But that's what they said about books. Turned
out a lot of people like to have an actual book to read
and don't see any bargain in paying 50% of the cost
of the book to get nothing but rental access to a digital
version.



Leaving aside the price, I greatly prefer Kindle books for three
reasons:

1. I can easily take umpteen books with me when I travel. I take them
on my smart phone. If they were real books, I would have a giant
problem with weight and space in my luggage.

2. Built into the Kindle app are multiple dictionaries and other
reference sources--different languages, slang, wikipedia, etc. I can
quickly and easily get to any of them as needed.

3. I can quickly and easily go back to reread something on a page long
gone by. A search gets me there with no trouble.

And since I can get Kindle books from the local library, price is
seldom a consideration.

  #20  
Old March 21st 17, 11:35 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 940
Default OT Blue

In message , Ken Blake
writes:
On Tue, 21 Mar 2017 16:59:38 -0400, "Mayayana"
wrote:

"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| Looks like BluRay is fading away.
|
| Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Maybe. But that's what they said about books. Turned
out a lot of people like to have an actual book to read
and don't see any bargain in paying 50% of the cost
of the book to get nothing but rental access to a digital
version.



Leaving aside the price, I greatly prefer Kindle books for three
reasons:

1. I can easily take umpteen books with me when I travel. I take them
on my smart phone. If they were real books, I would have a giant
problem with weight and space in my luggage.


I can definitely see that. (I guess I just haven't flown anywhere for
years.)

2. Built into the Kindle app are multiple dictionaries and other
reference sources--different languages, slang, wikipedia, etc. I can
quickly and easily get to any of them as needed.


I can see that too.

3. I can quickly and easily go back to reread something on a page long
gone by. A search gets me there with no trouble.


Excellent.

On the whole, I like electronic copies of text for most of the same
reasons as you - certainly the searching one. (I like paper ones because
I can make notes [yes I know you can with some of the electronic ones,
but ...], although I still hesitate before "defacing" an actual book.) I
guess the main reason I haven't is, like Mayayana, I can't be bothered
with setting them up.

And since I can get Kindle books from the local library, price is
seldom a consideration.

I'd forgotten you could do that.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A good pun is its own reword.
  #21  
Old March 22nd 17, 12:23 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_5_]
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Posts: 1,356
Default OT Blue

On Tue, 21 Mar 2017 22:35:12 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

In message , Ken Blake
writes:
On Tue, 21 Mar 2017 16:59:38 -0400, "Mayayana"
wrote:

"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| Looks like BluRay is fading away.
|
| Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Maybe. But that's what they said about books. Turned
out a lot of people like to have an actual book to read
and don't see any bargain in paying 50% of the cost
of the book to get nothing but rental access to a digital
version.



Leaving aside the price, I greatly prefer Kindle books for three
reasons:

1. I can easily take umpteen books with me when I travel. I take them
on my smart phone. If they were real books, I would have a giant
problem with weight and space in my luggage.


I can definitely see that. (I guess I just haven't flown anywhere for
years.)



Then it's probably nowhere near as important to you as it is to me. I
typically fly somewhere 5 or 6 times a year.

But that can be an advantage even if you go somewhere not by flying.
For example you could drive somewhere that you will be at for a few
days. Weight and space in my luggage isn't as important if I'm
driving, but it can still be a pain to have to lug around big. heavy
luggage to and from the car.


2. Built into the Kindle app are multiple dictionaries and other
reference sources--different languages, slang, wikipedia, etc. I can
quickly and easily get to any of them as needed.


I can see that too.

3. I can quickly and easily go back to reread something on a page long
gone by. A search gets me there with no trouble.


Excellent.



And a more minor point, but still a point,

4. I read in bed a lot, and my smart phone is much lighter and more
comfortable than a real book.


On the whole, I like electronic copies of text for most of the same
reasons as you - certainly the searching one. (I like paper ones because
I can make notes [yes I know you can with some of the electronic ones,
but ...],




It's easy to do in Kindle. I don't do it because I very seldom buy
Kindle books, so I won't have it for long.


although I still hesitate before "defacing" an actual book.)




