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  #16  
Old January 2nd 18, 02:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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Default XP Validation

Java Jive news Sat, 30 Dec 2017 12:25:58 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 29/12/2017 17:58, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

Do you mean you reloaded it to the machine it was originally on,
or to a different machine? If the original, I wouldn't expect it
to be other than still activated - I've not heard of activations
"going bad", nor of machines checking to see whether they're bad,
unless you're still doing updates.


I reloaded it back onto the same machine. I did it to see if it
had 'gone bad', in the manner of the OP's, but, as I posted above,
it seems fine, so I don't know what went wrong with the OP's.


I'm surprised you actually had to test the image in that way to
determine if the key would somehow have deactivated. There's no reason
for it to have done so.

Incidently, the activation status is stored within two very small
files. If one of them becomes corrupted/damaged for any reason, Windows
will default to a non activated status as a result. This isn't a
problem you run into with VLK editions though, as they do not and never
have required 'activation' of any sort.


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  #17  
Old January 2nd 18, 02:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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FreeMan news Fri, 29 Dec 2017 17:22:16 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

Still no one has said what will happen if I do not validate.

What are the limitations of use ?

So far I see no limitations.


Sorry, I didn't think the obvious needed to be mentioned when your
question is a search engine query away. If you continue running in a
non validated mode for a specific period of time, you'll discover (the
hard way) Windows will run in a crippled mode. Validation isn't
optional in this case, if you wish to continue getting full use of the
software for a long period of time.


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  #18  
Old January 2nd 18, 02:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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"Mayayana" news Fri, 29 Dec 2017 18:14:16 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

"FreeMan" wrote

| Still no one has said what will happen if I do not validate.
|

Look it up. People were spending the time to answer
because we assumed you needed help. Now it turns
out you have an enterprise key but just can't be
bothered to look up the details of activation?


Correction. He isn't using an enterprise key if he's being asked to
validate or activate. As the enterprise (what you're calling a VLK)
keys don't require either to be performed, ever. It's the whole point
behind having one of these keys. No pesky activation nonsense.


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  #19  
Old January 2nd 18, 02:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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pjp
Fri, 29
Dec 2017 20:31:48 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

In article ,
says...

Still no one has said what will happen if I do not validate.

What are the limitations of use ?

So far I see no limitations.


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I think some functionality gets lost and annoying pop-ups appear
if you don't get it validated but I've never had that happen.

BTW - Seems to me I've used the same key on more than one
installation at some point and both were accepted and worked
properly with pc being activated and all. I've also saved old pc's
keys before throwing box away. I've got a little pile of unused XP
keys here for various flavors of Windows, keep them in a box
somewhere ... hmmm


None of which are as good as a VLK key. XP Pro VLK edition is the
only way to go, if you don't want to be MS bitch concerning
activation and validation.


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  #20  
Old January 2nd 18, 02:01 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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Paul news Dec 2017 11:16:22 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

FreeMan wrote:
Today I started my laptop and there is no mention of Validation
required.

What's up ?


As a Leet Haxor, you've probably already looked up
what KMS and VLK are, what server one of those
contacts every X months to re-validate. And so on...

And to find out about that stuff, you must already be
a member of the (appropriate) forum :-/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volume_licensing

Your box contacted the "thing" mentioned in the
last paragraph of the article.

Paul


They don't require activation, they don't require access to validate
the key they have. Once installed with the key, you're good to go for
as long as you want to run the machine. Swap out whatever hardware
you like, whenever you like, short of the mainboard (you can do that
too if you're willing to remove some registry keys beforehand) so you
don't BSOD on reboot with the new board, but, you will not be asked
to validate or re-activate the key. VLK just doesn't work that way.

On later editions of Windows; beyond XP, things did change a little
but, but on XP, what I wrote applies.

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  #21  
Old January 2nd 18, 11:31 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
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Default XP Validation

On 02/01/2018 02:01, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive news Fri, 29 Dec 2017 13:41:35 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 29/12/2017 05:53, Diesel wrote:

You have a couple of options...You can continue trying via the
browser method, but, you need to update ie6 to atleast sp1 or, go
with ie8.

Alternatively, you can try this from console to bring up the
activation window I described above and go from there. Keep in
mind, it renders in html, so if your copy of ie is foobared, this
may not work. Each line requires you to press enter after it,
naturally.

open cmd.exe via start/run
cd\windows\system32\oobe
msoobe /a

Of the options presented, online activation probably isn't going
to work.


It depends whether the key is really legit. I activated a laptop
with XP earlier this year.


Well, it's a little more complicated than that, actually. There's
several types of legit keys and they won't all activate these days
with the simple online activation option. A completely legit key can
still fail to be accepted using that method. Been there, done it,
many times.


I suspect that your failures can be classed under the heading "Microsoft
no longer activates NEW keys"! That is, for some time, probably since
end of support, MS has not allowed activation of even 'legit' keys that
have never been activated before. They will only re-activate old
'legit' ones, as long as they are on the same or similar equipment. How
similar the equipment actually has to be is, I grant, a matter of debate
but in tests I did same make different model of laptop worked, but home
built desktop unsurprisingly wouldn't work with a key from a laptop.

Wait, I lied. There's actually another option, but, it's not
exactly a legal one. That is, if you really want to keep XP pro.
You'll have to reinstall it, from scratch though.


No, not really viable, as the rebuilt installation will not get
any updates, not even the ones originally targeting XP.


Wrong answer. You've evidently never heard of WSUS.


I've certainly heard of it, but I've not tried using it an that
situation. But it's still the correct answer in that running Windows
Update won't find any updates.

Oh drat, I forgot about another possible option. You'll have to
do your own homework/searching for it, but, there's a program out
there that can trick it into thinking it's activated. I
personally wouldn't recommend this manner of activation as, well,
it's a bandaid approach on a good day.


Or ...

On 28/12/2017 23:32, FreeMan wrote:

Where do I look in Windows to get the product key ?


Buy via eBay a for-spares-or-repairs PC or component from a
similar model and identical make of PC that has a valid, already
activated product key but for which the original PC is known to be
dead and has not been used for quite a while. For example, many
Dell laptops have their XP and Vista Product Keys on a cover of a
compartment on the base, for which I suspect you could just buy
the cover for a few dollars or quid. You may have to try two or
three before you get one that works.


That product key isn't the one that was used to install Windows on
the machine, though. And, the key may/may not be accepted by
Microsoft, especially if it's been used before or used a certain
amount of times already by others who followed the same poorly
thought out advice you offered.


It's based on an actual test I did.

The laptop I activated earlier this year was part of a test I ran,
not originally intended for actual use, but as it happens I
reloaded that image a few days ago to see what would happen, and
it's still activated.


Why wouldn't it be? Did you expect it to magically deactivate or
something?


I thought it possible that Microsoft might have changed something in
their rules for OS's that are no longer supported - it wouldn't have
surprised me to find that they had.

Cut out the know-it-all superior tone, because two significant mistakes
in your post show that you obviously don't know it all!
  #22  
Old January 3rd 18, 12:04 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
pjp[_10_]
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Posts: 1,058
Default XP Validation

In article , lid says...

On 02/01/2018 02:01, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive news Fri, 29 Dec 2017 13:41:35 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 29/12/2017 05:53, Diesel wrote:

You have a couple of options...You can continue trying via the
browser method, but, you need to update ie6 to atleast sp1 or, go
with ie8.

Alternatively, you can try this from console to bring up the
activation window I described above and go from there. Keep in
mind, it renders in html, so if your copy of ie is foobared, this
may not work. Each line requires you to press enter after it,
naturally.

open cmd.exe via start/run
cd\windows\system32\oobe
msoobe /a

Of the options presented, online activation probably isn't going
to work.

It depends whether the key is really legit. I activated a laptop
with XP earlier this year.


Well, it's a little more complicated than that, actually. There's
several types of legit keys and they won't all activate these days
with the simple online activation option. A completely legit key can
still fail to be accepted using that method. Been there, done it,
many times.


I suspect that your failures can be classed under the heading "Microsoft
no longer activates NEW keys"! That is, for some time, probably since
end of support, MS has not allowed activation of even 'legit' keys that
have never been activated before. They will only re-activate old
'legit' ones, as long as they are on the same or similar equipment. How
similar the equipment actually has to be is, I grant, a matter of debate
but in tests I did same make different model of laptop worked, but home
built desktop unsurprisingly wouldn't work with a key from a laptop.

Wait, I lied. There's actually another option, but, it's not
exactly a legal one. That is, if you really want to keep XP pro.
You'll have to reinstall it, from scratch though.

No, not really viable, as the rebuilt installation will not get
any updates, not even the ones originally targeting XP.


Wrong answer. You've evidently never heard of WSUS.


Why not just say "screw you" to MS and download an iso has every version
of XP you'd want on it and use that to do an install? The ones I've seen
also include most if not all available XP updates as part of the iso. No
need to activate and I've never run across any issues with anything
being added shouldn't be there.

Now before anyone spouts off ... Problem is, I've just had to fix too
many old folks's PCs. There's no sticker and they never have original
manuals etc. There's no way I want to tell them that even though there's
nothing really wrong with current system vcan't be fixed, MS wants them
too go out and buy a new pc (and learn a new OS when they don't even
know the one they've used for years) so they can read their email and/or
read their local news AND THAT'S ABOUT ALL. I've never met one even uses
Facebook (to confusing) and only one watches any videos (old westerns).
Only time they know of uTube is when some family member sends them a
link in an email.


  #23  
Old January 3rd 18, 02:37 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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Posts: 849
Default XP Validation

Java Jive news Tue, 02 Jan 2018 23:31:23 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 02/01/2018 02:01, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive
news alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 29/12/2017 05:53, Diesel wrote:

You have a couple of options...You can continue trying via the
browser method, but, you need to update ie6 to atleast sp1 or,
go with ie8.

Alternatively, you can try this from console to bring up the
activation window I described above and go from there. Keep in
mind, it renders in html, so if your copy of ie is foobared,
this may not work. Each line requires you to press enter after
it, naturally.

open cmd.exe via start/run
cd\windows\system32\oobe
msoobe /a

Of the options presented, online activation probably isn't
going to work.

It depends whether the key is really legit. I activated a
laptop with XP earlier this year.


Well, it's a little more complicated than that, actually. There's
several types of legit keys and they won't all activate these
days with the simple online activation option. A completely legit
key can still fail to be accepted using that method. Been there,
done it, many times.


I suspect that your failures can be classed under the heading
"Microsoft no longer activates NEW keys"!


ROFL. Actually, no. I suppose I should just save us both some time and
trouble with the ****ing contest and disclose the fact I'm actually a
certified computer technician (comptia as well as novell and a couple
of old hp certs too, oh and a long since expired ms certification that
I didn't give two ****s about when I got it; hence it's expired and has
been for over a decade or more now) with two honorary masters in
computer science and program design.

I've been doing IT professionally for a long time. What I've discussed
concerning product activation, keys, etc as well as advice I offer on
occasion comes from being in the field. Not as a home user
experimenting and playing around. I've built thousands of custom boxes,
and performed service work on thousands more. anything from a desktop
to a laptop to an embedded 'console' like system.

Just how many 'new' keys do you think are out there, anyhow? The hash
for the keys MS released years ago are already on the database the
update service references and they were before those product key
stickers ever shipped out. There's no such thing as a 'new' key in that
sense. There's some keys which weren't activated yet as a result of
customers not having them in their possession and/or not actually using
them, but, that doesn't make the key new to MS. It just makes it an
unused key. I didn't have issues with online activation on what you
call 'new' keys either, that primarily happened on machines which had
already been activated with the key on the sticker. The second online
activation option usually resolved the issue, but, on a rare occasion
I'd have to talk to a rep and explain that I was a technician who
replaced a hard disk, or replaced a mainboard under warranty and
required re-activation. MS understood perfectly well that mainboards
could be toasted for a variety of reasons, bad storms, etc, and hard
drives do fail from time to time. So they didn't run me around circles
or anything, they just forked the 'codes' the machine wanted once I
read off the codes on the screen.

I can recall only one instance where the rep wouldn't activate the key
for me, but the customer did tell me they let their kid/family member
have a copy of the key for use on their own machine, so in that
instance, I agreed with the rep and we purchased the customer a new
key. As technically, they did pirate it.

Otherwise, never had a problem. And like I said, the only times the
automated online activation failed and sent me to the computer to get
the codes was when a 'major' hardware component was changed out and the
key was already marked as activated on MS end. And rarely did that fail
and force me to speak to an understanding rep. I believe the ones that
required a rep to talk to me had been activated on more than one
occasion. Which was the case with a particular system we serviced. It
was originally sent to us because the hard disk failed. A few months
later, the mainboard took a lightning strike; so.. completely
understandable in that situation.


Wait, I lied. There's actually another option, but, it's not
exactly a legal one. That is, if you really want to keep XP
pro. You'll have to reinstall it, from scratch though.

No, not really viable, as the rebuilt installation will not get
any updates, not even the ones originally targeting XP.


Wrong answer. You've evidently never heard of WSUS.


I've certainly heard of it, but I've not tried using it an that
situation. But it's still the correct answer in that running
Windows Update won't find any updates.


Who said anything about using Windows update to get the updates? I
didn't. Updates aren't issued for XP anymore, unless something major
and drastic occurs and MS feels obligated for some reason to 'fix it'
due to the amount of XP machines still in service, not including ATM
machines still running it. Yes, I wrote ATM machines. And I'm not even
including POS (point of sale, not pile or piece of **** for
clarification although most are) machines at various retail/fast food
joints that also use it. Although some have migrated to atleast Windows
7, not all have.