I never do. When I was a little boy, my mother taught me that a book
was my best friend. That stuck and to this day, I can't deface a
book.

I
guess the main reason I haven't is, like Mayayana, I can't be bothered
with setting them up.



Setting up Kindle is very easy. You hardly have to do anything.



And since I can get Kindle books from the local library, price is
seldom a consideration.

I'd forgotten you could do that.



I can, at my library here in the US. But I don't know about the UK.
Can you do that there too?


A good pun is its own reword.



I had to cut and paste that here, since it's part of your signature
and gets deleted in the quotation. But I couldn't resist telling you
how much I liked it!
  #22  
Old March 22nd 17, 12:39 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 940
Default OT Blue

In message , Ken Blake
writes:
[]
And since I can get Kindle books from the local library, price is
seldom a consideration.

I'd forgotten you could do that.



I can, at my library here in the US. But I don't know about the UK.
Can you do that there too?

I _think_ we can.

A good pun is its own reword.



I had to cut and paste that here, since it's part of your signature
and gets deleted in the quotation. But I couldn't resist telling you
how much I liked it!


Not original I'm afraid! I can't remember where I saw it, but I liked it
too. (I'd have replied privately. If you email me your email, I'll
gladly share my quotes file.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Anybody can garble quotations like that -- even with the Bible... Er... "And he
went and hanged himself (Matthew 27:5). Go, and do thou likewise (Luke 10:37)."
  #23  
Old March 22nd 17, 01:16 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Roger Blake[_2_]
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Posts: 338
Default OT Blue

On 2017-03-21, Mayayana wrote:
Maybe. But that's what they said about books.


Ditto for vinyl records, which have experienced an amazing and unexpected
resurgence in recent years:

https://www.theguardian.com/music/20...rips-streaming

Another problem with not having physical media is that streaming services
such as Netflix frequently discontinue content.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Roger Blake (Posts from Google Groups killfiled due to excess spam.)

NSA sedition and treason -- http://www.DeathToNSAthugs.com
Don't talk to cops! -- http://www.DontTalkToCops.com
Badges don't grant extra rights -- http://www.CopBlock.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
  #24  
Old March 22nd 17, 07:08 AM posted to alt.windows7.general
Char Jackson
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Posts: 8,804
Default OT Blue

On Tue, 21 Mar 2017 21:28:49 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
wrote:

In message , Mayayana
writes:
"J. P. Gilliver (John)" wrote

| Looks like BluRay is fading away.
|
| Probably along with all forms of solid media.

Maybe. But that's what they said about books. Turned


Very true!

out a lot of people like to have an actual book to read
and don't see any bargain in paying 50% of the cost
of the book to get nothing but rental access to a digital
version.


I can see that. I don't think I'd ever "buy" anything like that where it
turns out I'd only be renting. (I don't own a Kindle or anything
similar, or such software for my PC.)

I do no streaming. Partly for privacy. Partly because
I don't feel like setting it all up. But also because the


Likewise.


Video streaming is one of those things where, once you get a taste of
it, you wonder why you waited. It's similar to the feeling you might
have had the first time you stepped foot in a public library and saw the
seemingly endless rows and rows of books. Sure, the library keeps track
of which books you've checked out, but that's completely overshadowed by
the vast selection and the awesome convenience that comes with access
that's only a few clicks of the remote away. I'd say video streaming is
a game changer, and is hastening the demise of physical video media.

For me, video streaming came along at a time when I had 3 DVD players in
the house, not counting the PC-based drives, and I was already
completely dissatisfied with the video quality that DVD provides, so it
was almost a foregone conclusion that I would move to BluRay. But at the
last minute, I decided to check out the streaming options, and it didn't
take long at all to decide that not only would BluRay not become part of
my household, the DVD players were also suddenly obsolete and all went
quickly to the local Goodwill. Good riddance to DVD, so sorry about
BluRay.

--

Char Jackson
  #25  
Old March 22nd 17, 01:56 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
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Posts: 3,766
Default OT Blue

"Char Jackson" wrote

| Video streaming is one of those things where, once you get a taste of
| it, you wonder why you waited.

For you, and probably for the majority. Especially
for the movies-as-entertainment crowd. The people
who thought Avatar was a good movie. The people
who have cable TV and don't hesitate to pay $5 for
pay-per-view selections. But for many
people, seeing thoughtful movies with depth, which
may not have wide distribution, is more important
than being able to be entertained by "something,
anything" when the the mood strikes.

Netflix DVDs provide nearly everything.
I think we pay something like $13/month for
2 at a time. Even taking our time, we probably
get about 8 per month. I find that an amazing and
effortless bargain. But it does lack the instant
gratification aspect.

Much of what I want to see only shows at small
theaters in big cities. Those movies are often not
on streaming. But virtually all are on Netflix DVDs
and many are at the library. In the past 2 weeks I've
got The Eagle Huntress, Manchester by the Sea,
and Fences. Maybe those are all available on
streaming now, but I doubt it. The studios
don't want to release that way. They don't want
movies reduced to an all-you-can-eat buffet
the way pop music has been transformed. (Movies,
after all, cost a lot and take a long time to make; then
may not succeed. Pop music is more like a manufactured
drug that can be churned out consistently to a
starving audience of addicts who will dependably pay.)

A separate issue is spyware. Maybe you
don't care about that. I oppose it on principle. Once
you're connected online you're dealing with letting
a lot of shady characters into your living room. The
business of selling private information has become
almost integral to online services and now "the Internet
of Things". Just last month, the TV maker Vizio settled
with the FTC over spying through their TV sets:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...-their-owners/

That may seem surprising, but what's more surprising
is that it's not new. In 2015 Vizio changed their "terms"
(who knew TVs had terms?!) to allow serving ads to
any device connected to the same IP address as one
of their TVs:

https://securityledger.com/2015/11/v...-your-screens/

To clarify, this is a company that sold you a piece
of hardware and they're claiming the right to spy on
you! Will we get refrigerators that refuse to make ice
cubes unless you agree to sending info about your
shopping to frozen foods companies and your health
insurance dealer?

In the same article (above) is info about Samsung
doing audio surveillance through their Internet-connected
TVs.

A change in "terms" with LG TVs in 2014 required people
to either agree to surveillance or lose some functionality:

https://securityledger.com/2014/05/b...g-no-smart-tv/

By accepting these things you help to establish those
intrusions as standards. The only way to avoid it at this
point is to not connect your TV online.


  #26  
Old March 22nd 17, 03:22 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mark Lloyd[_2_]
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Posts: 906
Default OT Blue

On 03/22/2017 08:40 AM, Wolf K wrote:

[snip]


Movies aren't novels.

I recall a review of 2001: A Space Odyssey in the Saturday Review. The
reviewer just didn't get it. He thought of "film" as literature in
another medium: that he was watching a novel instead of reading it. One
of the things that annoyed him was that the dialogue was banal. Of
course it was, it was the kind of purely functional talk real people say
in real life. But long stretches of the movie had no dialogue at all,
which I think is one reason the reviewer didn't understand the movie.
Nobody was explaining it to him.

Have a good day,


There were also a lot of breathing sounds (what you'd expect to hear in
a spacesuit).

BTW, I saw that movie in a theater when it was new. I remember a scene
near the beginning where the apes were sitting around, and there was a
message at the bottom of the screen saying "our forefathers". People in
the theater seemed to think that was funny. I've seen 2001 several times
after that, and the message was missing.

--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"If reason don't 'splain it, disdain it!"
  #27  
Old March 23rd 17, 06:23 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
TrialAndError
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Posts: 4
Default UPDATE: OT Blue

Solved the sound problem on the PC.
I have never in my decades of experience seen this and I work in
electronics all my life.