If you're going to load a fresh copy of Windows XP on something that
still supports it, you're going to want updates and system drivers. It
would be foolish to assume you'll get the updates via windows update
since it's not a supported os any longer. Which means, you'll have to
get those updates another way. Windows update built into Windows XP
won't get them, but MS servers still have them available. So, you can
get them manually yourself, or use WSUS and save yourself much time and
frustration. It also significantly reduces reload time, since you don't
have to wait to download updates one by one and apply them. For a
techie (I'm guessing you aren't, or, you're new to the world of techie)
it's a real time saver. Works with later editions of Windows too.

You originally stated that the rebuilt installation will not get
updates, and, that's only partially correct. It won't, on it's own,
but, that doesn't mean it can't get them period. As, it damn well can,
via the methods I described above. So your remark is only partially
right and misleading as a result. And amusingly, advice provided in
contrast to mine because you haven't personally used WSUS to do this,
where as I have, long before XP was officially discontinued infact;
because it saves time and bandwidth. Which frees you up to work on
other machines that have more serious issues going on. Which makes you
more $$$

All of that being said, there was a time period when official support
ended but windows update from XP would still pull updates for you; I
don't know when that was shut down, or for sure if it has been since
it's been awhile since I've used it on an XP machine as I prefer to use
WSUS because it's much quicker. I could very well be wrong, but, I'm
going to assume due to the amount of time that's passed since
officially being discontinued that XP won't pull updates on it's own
anymore, but I haven't tested this theory in a long time. The next
time, mostly to humour and further educate myself, I might just do
that. Or, I might load XP in a VM and see if it can get updates.

When XP was still supported, it made no sense forcing each machine that
was reloaded or freshly built to use windows update initially chewing
up time and bandwidth as they did so when you could insert a dvd and
bring it up to the most recent updates available at the time the dvd
was created. Then you could let it do windows update (when it still
worked) and finish getting the updates you were missing. At some point
though (I forget the exact date) no more updates were forth coming so
using the updated dvd you created with WSUS (if you worked in a shop
like me) was all you needed to do, as it had them all at that point.

I didn't spend all day working on a single machine or two as a home
user or hobbyist might do; I had benches full of broken machines and
more waiting to be serviced. I didn't have the luxury of ****ing around
as a home user or hobbyist would. It wasn't uncommon for me (not even
including other techs at the same place) to be working on 8 or more
machines at once. And when one or more came off the work bench to be
checked out by another tech to make sure nothing was missed, another
machine going on the bench to replace the one (or more) that came off.
That's how it works if you know what you're doing, and your known for
your work by reputation because you have alot of stuff to work on
because people trust you to do it right, the first time. otherwise,
they wouldn't bring it to you and you wouldn't have **** to work on;
and that's bad for business.

Oh drat, I forgot about another possible option. You'll have to
do your own homework/searching for it, but, there's a program
out there that can trick it into thinking it's activated. I
personally wouldn't recommend this manner of activation as,
well, it's a bandaid approach on a good day.

Or ...

On 28/12/2017 23:32, FreeMan wrote:

Where do I look in Windows to get the product key ?

Buy via eBay a for-spares-or-repairs PC or component from a
similar model and identical make of PC that has a valid, already
activated product key but for which the original PC is known to
be dead and has not been used for quite a while. For example,
many Dell laptops have their XP and Vista Product Keys on a
cover of a compartment on the base, for which I suspect you
could just buy the cover for a few dollars or quid. You may
have to try two or three before you get one that works.


That product key isn't the one that was used to install Windows
on the machine, though. And, the key may/may not be accepted by
Microsoft, especially if it's been used before or used a certain
amount of times already by others who followed the same poorly
thought out advice you offered.


It's based on an actual test I did.



Okay, so for your test, the key on the product sticker was the one used
to load it previously, vs the SLIC key being used in it's place as it
would originally have been if it had been a name brand PC that was
preloaded from factory.

The key used during the initial preload from factory is NOT the key
visible on your sticker. That key is for you, in the event you decide
to reload from scratch and not opt for the preload it originally
shipped with; assuming you have media to do so. As in, a full blown OEM
media disc, not retail. But, it's an unmarked oem disc, has no vendor
specific information, no vendor specific jpegs, and no SLIC option.
It's plain jane. requires the key on your sticker. And will require
activation, where as the SLIC load does not, because it's mated to an
ID in the machines system BIOS.

Which is typically the 'manufacturer' string present in name brand
systems BIOS firmware.

You do realize of course, that you actually suggested piracy with your
suggestion? As technically, it's not the amount of time that's gone by
since the computer died, it's the fact the computer died and the key
technically dies with it when that happens. And, as I wrote previously,
you the would be buyer has no way of knowing how many times someone
else has already harvested and re-used that key. So you're taking a
chance on buying a key that's been activated one too many times and
may/may not be honored by the rep with MS, if both online activation
options fail to do it for you.

And you certainly don't want to tell the rep what you advised the OP to
do in so far as how you got that key. They will turn you down on the
spot if you did, politely, but turn you down non the less.

Rather than risk parting with funds for a key that may/may not still be
honored, the OP might as well seek out a VLK iso and use a VLK based
key and be done with the entire activation (prove you bought me)
nonsense for the remainder of that computers life. No matter what
hardware they swap out or how many times they change hard drives.
You'll never trip the product activation because VLK edition of XP
doesn't do product activation. It's discontinued/unsupported software
at this point and my suggestion to go with VLK and forget the ebay
business is no different from a piracy/legality perspective than yours
is. What's more, the vlk edition can be loaded on as many machines as
the OP has that run XP using the same key. And none of them will ever
complain about validation, activation, or anything else along those
lines, ever. VLK is the way to go if you're still remaining with XP. It
makes no sense to do otherwise.

If the OP needs a trusted source of VLK edition and valid key for it,
they need look no further than myself. They could even hash the iso I
offer to verify I didn't dick with it. I have VLK sp3 slipstreamed
right onto it, so you don't even need to apply a service pack. Another
time saving thing you do as a technician. And, I'd even be willing to
fork over a cherished VLK key that is valid and won't be blacklisted. I
say cherised because it's not from a keygen and it's not something
you're going to find via an online search as it hasn't been published
to the web. That's one of the benefits of being a tech for as long as I
have. You get various goodies to add to your collection over time.

That being said, you can copy the cd contents to a folder on your hard
disk, along with the boot sector, and swap out four binary files to
convert it to a manufacturer specific, SLIC enabled disc; no activation
required as long it's loaded on the manufacturer you chose equipment.
You'd then take the 'new disc' and reburn it, including the boot area;
obviously. So you could brand discs if you needed to do so, as in, a
repair shop environment. Ie, make a Dell specific disk, hp, whatever,
without actually having to have one of those in stock.