I have external speakers plugged into the monitor as I said before.
As it turns out, the connector, eitehr plug or socket seems to be faulty.

Usually when there is a bad connection the sound would crackle or cut
out all together.

In this case I got no crackles or anything like that, just that the
volume significantly reduced to a whisper.

So wiggling the connector and in and out fixes the problem for a while.
The it happens again.
Maybe it is not really the connector but the electronics in the speakers.
They are powered, have volume and tone controls.
So maybe it fades and then removing and inserting the plug wakes up the
electronics in the speakers. This is a more likely scenario. Since the
sound on both stereo speakers fades to a whisper.

Look for a new set of speakers now.
Powered
Volume control
Tone control
Balance (maybe)
Good quality sound BUT CHEAP !

Suggestions please.


  #28  
Old March 23rd 17, 07:30 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Mayayana
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Posts: 3,766
Default OT Blue

"Char Jackson" wrote

| Video streaming is one of those things where, once you get a taste of
| it, you wonder why you waited.
......
|I'd say video streaming is
| a game changer, and is hastening the demise of physical video media.
|

I got curious about this and did some looking around.
It turns out that Netflix numbers are now about 95M
streaming and 4M+ getting DVDs. Many articles about
Netflix actually talk about streaming without noting
the distinction. Like you, they assume DVDs are in the
past.

It turns out there are some interesting wrinkles. The
best numbers I can find for DVD selection vs streaming
selection is 90,000 DVDs vs 4K+ streaming titles. Almost
the reverse of subscriber numbers.

https://netflixupdate.com/netflix-up...x-dvd-service/
(That link says 90,000, as have other sources. I never
found a specific report comparing the two options.)

Streaming options have been steadily dropping, from
6,400 to 4,300 in the year up to 3/2016:

https://www.allflicks.net/netflixs-u...han-2-5-years/

One problem is that DVDs can be rented as copyrighted
property, like a book. Streaming requires a deal with the
provider. Netflix can only middleman the streaming service.

The article above speculates that with more streaming
competition, Netflix just can't afford the licensing fees
for so many movies.

One intriguing theory is that Netflix are coming up with their
own programs in order to transition to being more like a
broadcast station and lower their total cost of streaming.
(If more people watch more Netflix shows then Netflix
pays less per customer in movie fees.)

Meanwhile, new services are popping up to offer more
specialized streaming selections.

So far I'm very happy with Netflix DVDs, but if they
eventually stop the service I may just stick with broadcast
TV and the library. I could almost do that now, if I were
willing to wait longer for movies. I wonder if it might end
up like radio, with people subscribing to their favorite
stations for particular styles. That seems counter-intuitive.
Why not all streaming services just offer all selections?
Apparently the market is not likely to make that feasible.

Then, of course, there are the rural people who don't
get decent high-speed. They tend to be forgotten by
urban dwellers who assume high-speed Internet and
cellphone service everywhere. Many people in less
populated areas still don't have either.


  #29  
Old March 23rd 17, 07:38 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
Paul[_32_]
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Posts: 4,461
Default UPDATE: OT Blue

TrialAndError wrote:
Solved the sound problem on the PC.
I have never in my decades of experience seen this and I work in
electronics all my life.

I have external speakers plugged into the monitor as I said before.
As it turns out, the connector, eitehr plug or socket seems to be faulty.

Usually when there is a bad connection the sound would crackle or cut
out all together.

In this case I got no crackles or anything like that, just that the
volume significantly reduced to a whisper.

So wiggling the connector and in and out fixes the problem for a while.
The it happens again.
Maybe it is not really the connector but the electronics in the speakers.
They are powered, have volume and tone controls.
So maybe it fades and then removing and inserting the plug wakes up the
electronics in the speakers. This is a more likely scenario. Since the
sound on both stereo speakers fades to a whisper.

Look for a new set of speakers now.
Powered
Volume control
Tone control
Balance (maybe)
Good quality sound BUT CHEAP !