You could also convert home to pro and vise versa with those same
binary files and a single original OEM cd image. What's more, the
original OEM image can also be converted to retail branded or unbranded
with the same four files.

In case you aren't getting it, four files on the discs determines what
the disc is, and how it's going to work along with which types of keys
it'll accept and whether or not it's going to require activation,
depending on the machine you intend to load it on. If you don't have an
Hp disc but you need one and have those four files, you can make one.
Same with Dell, etc. What you don't get by doing this process is the
extras various vendors preinstalled along with windows. this just lets
you get windows and not have to keep physical media for each vendor for
reloading purposes when working on machines. Not that it applies much
these days, because, well, XP isn't a supported OS anymore.

So the aforementioned information is mostly a history lesson for techs
who didn't already know about this and non techs alike. I still make
use of it, because, well, I have to be able to work on machines that
still run older copies of Windows for various reasons. *shrug* One of
the drawbacks of being a tech, I suppose.

The electrical trade by comparison is much simpler in those respects.
Alot less crap to keep track of. Not trying to be a wiseass with you,
but, I'm an electrician well. got into the trade originally as a side
thing a little over a decade go and just couldn't walk away from it.

In other words, I can wire your house or your office or small
industrial shop and spec/build your network right down to the
individual computers which will be the network once it's completed. I'm
no carpenter or plumber though. I can do sheetrock too, but, you're
better off hiring someone else for that. It's not something I ever
claimed to be super fast at doing, although my work looks good. And
that's not because I enjoy doing sheetrock, it's because I was raised
to take pride in what you do. Your name's going on it, it better be
right kind of parental upbringing.

The laptop I activated earlier this year was part of a test I
ran, not originally intended for actual use, but as it happens I
reloaded that image a few days ago to see what would happen, and
it's still activated.


Why wouldn't it be? Did you expect it to magically deactivate or
something?


I thought it possible that Microsoft might have changed something
in their rules for OS's that are no longer supported - it
wouldn't have surprised me to find that they had.


Sure, they could do that, but, why would they bother? You already paid
for the license and you honored your end of the deal. The license
technically dies when the computer does, but, they have no way of
determining it's time of death.

Cut out the know-it-all superior tone, because two significant
mistakes in your post show that you obviously don't know it all!


I didn't have a know it all tone with you. I provided the OP sound
advice and you decided to put your two cents in without having all the
details. I accept the fact I incorrectly assumed the machine you tested
with was still factory preloaded, that you didn't wipe it out and use
another key and disc to reinstall it. That's not necessarily a mistake
on my part though as you didn't provide many specific details
concerning the computer. I simply went from experience on that one.
But, you may claim it as a mistake on my part if it makes you feel
better. After this reply, it probably would do your ego some good.

Most home users when they reload (those that do it themselves anyway),
typically use the cds that either came with the machine or the cds they
created after they got the machine home, negating any need to enter a
product key or do any sort of product activation because they are SLIC
based key loads and don't require the user entering any key or
proceeding with any product activation. It's already done during the
windows install/boot into desktop view phases for their benefit and
convenience, as well as time saver for the original vendor. Be it Dell
or HP.

However, I didn't make a mistake concerning Windows updates, despite
you incorrectly assuming I did and having to include 'using windows
update' to make your statement seem correct.

Incidently, in corp and some small business environments, you do NOT
want Windows update doing anything on it's own to any machine on your
network; you want to vet those updates before you commit them IF you
commit them, not all may/will apply to you or your situation. Down
machines due to MS **** ups is money and time lost. And please don't
pretend to tell me or anyone else reading that MS never borked a
machine with a bad update forced upon them via windows update; and it
would be forced if they had automatic updates set to on. Patch tuesday
in the It world isn't a good day. It's a '****, we're going to get an
increase in tech support calls and walk in questions, and, additional
dead/no longer booting machines if MS broke something this coming
tuesday'. It's a day we learned to dread, infact.

sorry if you got the mistaken impression I had a superior know it all
attitude with you, but, that's a case of you misunderstanding me, not
me trying to talk down to you. I don't mind this, because, well, you
knew nothing about me prior to this conversation and seemed to assume I
was a normal everyday end user, or perhaps, hobbyist. I'm neither. Now
you know.



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  #24  
Old January 3rd 18, 11:57 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
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Posts: 301
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On 03/01/2018 02:37, Diesel wrote:

Java Jive news Tue, 02 Jan 2018 23:31:23 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 02/01/2018 02:01, Diesel wrote:

I suspect that your failures can be classed under the heading
"Microsoft no longer activates NEW keys"!


ROFL. Actually, no. I suppose I should just save us both some time and
trouble with the ****ing contest and disclose the fact I'm actually a
certified computer technician (comptia as well as novell and a couple
of old hp certs too, oh and a long since expired ms certification that
I didn't give two ****s about when I got it; hence it's expired and has
been for over a decade or more now) with two honorary masters in
computer science and program design.

I've been doing IT professionally for a long time. [blah!]


Yawn!

Though now retired, so did I, for example creating for an international
financial company the UK W9x/W2k builds used on tens of thousands of PCs
here.

So I repeat, cut the bull**** and stick to the facts.

Just how many 'new' keys do you think are out there, anyhow? The hash
for the keys MS released years ago are already on the database the
update service references and they were before those product key
stickers ever shipped out. There's no such thing as a 'new' key in that
sense.


You pretend not to get it, but it seems that actually ...

There's some keys which weren't activated yet as a result of
customers not having them in their possession and/or not actually using
them, but, that doesn't make the key new to MS. It just makes it an
unused key.


.... you do - I am quite happy to call it a 'newly used' or 'previously
unused' key, if you prefer, it doesn't make any difference to the
fundamental point, which is that if a key wasn't used to activate a PC
before a certain date, presumed to be end of support, then it can't be
used now, however apparently legitimately it was obtained, and none of
your parrot talk about previous experience, which I will snip in the
interests of clarity and brevity, makes any difference to that basic truth.

[Big snip of bull****]

Wait, I lied. There's actually another option, but, it's not
exactly a legal one. That is, if you really want to keep XP
pro. You'll have to reinstall it, from scratch though.

No, not really viable, as the rebuilt installation will not get
any updates, not even the ones originally targeting XP.

Wrong answer. You've evidently never heard of WSUS.


I've certainly heard of it, but I've not tried using it an that
situation. But it's still the correct answer in that running
Windows Update won't find any updates.


Who said anything about using Windows update to get the updates?


I said that "the rebuilt installation will not get any updates, not even
the ones originally targeting XP" and that remains true. I'm interested
to find that some or all of them may be available via WSUS, and it's
something I may well investigate, but what I actually wrote above was true.

[Another big snip of bull****, that at a cursory glance looked
sufficiently irrelevant that I didn't bother to read it further]

Buy via eBay a for-spares-or-repairs PC or component from a
similar model and identical make of PC that has a valid, already
activated product key but for which the original PC is known to
be dead and has not been used for quite a while. For example,
many Dell laptops have their XP and Vista Product Keys on a
cover of a compartment on the base, for which I suspect you
could just buy the cover for a few dollars or quid. You may
have to try two or three before you get one that works.

That product key isn't the one that was used to install Windows
on the machine, though. And, the key may/may not be accepted by
Microsoft, especially if it's been used before or used a certain
amount of times already by others who followed the same poorly
thought out advice you offered.


It's based on an actual test I did.


Okay, so for your test, the key on the product sticker was the one used
to load it previously, vs the SLIC key being used in it's place as it
would originally have been if it had been a name brand PC that was
preloaded from factory.


NO IT WASN'T! Stop making an ass of yourself, if you possibly can,
clear your head for just a second or two of all those unfounded ideas of
your own self-importance, and in those few fleeting seconds actually
bother to read exactly what I wrote, which was:

On 02/01/2018 23:31, Java Jive wrote:
They will only re-activate old 'legit' ones, as long as they are on the
same or similar equipment. How similar the equipment actually has to be
is, I grant, a matter of debate but in tests I did same make different
model of laptop worked, but home built desktop unsurprisingly wouldn't
work with a key from a laptop.


Note: SAME MAKE DIFFERENT MODEL OF LAPTOP WORKED! An XP product key
from the sticker of a laptop that had died (and that I had cannibalised
for parts to repair a second one of the same model, which is still
working now, running XP, activated according to the product key on its
own sticker, as it should be) was applied successfully to a third that
had a Vista product key sticker, and this also is still working now,
running XP, activated.

So an XP product key from one model of laptop was applied successfully
to a different model of laptop that came with a Vista product key sticker.

[Another big snip of bull****, that at a cursory glance looked
sufficiently irrelevant that I didn't bother to read it further]
  #25  
Old January 4th 18, 03:03 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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Posts: 849
Default XP Validation

Java Jive news Wed, 03 Jan 2018 11:57:29 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

So I repeat, cut the bull**** and stick to the facts.


I didn't provide any.

Who said anything about using Windows update to get the updates?


I said that "the rebuilt installation will not get any updates,
not even the ones originally targeting XP" and that remains true.


Except that it isn't true. As you've learned (but not from actual
usage) WSUS can provide the updates Windows XP may (I haven't had
time to confirm this for myself) no longer retrieve on it's own.

I'm interested to find that some or all of them may be available
via WSUS, and it's something I may well investigate, but what I
actually wrote above was true.


What you wrote above was based on the fact that you incorrectly
assumed you had to use Windows Update from within the host OS to get
updates. You don't. I can actually create a Windows 7 or later update
disc, using widows XP if I so desired. Corporate systems I'm familiar
with didn't let individual workstations get updates via Windows
update either. So, I'm a little unsure about your corporate
experience claims at this point. But, I don't much care what you
claimed to do either. I'm only interested in what you write and the
lack of knowledge you continue to demonstrate concerning the subject.

[Another big snip of bull****, that at a cursory glance looked
sufficiently irrelevant that I didn't bother to read it further]


ROFL. Seems I've struck a nerve. How long have you been retired?

Okay, so for your test, the key on the product sticker was the
one used to load it previously, vs the SLIC key being used in
it's place as it would originally have been if it had been a name
brand PC that was preloaded from factory.


NO IT WASN'T! Stop making an ass of yourself, if you possibly
can, clear your head for just a second or two of all those
unfounded ideas of your own self-importance, and in those few
fleeting seconds actually bother to read exactly what I wrote,
which was:


Yep. I struck a nerve.

On 02/01/2018 23:31, Java Jive wrote:
They will only re-activate old 'legit' ones, as long as they are
on the same or similar equipment. How similar the equipment
actually has to be is, I grant, a matter of debate but in tests
I did same make different model of laptop worked, but home built
desktop unsurprisingly wouldn't work with a key from a laptop.


Note: SAME MAKE DIFFERENT MODEL OF LAPTOP WORKED! An XP product
key from the sticker of a laptop that had died (and that I had
cannibalised for parts to repair a second one of the same model,
which is still working now, running XP, activated according to the
product key on its own sticker, as it should be) was applied
successfully to a third that had a Vista product key sticker, and
this also is still working now, running XP, activated.

So an XP product key from one model of laptop was applied
successfully to a different model of laptop that came with a Vista
product key sticker.


That doesn't mean anything in the context of our hilarious
discussion, though. Those are OEM keys. Perhaps, you've been retired
long enough that you don't know what a SLIC install is? It's obvious
you don't, as you snipped a considerable amount of what I wrote
concerning them. Infact, you incorrectly claimed it was bull****.
Along with the iso conversion options you have, thanks to four files
present on the disc. You've either been retired a very long time,
predating XP by several years retirement, or, you were never much of
an actual tech yourself.

[Another big snip of bull****, that at a cursory glance looked
sufficiently irrelevant that I didn't bother to read it further]


I didn't provide any bull****. What I wrote concerning the isos and
what you can do with them isn't uncommon knowledge to techs I know.
Perhaps it's all 'new' to you, and thus dismissed as bull**** because
you've been a small step above that of an end user during your career
and have been retired for a long time now?

At the end of the day though, it doesn't matter to me. What you wrote
concerning XP isn't of any real use to the OP. You weren't even able
to provide them the console instructions to bring up the activation
window so they could try. I did. Without any assistance from you, I
might add. And you knew nothing about WSUS until I told you about it,
which doesn't sound like a well versed tech to me. It sounds more
like someone who baby sat machines and reloaded from image in the
corporate world. And, uhh, that's not a tech in the trenches.

I would hope you didn't dismiss what I wrote about VLK XP as being
bull**** along with the other technical information I provided. As,
that too can be fact checked, and, I have no problem with everything
I've written being fact checked for accuracy. Do you know why?
Although you probably don't care, I'll tell you anyway. It pleases me
to have people doubt me only to find out I was accurate and truthful
with them the entire time. I only wish I could be present to see the
look on their faces when they find out for themselves.


--
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stalking, it's highly recommended you visit he
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  #26  
Old January 4th 18, 11:30 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
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Posts: 301
Default XP Validation

On 04/01/2018 03:03, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive news Wed, 03 Jan 2018 11:57:29 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

So I repeat, cut the bull**** and stick to the facts.


I didn't provide any.


About 90% of your previous post was bull**** that I had to snip.

Who said anything about using Windows update to get the updates?


I said that "the rebuilt installation will not get any updates,
not even the ones originally targeting XP" and that remains true.


Except that it isn't true.


A new XP build will not receive updates except by Administrator
intervention to install & launch some seperate tool not included in a
standard XP build. That's the meaning of what I wrote, as quoted above,
and it's true.

What you wrote above was based on the fact that you incorrectly
assumed you had to use Windows Update from within the host OS to get
updates.