Suggestions please.


Test the computer output with headphones. That's to help
you determine the problem isn't on the computer end.

*******

It could be a cold solder joint in the speaker, on the
amplifier board. That's what happened to mine. I ran a
fingernail over the solder joints. Each joint would have
been failed by a trained inspector, so I had to try all
of them because they were done so poorly. (They were all
ball-shaped, and didn't have a curved meniscus.) But, I found the
bad joint and re-soldered it. And the speakers still work today.

Some audio circuits stop working, because the DC bias is upset.
Both the computer output, and the speaker input, use capacitors
and the circuit is "doubly-capacitively-coupled". Normally,
the odds of DC leakage from the computer side, upsetting the
bias point of the speaker input amplifier, would be near zero
odds. But, with poor quality caps from the "capacitor plague" era,
stranger things have happened.

Standard debugging technique (apply stimulus to input, walk through
the design, stage by stage), that's only practical if you have a
schematic. It may not be possible to follow the circuit well enough
by just eyeballing the components on it.

The speakers also need a power source. To drive "watts", the speakers
need "volts". For example, my puny other speakers, the internal
supply on those is around +16VDC. On the stereo I used to have,
it was around +50VDC. You could check the power source and verify
it is quasi-stable. Lots of these things use simple bridge rectifiers
and a large filter cap, to create the power. The circuit is typically
unregulated. If the line voltage goes too high, something can blow up.
Typically cheese-flavored amplified speakers, are at the mercy of your power
company.

My power company here, blew up my stereo, and it was because the
standing voltage on distribution here is wrong. (My 110VAC should
measure 113VAC at the mast, and it regularly rests at 121VAC.) It burned
out my stereo in stages. The display failed. The tuner failed (no more FM).
Then the mixer/remote control failed. Only the amplifying portion
remained, but I couldn't get any signal into it.

*******

You will find buying speakers, to be a difficult process. High power
amplified computer speakers, only seem to last a few years. The low
end stuff, when you read customer reviews, not all the customers
have the same "tastes". That makes it hard to decide whether
the reviews are being truthful about the value of the product or not.
For example, a review may say "OK for the price", you get it home
and there is no output below 200Hz or so. I don't expect miracles
from cheap speakers, but it is possible to get decent speakers.
The ones I got, cost only $20, but they haven't been for sale for
about 10 to 15 years. You can't buy them any more.

If you can go to a local computer store, and try their "demo rack"
of computer speakers. That will at least familiarize you with
how bad some of these things are. Nothing I saw at the stores
here, would I buy. Some were "cute", but didn't sound right.

So I bought a pair of speakers at the "surplus computer" place.
And they turned out to be better than speakers at $100 at the
other computer store. Price means nothing on the low end. You
can pay $100 and get sheer crap. Or pay $20 and be happy.

The problems with the higher end stuff, shows up after you've
been running them for a few years with the volume at 7. The vibration
kills the amp (located inside the Sub). And typically the knobs
or control box or the like, fails. The controls, they just can't
seem to make rugged assemblies for those.

Have fun,
Paul
  #30  
Old March 23rd 17, 10:00 PM posted to alt.windows7.general
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_4_]
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Posts: 940
Default OT Blue

In message , Mayayana
writes:
[]
Then, of course, there are the rural people who don't
get decent high-speed. They tend to be forgotten by
urban dwellers who assume high-speed Internet and
cellphone service everywhere. Many people in less
populated areas still don't have either.

They tend to get forgotten by the media, politicians, web designers ...
almost everyone, in fact )-:. (And it's not _entirely_ rural folk:
granted, it mostly is, but there are parts of towns [here in UK, and I'm
sure elsewhere too] that are "not-spots".)

2
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

But this can only happen if we replace the urge to blame with the urge to
learn so that it is safe for staff to admit errors and raise concerns without
the fear of being punished.
- Former MI5 boss Eliza Manningham-Buller, RT 2016/5/7-13
 




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