It's based upon the fact that by default, that is unless you choose to
specifically disable automatic updates, Windows XP installed before
end-of-support would automatically update itself without requiring any
human intervention other than logging on, and agreeing to a reboot when
required, but now that end-of-support has passed, this will no longer
happen.

You don't. .... subject.


[snip more self-opinionated irrelevant bull****]

Okay, so for your test, the key on the product sticker was the
one used to load it previously, vs the SLIC key being used in
it's place as it would originally have been if it had been a name
brand PC that was preloaded from factory.


NO IT WASN'T! Stop making an ass of yourself, if you possibly
can, clear your head for just a second or two of all those
unfounded ideas of your own self-importance, and in those few
fleeting seconds actually bother to read exactly what I wrote,
which was:


[snip more self-opinionated irrelevant bull****]

On 02/01/2018 23:31, Java Jive wrote:
They will only re-activate old 'legit' ones, as long as they are
on the same or similar equipment. How similar the equipment
actually has to be is, I grant, a matter of debate but in tests
I did same make different model of laptop worked, but home built
desktop unsurprisingly wouldn't work with a key from a laptop.


Note: SAME MAKE DIFFERENT MODEL OF LAPTOP WORKED! An XP product
key from the sticker of a laptop that had died (and that I had
cannibalised for parts to repair a second one of the same model,
which is still working now, running XP, activated according to the
product key on its own sticker, as it should be) was applied
successfully to a third that had a Vista product key sticker, and
this also is still working now, running XP, activated.

So an XP product key from one model of laptop was applied
successfully to a different model of laptop that came with a Vista
product key sticker.


That doesn't mean anything in the context of our hilarious
discussion, though.


Quote:
Okay, so for your test, the key on the product sticker was the
one used to load it previously, vs the SLIC key being used in


So what the above means, quite simply, without any of your bull****e is
that you were wrong!

[Another big snip of bull****, that at a cursory glance looked
sufficiently irrelevant that I didn't bother to read it further]


I didn't provide any bull****. What I wrote concerning the isos and
what you can do with them isn't uncommon knowledge to techs I know.


It's irrelevant to the discussion, because:

:-( It doesn't illuminate either the OP's problem as original stated
when I replied (he's since added more info that makes my reply, along
with many others, considerably less relevant anyway).

What you wrote concerning XP isn't of any real use to the OP.


:-( As demonstrated by my test, this claim is incorrect. My advice
would most probably have worked for him, probably at minimal expense,
and all your irrelevant bull**** since trying to pull rank rather than
actually solve his problem, doesn't alter that fundamental fact.
  #27  
Old January 5th 18, 03:59 AM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
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Posts: 849
Default XP Validation

Java Jive news Thu, 04 Jan 2018 11:30:25 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 04/01/2018 03:03, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive
news in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

So I repeat, cut the bull**** and stick to the facts.


I didn't provide any.


About 90% of your previous post was bull**** that I had to snip.


Incorrect. It was all information you knew nothing about, and,
instead of fact checking any of it, you incorrectly assumed I was
trying to bull**** you. I gain nothing by doing so as I'm under peer
review with each post I write because of some foolish things I did a
long time ago.

As in, some individuals still don't trust me despite my being retired
from a certain field in IT..So, in order to preserve and gain trust
with them and others, it would be foolish of me to post anything I
knew to be bull****. Not only would I be called out on it by them,
they'd use it as an excuse to justify their misconcieved notions that
I'm still the blackhat I once was.

You can fact check every single thing I've written to you about
windows XP and myself for that matter, I have no trouble giving you
my real name for the purpose of fact finding if you wish to do so.
You need only ask. I'll make no effort to hide any aspect of my past
from you. Again, it wouldn't do me a damn bit of good to try, I'm not
unknown in tech circles; I'm well known as a matter of fact, but, not
all of it for a good reason. And, *NONE* of it for being a bull****
artist. I just happened to have wrote some code I shouldn't have
sometime ago.

You obviously know nothing about that, but, if you want to know, just
ask me. I'll tell you, candidly so. I'm not your average repair by
replacing parts or repair by reloading windows because I can't figure
out the problem kind of tech. I never have been a half asser and I
never will be.

Who said anything about using Windows update to get the
updates?

I said that "the rebuilt installation will not get any updates,
not even the ones originally targeting XP" and that remains
true.


Except that it isn't true.


A new XP build will not receive updates except by Administrator
intervention to install & launch some seperate tool not included
in a standard XP build. That's the meaning of what I wrote, as
quoted above, and it's true.


I was going by what you wrote, above, specifically. Not some
imaginary implied meaning. Fact is, you were in error when you wrote
the comment and you tried to dismiss my advice of a reload to XP Pro
VLK edition because of your lack of knowledge concerning the fact
Windows updates can still be applied to that fresh installation.

Further, you've shown that you don't even know what a VLK
installation is, despite! claiming to be a tech from the corporate
world where VLK editions were most likely used! Unless the
corporation you babysat computers for with a reloadable image at the
ready for problems you couldn't properly diagnose was a very small
one and didn't way to pay for the additional expense of VLK.

What you wrote above was based on the fact that you incorrectly
assumed you had to use Windows Update from within the host OS to
get updates.


It's based upon the fact that by default, that is unless you
choose to specifically disable automatic updates, Windows XP
installed before end-of-support would automatically update itself
without requiring any human intervention other than logging on,


You're wrong concerning how XP works again concerning updates. It
didn't require you to login to be able to pull updates, either. It
simply needed to be up and running. Automatic updates ran by default
as a system, not user account, service. As such, no login by you was
required for it to check for updates and begin downloading them if
that's what you configured it to do.

If you configured the machine to automatically apply downloaded
updates, you didn't need to be logged in to give permission for a
reboot either. If you weren't logged in, it would reboot and apply
them as needed on it's own; pending no service level applications
were in a non idle state. You wouldn't want it automatically
rebooting without your approval if it was providing server
functionality, of course. But, you could have overridden that too.

The only time you had to agree to a reboot if you didn't configure it
otherwise was if you were logged in; because it assumed you might be
doing something, and it was best to ask for your permission first.

That was for your convenience mostly, not hard coded for the OS.

[snip more self-opinionated irrelevant bull****]


You have a hard time being wrong eh? It's okay. I deal with people
like you often enough. Your kind isn't in short supply.

I didn't provide any bull****. What I wrote concerning the isos
and what you can do with them isn't uncommon knowledge to techs I
know.


It's irrelevant to the discussion, because:


No, it's not. You dismissed it previously as some kind of bull****.
The fact you didn't know that four binary files on a disc determine
what the disc is and which types of keys it's going to accept for
installation isn't my problem. That's your own ignorance. Granted, MS
didn't exactly publish those details far and wide and you had to be
curious enough to check discs for differences to find them, unless
someone went ahead (like myself) and told you about it, you wouldn't
have known.

:-( It doesn't illuminate either the OP's problem as
riginal stated


I agree. It doesn't help the OP in any way. I provided the
information for others benefit who might still have use for XP.

when I replied (he's since added more info that makes my reply,
along with many others, considerably less relevant anyway).


Indeed. So far, I was the only one who directly provided simple
instructions (with more details infact) to bring up the activation
window so they could give it a shot. Which is what they originally
wanted to know how to do in the first place. Not only did I provide
them exactly what they wanted in very easy to follow instructions, I
provided them other options in the event none of them worked and the
rep wouldn't re-activate the key they were using.

You attacked some of the advice I offered by claiming if they
followed my advice, specifically, dumping the copy of XP they have
which is crippled in my opinion because it requires activation in the
first place by incorrectly suggesting if they followed going to VLK,
they couldn't get updates. Which, wasn't accurate on your part. They
can. I'm even willing to send the iso they'll need for the process.
Along with the vlk sp3 iso, and a valid key for installation.

Why take chances on ebay for something that may/may not work and
won't put them in a much better position anyway? Btw, they can opt to
change the key using the same instructions I originally provided if
they did decide to go your route, without having to reinstall; but
they are still taking the risk that the key they provide it won't be
accepted any more so than the one they already have. msoobe /a
doesn't just provide 'activation' options, and, if you'd been the
tech you claim to be, you'd have known that too. It also lets you
change the product key the system is using for
installation/activation and license verification purposes.

What you wrote concerning XP isn't of any real use to the OP.


:-( As demonstrated by my test, this claim is incorrect.


Your test? What good are the results of your test? You aren't using
the same key they are. Your test isn't going to magically cause their
copy to become activated. And short of providing YOUR known working
key and instructions to enter it into the OS without doing a
reinstall (which would negate your prior suggestion not to do so
because they'd lose the updates you incorrectly assumed they couldn't
get back) they gain nothing.

And how is your test of any use to the OP? You didn't use their key
and try to activate it. You brought a machine back online that's been
down awhile and confirmed the activation was holding; why you thought
it wouldn't boggles my mind. Your test was only necessary for you
because you didn't know any better. That's why you opted for your
test, and, it's a useless test for the OP. It doesn't help them in
any way, other than to confirm the key you used hasn't expired; but
again, since the keys don't have an expiration date keyed into them,
your test wasn't worth performing. Well, except for you because you
didn't know any better. But, for the OP, it's useless.

:My advice
would most probably have worked for him, probably at minimal
expense, and all your irrelevant bull**** since trying to pull
rank rather than actually solve his problem, doesn't alter that
fundamental fact.


Your advice would have cost him money with 50/50 on a good day chance
of working. Your advice is against the licensing terms and involves
piracy. (As does mine with the VLK suggestion) You neglected to
provide any instructions concerning how to bring up the activation
window, or give the OP the opportunity to change the key without
reloading windows. Where as, not only did I provide them the
instructions to bring up the activation window, another option exists
on the same page; change product key. Without reinstalling Windows.

You provided none of that detail. With the details I provided, the OP
can try to activate his/her copy of Windows (again) using the key
they have. Not only did I provide exactly what they needed to know to
bring those options up so they could make use of them, I provided
more information concerning other options should that all fail to
work as intended for them, and, none of it would cost them money or
force them to do business with people selling scrap keys on ebay. So
no risk of him losing money by getting ripped off, either.

And, I didn't pull any rank on you. You started with me by
erroneously thinking and suggesting that my advice to load VLK
edition and be done with the activation nonsense was a bad idea
because you were not aware that they could still get the required
updates. You incorrectly assumed that updates had to be downloaded
and applied by the system requesting them, and since Windows XP can't
request them anymore, you thought he'd be dead in the water. Your
advice was unsound and you had no reason to attack me for mine
because you didn't have all the facts concerning options with regard
to Windows Update.

You know nothing of slic, vlk, and by your own admission, knew
nothing about wsus or how it can be used. You know nothing about slic
because you dismissed my explanation for how it works as bull****
when it's not. It *IS* tied to the vendor ID string in the system
bios and is NOT the same key as is printed on the OEM sticker present
on the machine. They are not preloaded from factory with that key,
that key is provided for you if you for some reason, use a real OEM
copy of windows later on, instead of the preloaded version provided
to you; which is SLIC enabled. Not only does it not require
activation, if you take the cds that ship with the machine to another
one with a matching vendor ID string in the system bios, you will NOT
be asked for a product key during installation AND you won't have to
activate the machine once Windows is loaded, either. SLIC handles
that for you!

You didn't even know that you could change a true oem to a slic
dell/hp/vendor of your choice by swapping out four files! And vice
versa.

If anyone tried to pull rank or otherwise get cheeky with another, it
was you. You incorrectly assumed that your obvious limited tech
experience trumps that of mine, when, clearly, it doesn't even come
close.

Have a nice day!


--
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stalking, it's highly recommended you visit he
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  #28  
Old January 5th 18, 10:56 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Java Jive
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Posts: 301
Default XP Validation

On 05/01/2018 03:59, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive news Thu, 04 Jan 2018 11:30:25 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

On 04/01/2018 03:03, Diesel wrote:
Java Jive
news in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

So I repeat, cut the bull**** and stick to the facts.

I didn't provide any.


About 90% of your previous post was bull**** that I had to snip.


Incorrect. It was all information


That was irrelevant to the issue at hand = bull****

[So another snip of 30 lines of unread bull****]

Who said anything about using Windows update to get the
updates?

I said that "the rebuilt installation will not get any updates,
not even the ones originally targeting XP" and that remains
true.

Except that it isn't true.


A new XP build will not receive updates except by Administrator
intervention to install & launch some seperate tool not included
in a standard XP build. That's the meaning of what I wrote, as
quoted above, and it's true.


I was going by what you wrote, above, specifically. Not some
imaginary implied meaning.


On the contrary, the subsequent thread makes it clear that I was
explaining what would normally happen, while you were adding the implied
meaning of the user taking some specific out-of-the-ordinary steps that
wouldn't have been necessary pre-end-of-life. Thus what I wrote was as
true as the further contribution you then made about those specific
steps (as I presume they are true, but your general big-headedness
doesn't exactly lend confidence even in that). Because what I wrote was
true, naturally I take exception to being described as untrue, just
because you read into some meaning of your own that I never mentioned or
intended.

[So another snip of 11 lines of unread bull****]

What you wrote above was based on the fact that you incorrectly
assumed you had to use Windows Update from within the host OS to
get updates.


It's based upon the fact that by default, that is unless you
choose to specifically disable automatic updates, Windows XP
installed before end-of-support would automatically update itself
without requiring any human intervention other than logging on,


You're wrong concerning how XP works again concerning updates. It
didn't require you to login to be able to pull updates, either.


It depended upon user choices made - I always chose to be notified of
updates, and I would choose which and when to install, in which case
Obviously in the former case, you had to be logged on I believe it was
also possible just to have them install automatically. , so again, both
of us are right, and in particular, I was not wrong.

[So another snip of 19 lines of unread bull****]

I didn't provide any bull****. What I wrote concerning the isos
and what you can do with them isn't uncommon knowledge to techs I
know.


It's irrelevant to the discussion, because:


No, it's not.


This directly contradicts ...

:-( It doesn't illuminate either the OP's problem as
riginal stated


I agree. It doesn't help the OP in any way. I provided the
information for others benefit who might still have use for XP.


.... this.

[So another snip of 26 lines of unread bull****]

What you wrote concerning XP isn't of any real use to the OP.


:-( As demonstrated by my test, this claim is incorrect.


Your test? What good are the results of your test? You aren't using
the same key they are. Your test isn't going to magically cause their
copy to become activated.


I described a way to obtain another key at little or no expense, and
showed by previous testing that it would probably work. To me, that
sounds a lot more helpful than 90% of the self-opionated crap that
you've been vomiting into this subthread.

[So another snip of 16 lines of unread bull****]

:My advice
would most probably have worked for him, probably at minimal
expense, and all your irrelevant bull**** since trying to pull
rank rather than actually solve his problem, doesn't alter that
fundamental fact.


Your advice would have cost him money with 50/50 on a good day chance
of working.


As it's obvious that you haven't tried this yourself, you can have no
basis for quoting an exact figure, and therefore to attempt to do so is
basically dishonest - quoting what you'd like to be the case, in order
to avoid losing an argument, as though it were fact. I who have tried
it, based on general reasoning about the way such things work, think the
chances are somewhat higher, but one is too small a statistical sample
to hazard an actual figure, so I, unlike yourself, am going to be honest
and am not going to hazard a figure. And yes, it would have probably
cost him a small amount of money, but someone under those circumstances
might well have thought it a price worth paying.

[So another snip of 51 lines of unread bull****]

Have a nice day!


Unlikely as long as my PC screen is covered with verbal vomit from
yourself. Besides suffering from misplaced delusions of your own
self-importance, you also seem to suffer from a delusion that the more
lines you write, no matter how irrelevant, the stronger your posts will
become, whereas actually what happens is that your readers very quickly
learn to ignore it all, because even if you do say something relevant
and useful, it will be almost impossible to find amidst all the crap,
and probably not worth the effort of finding it even then.
  #29  
Old January 8th 18, 10:00 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
Diesel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 849
Default XP Validation

Java Jive news Fri, 05 Jan 2018 22:56:21 GMT in alt.windows7.general, wrote:

[So another snip of 11 lines of unread bull****]


Your efforts to jump to conclusions do amuse me. Much more so when
they are not based on fact, rather your inferiority complex.

What you wrote above was based on the fact that you incorrectly
assumed you had to use Windows Update from within the host OS
to get updates.

It's based upon the fact that by default, that is unless you
choose to specifically disable automatic updates, Windows XP
installed before end-of-support would automatically update
itself without requiring any human intervention other than
logging on,


You're wrong concerning how XP works again concerning updates. It
didn't require you to login to be able to pull updates, either.


It depended upon user choices made - I always chose to be
notified of updates, and I would choose which and when to install,
in which case Obviously in the former case, you had to be logged
on


Which isn't the default setting. So, if going by defaults, Windows
did not require you to be logged in.

I believe it was also possible just to have them install
automatically. , so again, both of us are right, and in
particular, I was not wrong.


Ahh, but, you were wrong. You said that by default, Windows XP
required you to be logged in to get the updates; and, that's just not
true. It didn't.

[So another snip of 19 lines of unread bull****]


inferiority complex shows again. Amusing, I admit.

What cracks me up more than that though is that anyone (well almost
anyone) can fact check what we've BOTH written and verify that one of
us is indeed far less knowledgeable than the other concerning this
subject, but, alas, it's not me.

So your need to dismiss what I've written multiple times as bull****
doesn't bother me in the least. I have nothing to prove here, no ego
to stroke. I'm just factual in nature and that does offend some who
thought they understood things better than they actually did/do.



Your advice would have cost him money with 50/50 on a good day
chance of working.


As it's obvious that you haven't tried this yourself, you can have
no basis for quoting an exact figure


I've had absolutely no need to go on ebay and purchase an OLD OEM key
for Windows XP. That's just a stupid as **** all thing to do, imo.
I understand if you have seriously limited options and have no other
choice, but, I'm not in such an ackward and uncomfortable position.
And, I know the risks involved in doing that, because, unlike your
retired corporate babysitter self, I've actually been a tech in the
trenches. Which is another reason I found your test so amusing. You
demonstrated by your test that you don't actually know much/anything
about the activation process. That much more so when you thought your
old key could expire on it's own.

and therefore to attempt to
do so is basically dishonest - quoting what you'd like to be the
case, in order to avoid losing an argument, as though it were
fact.


I'm not the one who's dismissing most of what the other wrote, unread
no less, as bull****. So, please, let's not even bring dishonesty or
a desire to 'win' an argument into the discussion. I find your
excuses to be weak, on a good day. From one tech to another *cough*


I who have tried it, based on general reasoning about the
way such things work, think the chances are somewhat higher, but
one is too small a statistical sample to hazard an actual figure,
so I, unlike yourself, am going to be honest and am not going to
hazard a figure.


general reasoning without any technical knowledge of how the
activation process works doesn't help the OP. Had you any real
technical expertise on the subject you would have provided them with
the console command to bring up the activation window and let them
try the options they may have available to them. You didn't, likely,
because you had no idea how to bring the window up. You don't even
know the difference between oem keys, retail keys, slic installs,
vlk, etc. And your understanding of how and when windows XP is
'allowed' to pull updates is laughable, on a good day.

And yes, it would have probably cost him a small
amount of money, but someone under those circumstances might well
have thought it a price worth paying.


A price worth paying? I tend to disagree, due to other options
available to them. Especially considering that they may be able to
resolve the issue with the console command I already provided, which
will cost them NOTHING to try.

Unlikely as long as my PC screen is covered with verbal vomit from
yourself.


You're boring me.

Besides suffering from misplaced delusions of your own
self-importance,


I have nothing to gain with this discussion, either way. I simply
shared knowledge that any real technician already knows. Obviously,
you aren't one.

[snip]



--
To prevent yourself from being a victim of cyber
stalking, it's highly recommended you visit he
https://tekrider.net/pages/david-brooks-stalker.php
================================================== =
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  #30  
Old January 12th 18, 09:23 PM posted to microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.windows7.general
freeman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 34
Default XP Validation

When did I ever say that the current Win install was with a general
license key ????

jumping to conclusions.

The laptop h=came with this OS installed and with the key it came with.

I said if necessary i could use the general license key but have chosen
not to.

So far, still not request for activation and this only happened once
after several months of on-line use and now another month or so later
still no activation request.

What do you make of that ?

 




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